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Samuel Hubbel Treat Jr. (June 21, 1811 – March 27, 1887) was an American lawyer and jurist who served as a Justice of the Illinois Supreme Court and a United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Illinois.

Education and career

Born in Plainfield, New York, Treat read law to enter the bar in 1834. He was in private practice in Springfield, Illinois from 1834 to 1839. He was a Judge of the Circuit Court of Illinois from 1839 to 1841, becoming a Justice of the Illinois Supreme Court in 1841. He served on that court until 1855, serving as Chief Justice from 1848.

Federal judicial service

On March 3, 1855, Treat was nominated by President Franklin Pierce to a new seat on the United States District Court for the Southern District of Illinois created by 10 Stat. 606. Treat was confirmed by the United States Senate on March 3, 1855, and received his commission the same day. He served until his death on March 27, 1887, in Springfield.

Court appearances by Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln often appeared in court before Judge Treat. The Illinois State Bar Association estimates that "Between 1839 and 1855, Judge Treat heard Lincoln argue 870 circuit court cases and about 162 Supreme Court matters. As a federal judge, he heard at least 136 more of Lincoln's cases."Anderson, Stephen. "Marker Sought for Judge Treat, Lincoln's Chess Partner," Illinois State Bar Association Bar News (February 2, 2005).

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* {{DEFAULTSORT:Treat, Samuel Hubbel Jr. Category:1811 births Category:1887 deaths Category:Illinois state court judges Category:Judges of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Illinois Category:United States federal judges appointed by Franklin Pierce Category:19th-century American judges Category:Chief Justices of the Illinois Supreme Court Category:People from Plainfield, New York Category:People from Springfield, Illinois Category:United States federal judges admitted to the practice of law by reading law