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The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa (University of Hawaii—Mānoa, U.H. Mānoa, the University of Hawai'i, or simply U.H.) is a public research university in Mānoa, a neighborhood in Honolulu, Hawaii, United States.[7][8] It is the flagship campus of the University of Hawai'i system, of which it houses the main offices.[9] Most of the campus occupies the eastern half of the mouth of Mānoa Valley, with the John A. Burns School of Medicine located adjacent to the Kakaʻako Waterfront Park.

U.H. offers over 200 degree programs across 17 schools. It is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges and governed by the Hawaii State Legislature and a semi-autonomous board of regents. It also a member of the Association of Pacific Rim Universities, which represents 50 research universities across 16 countries.

Mānoa is categorized as an R1 university, indicating the highest levels of research activity.[10] It is one of only four U.S. academic institutions to be a member of all four federal research programs: Land, Sea, Space, and Sun Grant.[Note 1]

Notable U.H. alumni include Robert Ballard, Richard Parsons, and the parents of Barack Obama, Barack Obama Sr. and Stanley Ann Dunham. Forty-four percent of Hawaii's state senators and 51 percent of its state representatives are U.H. graduates.[11]

History

The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa was founded in 1907 as a land-grant college of agriculture and mechanical arts. A bill by Maui Representative William Coelho introduced into the Territorial Legislature March 1, 1907, and signed into law March 23 by the Governor, enabled construction to begin. In 1912 it was renamed the College of Hawaii and moved to its present location. William Kwai Fong Yap petitioned the Hawaii Territorial Legislature six years later for university status which led to another renaming finally to the University of Hawaii in 1920. This is also the founding year of the College of Arts and Sciences. In 1931 the Territorial Normal and Training School was absorbed into the University, becoming the U.H. College of Education.

Academics

UH Mānoa campus viewed from Round Top Drive, with Diamond Head in the background

UH Mānoa has 17 schools and colleges, including the School of Architecture, School of Earth Science and Technology, the College of Arts and Humanities, the Shidler College of Business, the College of Education and the College of Engineering. The College of Business Administration was renamed the Shidler College of Business on September 6, 2006, after real estate executive Jay Shidler, an alumnus of the college, who donated $25 million to the college.[12]

Together, the colleges of the university offer bachelor's degrees in 93 fields of study, master's degrees in 84 fields, doctoral degrees in 51 fields, first professional degrees in 5 fields, post-baccalaureate degrees in three fields, 28 undergraduate certification programs and 29 graduate certification programs. Total enrollment in 2012 was 20,429 students, 14,402 of which are undergraduates. There are approximately sixteen students per instructor.

Honors Program

The UH Mānoa offers an Honors Program to provide additional resources for students preparing to apply to professional school programs.[13] Students complete core curriculum courses for their degrees in the Honors Program, maintain at least a cumulative 3.2 grade-point average in all courses, and complete a senior thesis project.[14]

Library

The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Library, which provides access to 3.4 million volumes, 50,000 journals, and thousands of digitized documents, is one of the largest academic research libraries in the United States, ranking 86th in parent institution investment among 113 North American members of the Association of Research Libraries.[15]

Rankings

The National Science Foundation ranked UH Mānoa 45th among 395 public universities for Research and Development (R&D) expenditures in fiscal year 2014.[27]

According to U.S. News & World Report's rankings for 2021, UH Mānoa was tied at 170th overall and 159th for "Best Value" among national universities; tied at 83rd among public universities; and tied at 145th for its undergraduate engineering program among schools that confer doctor

The National Science Foundation ranked UH Mānoa 45th among 395 public universities for Research and Development (R&D) expenditures in fiscal year 2014.[27]

According to U.S. News & World Report's rankings for 2021, UH Mānoa was tied at 170th overall and 159th for "Best Value" among national universities; tied at 83rd among public universities; and tied at 145th for its undergraduate engineering program among schools that confer doctorates.[28]

Distance learning

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With extramural grants and contracts of $436 million in 2012, research at UH Mānoa relates to Hawaii's physical landscape, its people and their heritage. The geography facilitates advances in marine biology, oceanography, underwater robotic technology, astronomy, geology and geophysics, agriculture, aquaculture and tropical medicine. Its heritage, the people and its close ties to the Asian and Pacific region create a favorable environment for study and research in the arts, genetics, intercultural relations, linguistics, religion and philosophy.[30]

According to the National Science Foundation, UH Mānoa spent $276 million on research and development in 2018, ranking it 84th in the nation.[27] Extramural funding increased from $368 million in FY 2008 to nearly $436 million in FY 2012. Research grants increased from $278 million in FY 2008 to $317 million in FY 2012. Nonresearch awards totaled $119 million in FY 2012. Overall, extramural funding increased by 18%.[30][31]

For the period of July 1, 2012 to June 20, 2013, the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) received the largest amount of extramural funding among the Mā

According to the National Science Foundation, UH Mānoa spent $276 million on research and development in 2018, ranking it 84th in the nation.[27] Extramural funding increased from $368 million in FY 2008 to nearly $436 million in FY 2012. Research grants increased from $278 million in FY 2008 to $317 million in FY 2012. Nonresearch awards totaled $119 million in FY 2012. Overall, extramural funding increased by 18%.[30][31]

For the period of July 1, 2012 to June 20, 2013, the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) received the largest amount of extramural funding among the Mānoa units at $92 million. SOEST was followed by the medical school at $57 million, the College of Natural Sciences and the University of Hawai‘i Cancer Center at $24 million, the Institute for Astronomy at $22 million, CTARH at $18 million, and the College of Social Sciences and the College of Education at $16 million.[32]

Across the UH system, the majority of research funding comes from the Department of Health and Human Services, the Department of Defense, the Department of Education, the National Science Foundation, the Department of Commerce, and the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA). Local funding comes from Hawaii government agencies, non-profit organizations, health organizations and business and other interests.[32]

The $150-million medical complex in Kaka‘ako opened in the spring of 2005. The facility houses a biomedical research and education center that attracts significant federal funding and private sector investment in biotechnology and cancer research and development.[citation needed]

Research (broadly conceived) is expected of every faculty member at UH Mānoa. Also, according to the Carnegie Foundation, UH Mānoa is an RU/VH (very high research activity) level research university.[33]

In 2013, UH Mānoa was elected to membership in the Association of Pacific Rim Universities, the leading consortium of research universities for the region. APRU represents 45 premier research universities—with a collective 2 million students and 120,000 faculty members—from 16 economies.[34]

U.H. is the fourth most diverse university in the U.S.[35] According to the 2010 report of the Institutional Research Office, a plurality of students at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa are Caucasian, making up a quarter of the student body. The next largest groups were Japanese Americans (13%), native or part native Hawaiians (13%), Filipino Americans (8%), Chinese Americans (7%) and mixed race (12%). Pacific Islanders and other ethnic groups make up the balance.

Campus housing

All UH Mānoa residence halls are coeducational. These include the Hale Aloha Complex, Johnson Hall, Hale Laulima, and Hale Kahawai. Suite-style residence halls include Frear Hall and Gateway House. First year undergraduates who choose to live on campus live in the traditional residence halls.[36]

Two apartment-style complexes are Hale Noelani and Hale Wainani. Hale Noelani consists of five three-story buildings and Hale Wainani has two high rise buildings (one 14-story and one 13-story) and two low-rise buildings. Second-year undergraduates and above are permitted to live in Hale Noelani and Hale Wainani.[36]

The university reserves some low-rise units for graduate students and families.[37]

Student life

Student organizations