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Sunday School
A Sunday school is an educational institution, usually (but not always) Christian in character. Sunday school classes usually precede a Sunday church service and are used to provide catechesis to Christians, especially children and teenagers, and oftentimes adults as well. Churches of many Christian denominations have classrooms attached to the church used for this purpose. Many Sunday school classes operate on a set curriculum, with some teaching attendees a catechism. Members often receive certificates and awards for participation, as well as attendance. Due to the fact that Sunday school classes precede morning worship on the Lord's Day, many provide a light breakfast, such as doughnuts and coffee, except on days in which Holy Communion is being celebrated due to the fact that many Christian denominations encourage fasting before receiving the Eucharistic elements. Sunday schools were first set up in the 18th century in England to provide education to working children. William ...
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Infant
222x222px|Eight-month-old sororal twin sisters An infant (from the Latin word ''infans'', meaning 'unable to speak' or 'speechless') is the more formal or specialised synonym for the common term ''baby'', meaning the very young offspring of human beings. The term may also be used to refer to juveniles of other organisms. A newborn is, in colloquial use, an infant who is only hours, days, or up to one month old. In medical contexts, newborn or neonate (from Latin, ''neonatus'', newborn) refers to an infant in the first 28 days after birth; the term applies to premature, full term, and postmature infants. Before birth, the term ''fetus'' is used. The term ''infant'' is typically applied to very young children under one year of age; however, definitions may vary and may include children up to two years of age. When a human child learns to walk, the term ''toddler'' may be used instead. Other uses In British English, an ''infant school'' is for children aged between four and ...
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Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire (), abbreviated Bucks, is a ceremonial county in South East England that borders Greater London to the south-east, Berkshire to the south, Oxfordshire to the west, Northamptonshire to the north, Bedfordshire to the north-east and Hertfordshire to the east. Buckinghamshire is one of the Home Counties, the counties of England that surround Greater London. Towns such as High Wycombe, Amersham, Chesham and the Chalfonts in the east and southeast of the county are parts of the London commuter belt, forming some of the most densely populated parts of the county. Development in this region is restricted by the Metropolitan Green Belt. Other large settlements include the county town of Aylesbury, Marlow in the south near the Thames and Princes Risborough in the west near Oxford. Some areas without direct rail links to London, such as around the old county town of Buckingham and near Olney in the northeast, are much less populous. The largest town is Milton Keynes in the ...
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High Wycombe
High Wycombe, often referred to as Wycombe ( ), is a large market town in Buckinghamshire, England. Lying in the valley of the River Wye surrounded by the Chiltern Hills, it is west-northwest of Charing Cross in London; this information is also engraved on the Corn Market building in the centre of the town. It is also south-southeast of the county town of Aylesbury, southeast of Oxford, northeast of Reading and north of Maidenhead. According to the ONS official estimates for 2016, High Wycombe has a population of 125,257 and it is the second largest town in the county of Buckinghamshire after Milton Keynes. High Wycombe Urban Area, the conurbation of which the town is the largest component, has a population of 133,204. High Wycombe is mostly an unparished area. Part of the urban area constitutes the civil parish of Chepping Wycombe, which had a population of 14,455 according to the 2001 census – this parish represents that part of the ancient parish of Chepping Wycom ...
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Hannah Ball
Hannah Ball (1734–1792) was an English Wesleyan methodist and pioneer of the Sunday school. Life Ball was born on 13 March 1734. When John Wesley and other Methodist preachers visited High Wycombe, in Bucks where she lived for most of her life, she was attracted by their teaching. In 1766 she began to keep a diary, some extracts of which have been published. Several of the letters that passed between her and Wesley have also been printed. By Wesley's advice she broke off an engagement to be married to one who, in the language of the sect, was 'an ungodly man.' She was a mystic, and Wesley warns her that 'a clear revelation of several persons in the ever blessed Trinity was by no means a sure trial to Christian perfection.' Hannah Ball died on 16 August 1792. Sunday schools In 1769 she began a Sunday school. It was continued by her sister Anne, was reorganised in 1801, and lasted late into the nineteenth century. The germ of the modern Sunday school may be traced in the methods o ...
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St Mary's Church, Nottingham
The Church of St Mary the Virgin is the oldest religious foundationDomesday Book: A Complete Translation (Penguin Classics) in the City of Nottingham, England, the largest church after the Roman Catholic Cathedral in Nottingham and the largest mediaeval building in the city. The church is Grade I listed by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport as a building of outstanding architectural or historic interest. It is one of only five Grade I listed buildings in the City of Nottingham. It is situated on High Pavement at the heart of the historic Lace Market district and is also known as ''St Mary's in the Lace Market''. It is a member of the Major Churches Network, and part of the parish of All Saints', St Mary's and St Peter's, Nottingham. History The church is mentioned in the Domesday Book and is believed to go back deep into Saxon times. The main body of the present building (at least the third on the site) dates from the end of the reign of Edward III (1377) to t ...
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Youth Ministry
Youth ministry, also commonly referred to as youth group, is an age-specific religious ministry of faith groups or other religious organizations, usually from ages 12 to 30, whose mission is to involve and engage with young people who attend their places of worship, or who live in their community. Christian youth ministry usually encompasses one or more of the following: * encouraging young people (whether they have professed a faith or not) to learn more about a given faith and to become more involved in spiritual life * providing open youth clubs or other activities for the common good of the young people, sometimes without an overtly religious agenda The doctrine of Sunday Sabbatarianism held by many Christian denominations encourages practices such as Sunday School attendance as it teaches that the entirety of the Lord's Day should be devoted to God; as such many children and teenagers often return to church in the late afternoon for youth group before attending an evening ser ...
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Sunday Sabbatarianism
Sabbatarianism advocates the observation of the Sabbath in Christianity, in keeping with the Ten Commandments. The observance of Sunday as a day of worship and rest is a form of first-day Sabbatarianism, a view which was historically heralded by nonconformist denominations, such as Congregationalists, Presbyterians, Methodists, and Baptists, as well as many Episcopalians. Among Sunday Sabbatarians (First-day Sabbatarians), observance of the Lord's Day often takes the form of attending the Sunday morning service of worship, receiving catechesis through Sunday School, performing acts of mercy (such as evangelism, visiting prisoners in jails and seeing the sick at hospitals), and attending the Sunday evening service of worship, as well as refraining from Sunday shopping, servile work, playing sports, viewing the television, and dining at restaurants. The impact of first-day Sabbatarianism on Western culture is manifested by practices such as Sunday blue laws. Seventh-day Sabbataria ...
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Confirmation
A woodcut depicting the confirmation of Lutheran youth In Christian denominations that practice infant baptism, confirmation is seen as the sealing of the covenant created in baptism. It is an affirmation of commitment and belief. Those being confirmed are known as confirmands. Roman Catholicism, Eastern Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy and Oriental Orthodoxy view confirmation as a sacrament. In the East it is conferred immediately after baptism. In the West, this practice is usually followed when adults are baptized, but in the case of infants not in danger of death it is administered, ordinarily by a bishop, only when the child reaches the age of reason or early adolescence. Among those Christians who practice teen-aged confirmation, the practice may be perceived, secondarily, as a "coming of age" rite. In many Protestant denominations, such as the Anglican, Lutheran, Methodist and Reformed traditions, confirmation is a rite that often includes a profession of faith by an alread ...
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First Communion
First Communion is a ceremony in some Christian traditions during which a person first receives the Eucharist. It is most common in many parts of the Latin Church tradition of the Catholic Church, Lutheran Church and Anglican Communion (other ecclesiastical provinces of these denominations administer a congregant's First Communion after he/she receives confirmation). In churches that celebrate First Communion, it typically occurs between the ages of seven and thirteen, often acting as a rite of passage. In other denominations, such as the Methodist Church in India, one's first communion ordinarily follows the reception of confirmation, which occurs after the age of ten; Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox Christians first receive the sacrament of Holy Communion in infancy, along with Holy Baptism and Chrismation. Characteristics Catholics believe this event to be very important, as the Eucharist occupies a central role in Catholic theology and practice. First Communion is not c ...
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Rite
A rite is an established, ceremonial, usually religious, act. Rites in this sense fall into three major categories: * rites of passage, generally changing an individual's social status, such as marriage, adoption, baptism, coming of age, graduation, or inauguration; * communal rites, whether of worship, where a community comes together to worship, such as Jewish synagogue or Mass, or of another character, such as fertility rites and certain non-religious festivals; * rites of personal devotion, where an individual worships, including prayer and pilgrimages, pledges of allegiance, or promises to wed someone. Christianity Catholicism and Orthodoxy Within the Catholic Church, "rite" often refers to what is also called a sacrament and respective liturgies based on liturgical languages and traditional local customs as well as the ceremonies associated with the sacraments. In Christian Catholicism, for example, the sacrament of Anointing of the Sick/Last Rites is one of the sacramental ...
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Stockport Sunday School
The Stockport Sunday School is a Sunday school in Stockport, Manchester, England. Founded in 1784, it had become the largest Sunday school in the world by 1859. The original school was situated on London Square, Wellington Street, Stockport, behind the town hall. Before the days of universal education, children would be employed in the cotton and hatting industry from a very early age, Sunday Schools provided the one source of Education available before the passing of the 1870 Education Act. The school still exists today on Nangreave Rd in Heaviley, though it is far reduced in size. Foundation The Sunday School was founded in 1784, the articles of association being adopted on 11 November 1784. The aim was that the town be divided into six, and an establishment provided for each division. Two subscribers should visit each school and report back to the committee. Scholars should attend from 9 to 12 in the morning, and from 1 to 6 in the afternoon, of which part would be attending a chu ...
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Education Act 1870
The Elementary Education Act 1870, commonly known as Forster's Education Act, set the framework for schooling of all children between the ages of 5 and 12 in England and Wales. It established local education authorities with defined powers, authorized public money to improve existing schools, and tried to frame conditions attached to this aid so as to earn the goodwill of managers. It has long been seen as a milestone in educational development, but recent commentators have stressed that it brought neither free nor compulsory education, and its importance has thus tended to be diminished rather than increased.Nigel Middleton, "The Education Act of 1870 as the Start of the Modern Concept of the Child." British Journal of Educational Studies 18.2 (1970): 166-179. The law was drafted by William Forster, a Liberal MP, and it was introduced on 17 February 1870 after campaigning by the National Education League, although not entirely to their requirements. In Birmingham, Joseph Chamberl ...
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Anglican
Anglicanism is a Western Christian tradition that has developed from the practices, liturgy, and identity of the Church of England following the English Reformation. Adherents of Anglicanism are called ''Anglicans''; they are also called ''Episcopalians'' in some countries. The majority of Anglicans are members of national or regional ecclesiastical provinces of the international Anglican Communion, which forms the third-largest Christian communion in the world, after the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church. These provinces are in full communion with the See of Canterbury and thus with the British Monarch’s personal choice of the Archbishop of Canterbury, whom the communion refers to as its ''primus inter pares'' (Latin, 'first among equals'). The Archbishop calls the decennial Lambeth Conference, chairs the meeting of primates, and is the president of the Anglican Consultative Council.The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church by F. L. Cross (Editor), E ...
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