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University of Denver
DUSeal.png
Former name
Colorado Seminary (1864-1880)
MottoPro Scientia et Religione (Latin)
Motto in English
"For Science and Religion" or "Knowledge and Spirit"
TypePrivate research university
Established1864; 156 years ago (1864)
Religious affiliation
Nonsectarian; founded by Methodists[1][2]
Academic affiliation
NAICU[3]
IAMSCU
Space-grant
Endowment$786.4 million (2019)[4]
ChancellorJeremy Haefner
Academic staff
763 (2019 Fall)[5]
Administrative staff
1,853 (2019 Fall)[6]
Students12,931 (2019 Fall)[5]
Undergraduates5,774 (2019 Fall)[5]
Postgraduates7,157 (2019 Fall)[5]
Location, ,
United States
CampusUrban/Residential
125 acres (0.51 km2)[7]
ColorsCrimson and Gold[8]
   
NicknamePioneers
Sporting affiliations
NCAA Division IThe Summit
Websitewww.du.edu
University of Denver Logo.pngprivate research university in Denver, Colorado. Founded in 1864, it is the oldest independent private university in the Rocky Mountain Region of the United States.[9] It is classified among "R2: Doctoral Universities – High research activity".[10] DU enrolls approximately 5,700 undergraduate students and 7,200 graduate students. The 125-acre (0.51 km2) main campus is a designated arboretum and is located primarily in the University Neighborhood,[11] about five miles (8 km) south of downtown Denver.

History

Mary Reed Hall and Harper Humanities Garden

In March, 1864, John Evans, former Governor of the Colorado Territory, appointee of President Abraham Lincoln, founded the Colorado Seminary[12][13][14] in the newly created (1858) city of Denver, which was then a mining camp. At its founding the seminary was non-sectarian and operated by Methodist Episcopal church. It struggled in the early years of its existence.[14] In 1880 it was renamed the University of Denver. Although doing business as the University of Denver, DU is still legally named Colorado Seminary.[15] The first buildings of the university were located in downtown Denver in the 1860s and 1870s, but concerns that Denver's rough-and-tumble frontier town atmosphere was not conducive to education prompted a relocation to the current campus, built on the donated land of potato farmer Rufus Clark, some seven miles (11 km) south of the downtown core. The university grew and prospered alongside the city's growth, appealing primarily to a regional student body prior to World War II.[citation needed] After the war, the large surge in GI bill students pushed DU's enrollment to over 13,000 students, the largest the university has ever been, and helped to spread the university's reputation to a national audience.

Campus

University Hall, built in 1890

The heart of the campus has a number of historic buildings. The longest-standing building is University Hall, which has served DU since 1890, and was built in the Richardsonian Romanesque style. The cornerstone to this building is exactly one mile above sea level. Just a few blocks off campus sits the historic Chamberlin Observatory, opened in 1894. Still a fully operational observatory, it is open to the public twice

In March, 1864, John Evans, former Governor of the Colorado Territory, appointee of President Abraham Lincoln, founded the Colorado Seminary[12][13][14] in the newly created (1858) city of Denver, which was then a mining camp. At its founding the seminary was non-sectarian and operated by Methodist Episcopal church. It struggled in the early years of its existence.[14] In 1880 it was renamed the University of Denver. Although doing business as the University of Denver, DU is still legally named Colorado Seminary.[15] The first buildings of the university were located in downtown Denver in the 1860s and 1870s, but concerns that Denver's rough-and-tumble frontier town atmosphere was not conducive to education prompted a relocation to the current campus, built on the donated land of potato farmer Rufus Clark, some seven miles (11 km) south of the downtown core. The university grew and prospered alongside the city's growth, appealing primarily to a regional student body prior to World War II.[citation needed] After the war, the large surge in GI bill students pushed DU's enrollment to over 13,000 students, the largest the university has ever been, and helped to spread the university's reputation to a national audience.

Campus

University Hall, built in 1890

The heart of the campus has a number of historic buildings. The longest-standing building is University Hall, which has served DU since 1890, and was built in the Richardsonian Romanesque style. The cornerstone to this building is exactly one mile above sea level. Just a few blocks off campus sits the historic Chamberlin Observatory, opened in 1894. Still a fully operational observatory, it is open to the public twice a week as well as one Saturday a month.[16]

Evans Memorial Chapel; built in the late 1870s by John Evans in memory of his daughter Josephine Evans Elbert[17]

The central campus area also includes Evans Memorial Chapel, an 1870s-vintage small church which was once located in downtown Denver, and was relocated to the DU campus in the early 1960s. Buchtel

The heart of the campus has a number of historic buildings. The longest-standing building is University Hall, which has served DU since 1890, and was built in the Richardsonian Romanesque style. The cornerstone to this building is exactly one mile above sea level. Just a few blocks off campus sits the historic Chamberlin Observatory, opened in 1894. Still a fully operational observatory, it is open to the public twice a week as well as one Saturday a month.[16]

Evans Memorial Chapel; built in the late 1870s by John Evans in memory of his daughter Josephine Evans Elbert[17]

The central campus area also includes Evans Memorial Ch

The central campus area also includes Evans Memorial Chapel, an 1870s-vintage small church which was once located in downtown Denver, and was relocated to the DU campus in the early 1960s. Buchtel Tower (1913) is all that remains of the former Buchtel Chapel, which burned in 1983.

Margery Reed Hall

The administrative offices are located in the Mary Reed Building, a former library built in 1932 in the Collegiate Gothic styl

The administrative offices are located in the Mary Reed Building, a former library built in 1932 in the Collegiate Gothic style. Margery Reed Hall (named for the daughter of Mary Reed) was also built in the collegiate gothic style in 1929. Margery Reed Hall has recently[when?] been designated to house the Undergraduate Program for the Daniels College of Business; an $8 million overhaul and renovation was just completed early 2014. The update for the building was to include more classroom space, a larger hall to host guest speakers, as well as mechanical and technical improvements.

New (2018) construction on campus includes the rebuilding of the current Driscoll Center Student Union into a new "Community Commons," a new residence hall and a new, larger alumni/career center to replace the Leo Block Alumni Center. These project are slated for completion in the early 2020s.

In 2005 the Graduate School of Social Work completed the renovation and significant expansion of its building, renamed Craig Hall.

In autumn 2003, DU opened a new $63.5 million facility for its College of Law, what was later named the "Sturm College of Law." The building includes a three-story library with personal computers accessible to students. Donald and Susan Sturm, owners of Denver-based American National Bank, had given $20 million to the

In 2005 the Graduate School of Social Work completed the renovation and significant expansion of its building, renamed Craig Hall.

In autumn 2003, DU opened a new $63.5 million facility for its College of Law, what was later named the "Sturm College of Law." The building includes a three-story library with personal computers accessible to students. Donald and Susan Sturm, owners of Denver-based American National Bank, had given $20 million to the University of Denver College of Law. The gift is the largest single donation in the 112-year history of the law school and among the largest gifts ever to the university.

The Daniels College of Business was completed in September 1999 at the cost of $25 million.[18] The business school has been nationally recognized by organizations such as Forbes magazine, Business Week, and the Wall Street Journal where it is ranked second in the nation for producing students with high ethical standards.[19]

F.W. Olin Hall was built in 1997 to house Biological and Natural Sciences. Olin Hall promotes an exceptional collaborative learning and study space for DU science students.

Additionally, the university opened the $70 million Robert and Judi Newman Center for Performing Arts, which houses the acclaimed Lamont School of Music. The center includes June Swaner Gates Concert Hall, a, four-level opera house seating just under 1,000, the Frederic C. Hamilton Family Recital Hall, a 222-seat recital hall with the largest (2,850 pipes) "tracker" organ in the region, and the Elizabeth Ericksen Byron Theatre, a flexible theatre space seating up to 350. The Newman Center serves as home to many professional performing arts groups from the Denver region as well as the University's Newman Center Presents multi-disciplinary performing arts series.

In the last two years, DU has also built and opened a new building for the School of Hotel, Restaurant, and Tourism Management (Fritz Knoebel School of Hospitality Management). Inside the building there are numerous classrooms, a large wine cellar, meeting rooms, and an all-purpose dining room that hosts numerous city and university events, weddings, and formal parties. The school helps DU rank near the top of all hotel schools in the United States. The program had its first graduating class in 1946.

The university has the 11th highest telescope in the world located at 14,148 feet near the summit of Mount Evans called the Meyer-Womble Observatory. This telescope is most commonly used by the university's Natural Science and Mathematics Department, and more specifically the Department of Physics and Astronomy at DU.

Nagel Residence Hall was completed in the Fall of 2008 to house upperclassman and is one of the most unusual buildings on campus, offering a wide collection of art throughout the building donated by the Nagel family. The building is certified Gold in LEED

The university has the 11th highest telescope in the world located at 14,148 feet near the summit of Mount Evans called the Meyer-Womble Observatory. This telescope is most commonly used by the university's Natural Science and Mathematics Department, and more specifically the Department of Physics and Astronomy at DU.

Nagel Residence Hall was completed in the Fall of 2008 to house upperclassman and is one of the most unusual buildings on campus, offering a wide collection of art throughout the building donated by the Nagel family. The building is certified Gold in LEED standards to be environmentally friendly and more sustainable. As well as Nagel, Nelson Hall is another LEED residence hall that was built in the last eight years.

DU completed the first ever (Peter S. Barton) lacrosse-only stadium that was specifically designed for the sport in 2005, as well as Ciber Field soccer stadium (2010) on the northern end of campus, adjoining the Nagel studio space for the School of Art, as well as the Pat Bowlen varsity sports weight training facility underneath the stands.

The environmentally friendly $25 million Morgridge College of Education was opened in June 2010.

At the beginning of the summer of 2011, the 41-year-old Penrose Library closed for a $32 million renovation, and reopened in the Spring of 2013 as the Anderson Academic Commons, a 21st-century high-tech collaboration and study space - one of the most advanced and technologically capable libraries among universities throughout the country.

The university has five residence halls, Johnson McFarlane Hall (JMac), Centennial Halls, Centennial Towers, Nelson Hall and Nagel Hall. Johnson McFarlane Hall was energy star certified in September 2011 as one of the most energy efficient buildings on campus,[20][21] and is the oldest co-ed dorm in the western United States.

In 2019 the University of Denver had an undergraduate student body of 5,774 and a graduate student body of 7,157, with a total student enrollment of 12,931. Of the undergraduate student body: the ratio of women to men was 54% women to 46% men and the ratio of race/ethnicity was 68.0% White, 2.2% Black, 12% Hispanic, 3.9% Asian or Pacific Islander, and >1% American Indian, with roughly 5% mixed. The average accepted high school student obtained a 3.72 GPA, SAT range of 1220 to 1500, and an ACT of 28. Roughly over 53% of the incoming freshman class was in the top 10% of their graduating high school class. The University of Denver likes to promote inclusiveness; therefore, there are numerous programs and people available to help transfer (or international students). 6% and 5% of the undergraduate and graduate student bodies were international, respectively.[5]

Business 80
Education 112
Engineering 152
Law 74

USNWR departmental rankings[31]

Clinical Psychology 50
English 116
Fine Arts 124
Library & Information Studies 40
Psychology 81
Social Work 17

The undergraduate business program, The Daniels College of Business, was ranked 87th best in 2016 by BusinessWeek, and it was ranked the 71st best program by U.S. News in a 2008 ranking.[32]

The Creative Writing Doctoral Program in the Department of English, one of the oldest such programs in the nation, is ranked 1st by Poets & Writers magazine.[33] The program was founded by the distinguished novelist, John Edward Williams, co-recipient of the 1973 National Book Award in Fiction, along with John Barth, for his novel Augustus.

The Financial Times has ranked the Daniels College of Business Executive MBA program in the top 100 programs in the World in a 2011–2012 ranking.

In a 2012 survey performed by the College of William and Mary and published by Foreign Policy Magazine, the Josef Korbel School of International Studies ranked 11th in the world for its graduate masters program, ahead of such schools as Syracuse, Yale, Stanford, University of California-Berkeley, Oxford and MIT.[34]

F W Olin Hall for Biological and Natural Sciences

The University of Denver has almost 70.2% of its undergraduate student body study abroad before graduation, placing it first in the nation among all doctoral and research institutions in percentage of undergraduate students participating in study abroad programs.[35]

The Aspen Institute's 2011–2012 edition of Beyond Grey Pinstripes, a biennial survey and alternative ranking of business schools, ranked the USNWR departmental rankings[31]

Clinical Psychology 50 English 116 Fine Arts 124 Library & Information Studies 40 Psychology 81 Social Work 17 The undergraduate business program, The Daniels College of Business, was ranked 87th best in 2016 by BusinessWeek, and it was ranked the 71st best program by U.S. News in a 2008 ranking.[32]

The Creative Writing Doctoral Program in the Department of English, one of the oldest such programs in the nation, is ranked 1st by Poets & Writers magazine.[33] The

The Creative Writing Doctoral Program in the Department of English, one of the oldest such programs in the nation, is ranked 1st by Poets & Writers magazine.[33] The program was founded by the distinguished novelist, John Edward Williams, co-recipient of the 1973 National Book Award in Fiction, along with John Barth, for his novel Augustus.

The Financial Times has ranked the Daniels College of Business Executive MBA program in the top 100 programs in the World in a 2011–2012 ranking.

In a 2012 survey performed by the College of William and Mary and published by Foreign Policy Magazine, the Josef Korbel School of International Studies ranked 11th in the world for its graduate masters program, ahead of such schools as Syracuse, Yale, Stanford, University of California-Berkeley, Oxford and MIT.[34]

The University of Denver has almost 70.2% of its undergraduate student body study abroad before graduation, placing it first in the nation among all doctoral and research institutions in percentage of undergraduate students participating in study abroad programs.[35]

The Aspen Institute's 2011–2012 edition of Beyond Grey Pinstripes, a biennial survey and alternative ranking of business schools, ranked the Daniels College of Business the 15th best MBA program in the world. The survey puts emphasis on how well schools are preparing their students for the environmental, social, and ethical complexities of modern-day business.

On October 3, 2012, the university hosted the first U.S.

The Aspen Institute's 2011–2012 edition of Beyond Grey Pinstripes, a biennial survey and alternative ranking of business schools, ranked the Daniels College of Business the 15th best MBA program in the world. The survey puts emphasis on how well schools are preparing their students for the environmental, social, and ethical complexities of modern-day business.

On October 3, 2012, the university hosted the first U.S. presidential debate of 2012.

Schools and Colleges: