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CES (formerly an initialism for Consumer Electronics Show[1]) is an annual trade show organized by the Consumer Technology Association (CTA). Held in January at the Las Vegas Convention Center in Las Vegas, Nevada, United States, the event typically hosts presentations of new products and technologies in the consumer electronics industry.

CES Sign

The winter show was successfully held in Las Vegas in 1995 as planned.[3] However, since the summer Chicago shows were beginning to lose popularity, the organizers decided to experiment by having the show travel around to different cities starting in 1995 with a planned show in Philadelphia at the Pennsylvania Convention Center.[citation needed] However, the inaugural E3 gaming show was scheduled to be held on the West Coast in May and proved a source of increasing competition, causing the Philadelphia Summer CES show to be cancelled.[4] The 1996 Winter show was again held in Las Vegas in January,[5][6] followed by a Summer show this time in Orlando, Florida, however only a fraction of the traditional exhibitors participated.[6] Again, the 1997 Winter show in Las Vegas was very successful. The next "Summer" show was scheduled to be held in conjunction with Spring COMDEX in Atlanta, however when only two dozen-or-so exhibitors signed on, the CES portion of the show was cancelled.

In 1998, the show changed to a once-a-year format with Las Vegas as the location. In Las Vegas, the show is one of the largest (the other being CONEXPO-CON/AGG), taking up to 18 days to set up, run and break down.[7]

Show highlights

1960s

1967

The first CES was held in New York City from June 24 to 28, 1967. The 200 exhibitors attracted 17,500 attendees to the Hilton and Americana hotels over those four days. On view: the latest pocket radios and TVs with integrated circuits.[8]

1970s

1970

Philips unveiled the first-ever home VCR, the N1500 videocassette recorder. Until that point, VCRs cost upward of $50,000 and were used mainly by TV stations, but the Philips model with a built-in tuner was just $900.[9]

1976

Winter CES held January 7–9 in Chicago, at the Conrad Hilton Hotel. Per the show guide, it included video (with television receivers and video systems panels), audio (including CB radio, radio, audio compacts, audio components, and tape equipment panels), and calculator and watch areas, considered separate component conferences. Speakers included the FTC's Joan Bernstein on "The Warranty Law -- Its Status and Impact," and the FCC's Richard M. Smith on "Regulating Citizens' Band Radios."

Summer CES held June 13–16 also in Chicago, at McCormick Place.

1979

1960s

1970

Philips unveiled the first-ever home VCR, the N1500 videocassette recorder. Until that point, VCRs cost upward of $50,000 and were used mainly by TV stations, but the Philips model with a built-in tuner was just $900.

Philips unveiled the first-ever home VCR, the N1500 videocassette recorder. Until that point, VCRs cost upward of $50,000 and were used mainly by TV stations, but the Philips model with a built-in tuner was just $900.[9]

1976

Winter CES held January 7–9 in Chicago, at the Conrad Hilton Hotel. Per the show guide, it included vid

Winter CES held January 7–9 in Chicago, at the Conrad Hilton Hotel. Per the show guide, it included video (with television receivers and video systems panels), audio (including CB radio, radio, audio compacts, audio components, and tape equipment panels), and calculator and watch areas, considered separate component conferences. Speakers included the FTC's Joan Bernstein on "The Warranty Law -- Its Status and Impact," and the FCC's Richard M. Smith on "Regulating Citizens' Band Radios."

Summer CES held June 13–16 also in Chicago, at McCormick Place.

1979

Summer CES June 6 at Chicago saw the first appearance of Commodore 64 and General Consumer Electronics' (GCE) Vectrex.Summer CES June 6 at Chicago saw the first appearance of Commodore 64 and General Consumer Electronics' (GCE) Vectrex.[11]

1984

Japanese jazz fusion artist, Ryo Kawasaki, performed with the Commodore 64 at the Summer CES (June 3–June 6 at Chicago) as a demo for the Kawasaki Synthesizer.[12]

1985

At Summer CES. Nintendo unveiled the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES), the American version of its Famicom, with a new case redesigned by Lance Barr and featuring a "zero insertion force" cartridge slot.[13]

1990s

1991

In Summer CES, Sony revealed a Super Famicom with a built-in CD-ROM drive, that incorporated Green Book technology or CD-i, called "Play Station" (also known as SNES-CD). However, a day after the announcement at CES, Nintendo announced that it would be breaking its partnership with Sony, opting to go with Philips instead while using the same technology.[14][15]

Winter CES saw unveiling of Game Gear.[16] Games for NEC's TurboGrafx-16, Game Gear.[16] Games for NEC's TurboGrafx-16, Sega Genesis, and SNK's Neo-Geo took center stage [17]

In the summer CES held in Chicago and dominated by video game products,[18] Apple Inc. unveiled off its Newton MessagePad.[19] First recorders introduced for the two rival digital systems targeted as replacements for the Philips Compact Cassette analog audio tape system: MiniDisc created by Sony and Digital Compact Cassette (DCC), created by Philips and Matsushita.[20][21]

1993

In a one-time experiment, the Summer CES 1993 was open to the general public.[22]

Major announcements during this edition were: