HOME
        TheInfoList






David M. Axelrod (born February 22, 1955) is an American political consultant and analyst and former White House official. He is best known for being the chief strategist for Barack Obama's presidential campaigns. After Obama's election, Axelrod was appointed as Senior Advisor to the President.[1] He left the position in early 2011 and became the Senior Strategist for Obama's successful re-election campaign in 2012.[2][3] Axelrod wrote for the Chicago Tribune, and joined CNN as Senior Political Commentator in 2015.[4] As of December 2019, Axelrod serves as the director of the non-partisan University of Chicago Institute of Politics.[5] His memoir is titled Believer: My Forty Years in Politics.[4][6]

Early life

Axelrod was born on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, New York City, and grew up in its Stuyvesant Town area.[7][8] He was raised in a liberal Jewish family[9]<

Axelrod was born on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, New York City, and grew up in its Stuyvesant Town area.[7][8] He was raised in a liberal Jewish family[9][10] and had his bar mitzvah ceremony at the Brotherhood Synagogue in Manhattan.[11] His mother, Myril Bennett (née Davidson), was a journalist at PM, a liberal-leaning 1940s newspaper, and later an advertising executive at Young & Rubicam.[12] His father, Joseph Axelrod, was a psychologist and avid baseball fan, who migrated from Eastern Europe to the United States at the age of eleven.[13][14][15][16][17] He attended Public School 40 in Manhattan. Axelrod's parents separated when he was eight years old.

Describing the appeal of politics, he told the Los Angeles Times, "I got into politics because I believe in idealism. Just to be a part of this effort that seems to be rekindling the kind of idealism that I knew when I was a kid, it's a great thing to do. So I find myself getting very emotional about it."[18] At thirteen years old, he was selling campaign buttons for Robert F. Kennedy. After graduating from New York's Stuyvesant High School[14] in 1972, Axelrod attended the University of Chicago, where he majored in political science.[19]

As an undergraduate, Axelrod wrote for the Hyde Park Herald, covering politics, and earned an internship at the Chicago Tribune. He lost his father to suicide in 1977, around the time of his graduation.[20] While at the University of Chicago he met his future wife, business student Susan Landau (daughter of research doctor Richard L. Landau),[21] and they married in 1979. In June 1981, their first child, a daughter, was diagnosed with epilepsy at seven months of age.[22]

Career

When details of the 2010 United States foreclosure crisis were publicized in 2010, notably robo-signing, Axelrod was widely criticized for downplaying the magnitude of the crisis in his comments to the press,[53][54] telling the audience of CBS News' Face the Nation that the Obama administration's "hope is this moves rapidly and that this gets unwound very, very quickly" and that he's "not sure that a national moratorium" is called for since "there are in fact valid foreclosures that probably should go forward."[55] Notably, Axelrod made this statement after several banks had voluntarily suspended foreclosures and evictions in order to investigate improprieties.When details of the 2010 United States foreclosure crisis were publicized in 2010, notably robo-signing, Axelrod was widely criticized for downplaying the magnitude of the crisis in his comments to the press,[53][54] telling the audience of CBS News' Face the Nation that the Obama administration's "hope is this moves rapidly and that this gets unwound very, very quickly" and that he's "not sure that a national moratorium" is called for since "there are in fact valid foreclosures that probably should go forward."[55] Notably, Axelrod made this statement after several banks had voluntarily suspended foreclosures and evictions in order to investigate improprieties.[56]

Barack Obama presidential campaign, 2012

Institute of Politics at the University of Chicago, where he serves as director.[58] On January 23, 2013, La Stampa reported that Axelrod was helping Italian prime minister Mario Monti with his election campaign and had flown to Italy to meet with Monti ten days earlier.[59] Monti's coalition went on to come fourth with 10.5% of the vote in the Italian general election, 2013. On February 19, 2013, Axelrod joined NBC News and MSNBC as a senior political analyst,[citation needed] a position he held until September 2015 when he moved to CNN.

In 2014 Axelrod was appointed senior strategic adviser to the British Labour Party to assist party leader Ed Miliband in the run-up to the 2015 general election.[60]

He is the co-founder of AKPD Message and Media, along with Eric Sedler, and operated ASK Public Strategies, now called ASGK Public Strategies, which were sold in 2009. In Feb. 2015 Axelrod's book Believer: My Forty Years in Politics was published.[61][failed verification]

In 2015, Axelrod began hosting a podcast titled The Axe Files, a series of in-depth discussions and interviews with various political figures.[62] In June of 2019[63] he started the podcast Hacks on Tap with co-host Labour Party to assist party leader Ed Miliband in the run-up to the 2015 general election.[60]

He is the co-founder of AKPD Message and Media, along with Eric Sedler, and operated ASK Public Strategies, now called ASGK Public Strategies, which were sold in 2009. In Feb. 2015 Axelrod's book Believer: My Forty Years in Politics was published.[61][failed verification]

In 2015, Axelrod began hosting a podcast titled The Axe Files, a series of in-depth discussions and interviews with various political figures.[62] In June of 2019[63] he started the podcast Hacks on Tap with co-host Mike Murphy, a show where the two discuss news and updates from the 2020 presidential campaign trail.[64] He also joined CNN as a senior political commentator in September, 2015.[65]

In 2018, Axelrod vocally opposed Democratic support for impeachment, arguing that if "we “normalize” impeachment as a political tool, it will be another hammer blow to our democracy".[66]