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The right to work is the concept that people have a human right to work, or engage in productive employment, and may not be prevented from doing so. The right to work is enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and recognized in international human rights law through its inclusion in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, where the right to work emphasizes economic, social and cultural development.

Definition

Article 23.1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights states: The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights states in Part III, Article 6: The African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights also recognises the right, emphasising conditions and pay, i.e. labor rights. Article 15, states:

History

The phrase "the right to work" was coined by the French socialist leader Louis Blanc in light of the social turmoil of the early 19th century and rising unemployment in the wake of the 1846 financial crisis which led up to the French Revolution of 1848. The right to property was a crucial demand in early quests for political freedom and equality, and against feudal control of property. Property can serve as the basis for the entitlements that ensure the realisation of the right to an adequate standard of living and it was only property owners which were initially granted civil and political rights, such as the right to vote. Because not everybody is a property owner, the right to work was enshrined to allow everybody to attain an adequate standard of living. Today discrimination on the basis of property ownership is recognised as a serious threat to the equal enjoyment of human rights by all and non-discrimination clauses in international human rights instruments frequently include property as a ground on the basis of which discrimination is prohibited (see the right to equality before the law).

Criticism

Paul Lafargue, in ''The Right to be Lazy'' (1883), wrote: "And to think that the sons of the heroes of the Terror have allowed themselves to be degraded by the religion of work, to the point of accepting, since 1848, as a revolutionary conquest, the law limiting factory labor to twelve hours. They proclaim as a revolutionary principle the Right to Work. Shame to the French proletariat! Only slaves would have been capable of such baseness."Paul Lafargue
The Right To Be Lazy
', Chapter II, 2nd paragraph


See also

* Decent work * Equal pay for equal work * Full employment * International labor standards * Involuntary unemployment * Labor rights * Job guarantee * Protestant Work Ethic * Refusal of work * Right-to-work law * Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act * Youth suffrage * Youth rights * Age of candidacy *Eight-hour day *Right to leisure

References



External links

{{DEFAULTSORT:Right To Work Category:Human rights by issue Category:Labor rights