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Keyes at a 2008 presidential campaign rally

On December 12, 2007, Keyes participated in the Des Moines Register's Republican presidential debate, televised nationwide by PBS and the cable news networks. This was the first major presidential debate in which Keyes participated during the 2008 election season and the last Republican debate before the Iowa Caucuses.[69][70] Although Keyes was not listed on the latest national CNN poll leading up to the debate,[71] he registered with at least 1 percent of the Iowa vote in order to participate.[72] During the debate, after the moderator began to ask a question of Texas Congressman Ron Paul, Keyes insisted he was not getting fair treatment. He interrupted the debate moderator at one point, saying that she had not called on him in several rounds and that he had to make an issue of it.[73] He went on the offensive against his opponents during the debate, criticizing Rudy Giuliani's pro-abortion rights position, as well as Mitt Romney's recent change in position on the same subject. In answering a question about global warming, he continued his criticisms of other candidates, saying, "I'm in favor of reducing global warming, because I think the most important emission we need to control is the hot air emission of politicians who pretend one thing and don't deliver".[70] He also advocated ending the income tax, establishing state-sanctioned prayer in public schools, and abolishing abortion.[73] Toward the end of the debate, Keyes stated he could not support Giuliani if he were to win the nomination due to the former New York mayor's position on abortion.[74]

In the Iowa caucuses, Keyes did not appear on any of the election totals.[75] Keyes stated that many of the caucus locations he visited did not list him as a choice. His campaign CEO, Stephen Stone blamed much of this on the media and on Keyes's decision to enter the race late. Stone explained that the media would not acknowledge Keyes's candidacy, making it difficult to run an effective campaign.[75]

Keyes supports an amendment to the Constitution barring same-sex marriage.[76] He stated he would not have gone to war in Iraq,[77] but also said that the war was justified[78] and defended President George W. Bush's decision in one of his 2004 debates.[79] Keyes has stated that troops should stay in Iraq,[80] but also said that he would have turned over operations to the United Nations.[81] However, Keyes has also stated that even while he was an ambassador there he was not a supporter of the United Nations.Des Moines Register's Republican presidential debate, televised nationwide by PBS and the cable news networks. This was the first major presidential debate in which Keyes participated during the 2008 election season and the last Republican debate before the Iowa Caucuses.[69][70] Although Keyes was not listed on the latest national CNN poll leading up to the debate,[71] he registered with at least 1 percent of the Iowa vote in order to participate.[72] During the debate, after the moderator began to ask a question of Texas Congressman Ron Paul, Keyes insisted he was not getting fair treatment. He interrupted the debate moderator at one point, saying that she had not called on him in several rounds and that he had to make an issue of it.[73] He went on the offensive against his opponents during the debate, criticizing Rudy Giuliani's pro-abortion rights position, as well as Mitt Romney's recent change in position on the same subject. In answering a question about global warming, he continued his criticisms of other candidates, saying, "I'm in favor of reducing global warming, because I think the most important emission we need to control is the hot air emission of politicians who pretend one thing and don't deliver".[70] He also advocated ending the income tax, establishing state-sanctioned prayer in public schools, and abolishing abortion.[73] Toward the end of the debate, Keyes stated he could not support Giuliani if he were to win the nomination due to the former New York mayor's position on abortion.[74]

In the Iowa caucuses, Keyes did not appear on any of the election totals.[75] Keyes stated that many of the caucus locations he visited did not list him as a choice. His campaign CEO, Stephen Stone blamed much of this on the media and on Keyes's decision to enter the race late. Stone explained that the media would not acknowledge Keyes's candidacy, making it difficult to run an effective campaign.[75]

Keyes supports an In the Iowa caucuses, Keyes did not appear on any of the election totals.[75] Keyes stated that many of the caucus locations he visited did not list him as a choice. His campaign CEO, Stephen Stone blamed much of this on the media and on Keyes's decision to enter the race late. Stone explained that the media would not acknowledge Keyes's candidacy, making it difficult to run an effective campaign.[75]

Keyes supports an amendment to the Constitution barring same-sex marriage.[76] He stated he would not have gone to war in Iraq,[77] but also said that the war was justified[78] and defended President George W. Bush's decision in one of his 2004 debates.[79] Keyes has stated that troops should stay in Iraq,[80] but also said that he would have turned over operations to the United Nations.[81] However, Keyes has also stated that even while he was an ambassador there he was not a supporter of the United Nations.[82]

After the early states, Keyes exclusively campaigned in Texas,[83] where he finished with 0.60 percent of all votes cast.[84]

Following Texas, the Keyes campaign moved to seeking the Constitution Party presidential nomination, but he continued to appear on several Republican ballots. On May 6, Keyes scored his best showing of the campaign by winning 2.7% for fourth place in North Carolina, earning him two delegates to the Republican National Convention.[citation needed]

Keyes first stated that he was considering leaving the Republican Party during a January 2008 appearance on The Weekly Filibuster radio show.[85] He did not withdraw his candidacy after John McCain won the necessary 1,191 delegates to the Republican National Convention, even though he was no longer campaigning for the Republican nomination.[83] On March 27, 2008, Keyes's campaign website began displaying the Constitution Party's logo, along with a parody of the trademarked GOP logo in the form of a dead elephant.[86] This appeared to be an indication of Keyes's intentions to quit the Republican party and to begin officially seeking the Constitution Party's presidential nomination.

On April 15, Keyes confirmed his split from the Republican Party and his intention to explore the candidacy of the Constitution Party.[87][88] He lost his bid for the party's nomination, however, coming in second to 2004 CP vice presidential candidate Chuck Baldwin at the party's national convention in Kansas City, Missouri, on April 26, 2008.[89] During the convention, the party's founder, Howard Phillips, gave a controversial speech in which he referred to Keyes as "the Neocon candidate" who "lingered in the Republican Party until a week ago."[90] Following the defeat, Keyes held an interview with Mike Ferguson[91] in which he compared his defeat to an abortion.[92] Later, Keyes told a group of his supporters that he was "prayerfully considering" making a continued bid for the presidency as an independent candidate,[93] and asserted his refusal to endorse Baldwin's candidacy.[94]

Keyes' supporters formed a new third party, America's Independent Party, for his presidential candidacy. America's Independent Party gained the affiliation of a faction of California's American Independent Party. However, the AIP ticket, which had Brian Rohrbough, father of a victim of the Columbine High School massacre, of Colorado as its vice presidential candidate, was only on the ballot in California, Colorado, and Florida.[citation needed]

In the federal election held on November 4, 2008, Keyes received 47,694 votes nationally to finish seventh.[95] About 86% (40,673) of the votes he received were cast in California.[citation needed]

On November 14, 2008, Keyes filed a lawsuit—naming as defendants California Secretary of State Deborah Bowen, President-elect Barack Obama, Vice President-elect Joe Biden, and California's 55 Democratic electors[96][97]—challenging Obama's eligibility for the U.S. presidency. The suit requested that Obama provide documentation that he is a natural born citizen of the United States.[98][99]

Following the inauguration, Keyes alleged that President Obama had not been constitutionally inaugurated, refused to call him president, and called him a "usurper" and a "radical communist".[100][101] Keyes also claimed that President Obama's birth certificate had been forged and he was not qualified to be president.Following the inauguration, Keyes alleged that President Obama had not been constitutionally inaugurated, refused to call him president, and called him a "usurper" and a "radical communist".[100][101] Keyes also claimed that President Obama's birth certificate had been forged and he was not qualified to be president.[102]

Keyes has worked as a media commentator and talk show personality. In 1994, he began hosting a syndicated radio show called The Alan Keyes Show: America's Wake-Up Call for Radio America from Arlington, Virginia. The show became simulcast on cable's National Empowerment Television in 1997.[103] Keyes also launched various web-based organizations—notably Renew America and the Declaration Foundation, both headquartered in Washington, D.C.[citation needed]

Keyes has served on the board of advisors for the Catholic League, a non-profit, Catholic advocacy group headed by William A. Donohue. In 1997, he was quoted as calling in that capacity the ABC television show Nothing Sacred "propaganda dressed up as entertainment, the way the Nazis used to make movies. The entertainment elite's belief that there are no moral absolutes deeply contradicts the religious view of Christianity."[104]

In 2002, he hosted a live television commentary show, Alan Keyes Is Making Sense, on the MSNBC cable news channel.[105] The network canceled the show in July, ci

Keyes has served on the board of advisors for the Catholic League, a non-profit, Catholic advocacy group headed by William A. Donohue. In 1997, he was quoted as calling in that capacity the ABC television show Nothing Sacred "propaganda dressed up as entertainment, the way the Nazis used to make movies. The entertainment elite's belief that there are no moral absolutes deeply contradicts the religious view of Christianity."[104]

In 2002, he hosted a live television commentary show, Alan Keyes Is Making Sense, on the MSNBC cable news channel.[105] The network canceled the show in July, citing poor ratings. The cancellation triggered a currently ongoing boycott led by Jewish education website Mesora.org whose reach numbers more than 72,000 email subscribers.[106] The show was unsympathetic to supporters of the al-Aqsa Intifadah—whom Keyes frequently debated on the program—and supported the Israeli crackdown on Palestinians. The show also featured critical discussion of homosexuality and of priests accused in the Catholic Church sex abuse scandals. The last episode was broadcast on June 27, 2002. As a result of Keyes's strong advocacy of Israel on his MSNBC show, in July 2002 the state of Israel awarded him a special honor "in appreciation of his journalistic endeavors and his integrity in reporting" and flew him in to meet Prime Minister Ariel Sharon.[107]

In August 2003, Keyes came out in defense of Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore, citing both the U.S. Constitution and the Alabama constitution as sanctioning Moore's (and Alabama's) authority to publicly display the Ten Commandments in the state's judicial building, in defiance of a court order from U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson.[108][109] Although the monument was ultimately removed by state authorities, the issue impelled Keyes to spend the next year advocating his understanding of the Constitution's protection of the right of states to display monuments that reflect the religious sentiments of the people in their states. As a result, he published an essay describing his rationale titled "On the establishment of religion: What the Constitution really says."[110]

In early 2005, Keyes sought to intervene in the Terri Schiavo case, arguing that Schiavo's life was protected by the Florida constitution, and that Governor Jeb Bush had final authority to determine the outcome of the case under state provisions. He attempted to meet with Bush to discuss the provisions of Florida law that authorized the governor to order Schiavo's feeding tubes reinserted—something Bush claimed he wished to do, but for which he said he lacked authority—but the governor declined to meet with Keyes. Keyes subsequently wrote an essay directed openly at Governor Bush titled "Judicial review and executive responsibility",[111] days after Schiavo's feeding tube had been removed.[citation needed]

Keyes appeared in the 2006 mockumentary film Borat as an unwitting interviewee of Borat Sagdiyev (a character portrayed by Sacha Baron Cohen).[112][113]

In November 2006, Keyes criticized Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney for instituting same-sex marriage entirely on his own—according to Keyes—with no requirement or authority to do so under Massachusetts law. Keyes said Romney's actions, which he suggested were due to a complete misunderstanding of his role as governor and of the limitations of the judicial branch of government, were not necessitated by a ruling of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court in November 2003 that directed the state legislature to institute same-sex marriage. The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial court had ruled that the state law banning same-sex marriage was not constitutional.[114] The court gave the Massachusetts Legislature 180 days to modify the law; after it failed to do so, Romney ordered town clerks to begin issuing marriage licenses on May 17, 2004, in compliance with the court ruling.[115] Commenting on the issue, Keyes asked rhetorically, "Since the legislature has not acted on the subject, you might be wondering how it is that homosexuals are being married in Massachusetts. It's because Mitt Romney, who is telling people he's an opponent of same-sex marriage, forced the justices of the peace and others to perform same-sex marriage, all on his own, with no authorization or requirement from the court. Tells you how twisted our politicians have become."[116]

Keyes, Olavo de Carvalho, author of a dozen books on philosophical and political matters, and Alejandro Peña Esclusa, president of UnoAmerica, met on March 3, 2009 in Washington D.C. for an informal and friendly talk.[117] In July 2010, Olavo de Carvalho denounced a plot against Alejandro Peña Esclusa, who was arrested on terrorism-related charges.[118] According to the website of the Venezuelan Ministry of Communications & Information, Alejandro Peña Esclusa was the head of a plan to murder Pope John Paul II during a visit to Venezuela on November 13, 1984.[citation needed]

On May 8, 2009, Keyes and 21 others were arrested while protesting President Barack Obama's commencement speech at the University of Notre Dame. Keyes was charged with trespassing and released on $250 bond.[119] He was arrested a second time on May 16.[120]

In 2010, About.com, owned by The New York Times Company, named Keyes one of the top 20 conservatives to follow on Twitter.[121]

During the time of the 2016 presidential election, Keyes emerged as a strong critic

On May 8, 2009, Keyes and 21 others were arrested while protesting President Barack Obama's commencement speech at the University of Notre Dame. Keyes was charged with trespassing and released on $250 bond.[119] He was arrested a second time on May 16.[120]

In 2010, About.com, owned by The New York Times Company, named Keyes one of the top 20 conservatives to follow on Twitter.[121]

During the time of the 2016 presidential election, Keyes emerged as a strong critic of Donald Trump. He criticized many conservative Christians for supporting "a candidate whose life could be used to illustrate the deceitfully seductive quality of sin summarized in the phrase 'the glamour of evil.'"[122] After Trump's election, Keyes both criticized[123][124][125] and praised[126][127][128] Trump and various policies he pursued.

Keyes has actively promoted the use of Mineral Miracle Supplement (MMS) in both the United States and Uganda.[129] One of the products featured by Keyes, made by a company called Genesis II, had its sales blocked in April 2020 by a federal court order.[130]