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Church School
in Finland. A Christian school is a school run on Christian principles or by a Christian organization. The nature of Christian schools varies enormously from country to country, according to the religious, educational, and political cultures. In some countries, there is a strict separation of church and state, so all religious schools are private; in others, there is an established church whose teachings form an integral part of the state-operated educational system; in yet others, the state subsidizes religious schools of various denominations. North America United States In the United States, religion is generally not taught by state-funded educational systems, though schools must allow students wanting to study religion to do so as an extracurricular activity, as they would with any other such activity. Over 4 million students, about 1 child in 12, attend religious schools, most of them Christian. There is great variety in the educational and religious philosophies of these ...
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Protestant
Protestantism is a form of Christianity that originated with the 16th-century Reformation, a movement against what its followers perceived to be errors in the Catholic Church. Protestants reject the Roman Catholic doctrine of papal supremacy and sacraments, but disagree among themselves regarding the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist, and matters of ecclesiastical polity and apostolic succession. They emphasize the priesthood of all believers; justification by faith alone (') rather than by good works; the teaching that salvation comes by divine grace or "unmerited favor" only, not as something merited ('); and affirm the Bible as being the sole highest authority (' or scripture alone), rather than also with sacred tradition. The five ''solae'' summarise basic theological differences in opposition to the Catholic Church. Protestantism began in Germany). in 1517, when Martin Luther published his ''Ninety-five Theses'' as a reaction against abuses in the sale of indulgences b ...
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School Choice
"School choice" is a term for pre-college public education options, describing a wide array of programs offering students and their families voluntary alternatives to publicly provided schools, to which students are generally assigned by the location of their family residence. In the United States, the most common—both by number of programs and by number of participating students—school choice programs are scholarship tax credit programs, which allow individuals or corporations to receive tax credits toward their state taxes in exchange for donations made to non-profit organizations that grant private school scholarships. In other cases, a similar subsidy may be provided by the state through a school voucher program. Other school choice options include open enrollment laws (which allow students to attend public schools outside the district in which the students live), charter schools, magnet schools, virtual schools, homeschooling, education savings accounts (ESAs), and individua ...
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Protestantism In The United States
Protestantism is the largest grouping of Christians in the United States, with its combined denominations collectively comprising about 43% of the country's population (or 141 million people) in 2019. Simultaneously, this corresponds to around 20% of the world's total Protestant population. The U.S. contains the largest Protestant population of any country in the world. Baptists comprise about one-third of American Protestants. The Southern Baptist Convention is the largest single Protestant denomination in the U.S., comprising one-tenth of American Protestants. Twelve of the original Thirteen Colonies were Protestant; Maryland was the only Catholic one. The country's history is often traced back to the Pilgrim Fathers whose Brownist beliefs motivated their move from England to the New World. These English dissenters, who also happened to be Puritans—and therefore—Calvinists, were first to settle in what was to become the Plymouth Colony. America's Calvinist heritage is often u ...
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Conservatism In The United States
Conservatism in the United States is a political and social philosophy which characteristically shows respect for American traditions, republicanism, and limited government. It typically supports Judeo-Christian values, moral universalism, American exceptionalism, and individualism. It is generally pro-capitalist and pro-business while opposing trade unions. It often advocates for a strong national defense, gun rights, free trade, and a defense of Western culture from perceived threats posed by communism, socialism, and moral relativism. American conservatives generally consider individual liberty—within the bounds of conservative values—as the fundamental trait of democracy. They typically believe in a balance between federal government and states' rights. Apart from some right-libertarians, American conservatives tend to favor strong action in areas they believe to be within government's legitimate jurisdiction, particularly national defense and law enforcement. Social ...
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Ouachita Christian School IMG 2853
Ouachita may refer to: Places In the United States: * Ouachita, Arkansas, an unincorporated community * Ouachita City, Louisiana, an unincorporated community * The Ouachita Mountains in Arkansas and Oklahoma * The Ouachita orogeny, the geologic event that raised the Ouachita Mountains * The Ouachita River in Arkansas and Louisiana * Lake Ouachita * Ouachita County, Arkansas * Ouachita Parish, Louisiana * Ouachita National Forest in Arkansas and Oklahoma * Ouachita National Recreation Trail in Arkansas and Oklahoma Native Americans * The Ouachita people, a Caddo group from northeastern Louisiana Education * Ouachita Baptist University, a private liberal arts institution in Arkansas * Ouachita Hills College, a missionary training college in southwest Arkansas Business * Ouachita Railroad, a Class III short-line railroad headquartered in Arkansas * Ouachita Electric Cooperative, a rural electric utility cooperative Nature * Ouachita Dusky Salamander, a species of salamander * Ouach ...
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Allegheny Wesleyan Methodist Connection
The Allegheny Wesleyan Methodist Connection (AWMC), originally the Wesleyan Methodist Church (Allegheny Conference), and also known as the Wesleyan Methodist Church (WMC), is a Methodist denomination within the conservative holiness movement primarily based in the United States, with missions in Peru, Ghana, and Haiti. History The movement which would become Allegheny Wesleyan Methodist Connection began in the mid-18th century within the Church of England. A small group of students, including John Wesley, Charles Wesley and George Whitefield, met on the Oxford University campus. They focused on Bible study, methodical study of scripture and living a holy life. Other students mocked them, saying they were the "Holy Club" and "the Methodists", being methodical and exceptionally detailed in their Bible study, opinions and disciplined lifestyle. Eventually, the so-called Methodists started individual societies or classes for members of the Church of England who wanted to live a more ...
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The United Methodist Church
The United Methodist Church (UMC) is a worldwide mainline Protestant denomination based in the United States, and a major part of Methodism. In the 19th century, its main predecessor, the Methodist Episcopal Church, was a leader in evangelicalism. The present denomination was founded in 1968 in Dallas, Texas, by union of the Methodist Church and the Evangelical United Brethren Church. The UMC traces its roots back to the revival movement of John and Charles Wesley in England, as well as the Great Awakening in the United States. As such, the church's theological orientation is decidedly Wesleyan. It embraces liturgical worship, holiness, and evangelical elements. The United Methodist Church has a connectional polity, a typical feature of a number of Methodist denominations. It is organized into conferences. The highest level is called the General Conference and is the only organization which may speak officially for the UMC. The church is a member of the World Council of Churches, t ...
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TMI — The Episcopal School Of Texas
TMI Episcopal is a Private School in San Antonio. Previously known as Texas Military Institute, TMI is a selective coeducational Episcopal college preparatory school with a military tradition in San Antonio, Texas for boarding and day students. It is the flagship school, and sole secondary school, of the Episcopal Diocese of West Texas. TMI is the oldest Episcopal college preparatory school in the American Southwest. Founded as West Texas School for Boys, the school was later known as West Texas Military Academy, and popularly nicknamed 'West Point on the Rio Grande', though it is several hours from the Rio Grande itself. History TMI was founded in 1893 by the Rt Revd James Steptoe Johnston, DD, Second Bishop of West Texas in the Protestant Episcopal Church. Johnston was a native Mississippian of the planter class who had participated in twelve engagements in the Civil War. He fought most of these battles with the Eleventh Mississippi Regiment. Johnston's earliest name for his s ...
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Independent School
Share enrolled in private institutions at the tertiary education level (2015) An independent school is independent in its finances and governance. Also known as private schools, non-governmental, privately funded, or non-state schools, they are not administered by local, state or national governments. In British English, an independent school usually refers to a school which is endowed, i.e. held by a trust, charity or foundation, whilst a private school is one which is privately owned. Independent schools are usually not dependent upon national or local government to finance their financial endowment. They typically have a board of governors who are elected independently of government, and have a system of governance that ensures their independent operation. Children who attend such schools may be there because they (or their parents) are dissatisfied with government funded schools (in UK state schools) in their area. They may be selected for their academic prowess, or prowe ...
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University-preparatory School
A college-preparatory school (shortened to preparatory school, prep school, or college prep) is a type of secondary school. The term can refer to public, private independent or parochial schools primarily designed to prepare students for higher education. North America United States In the United States, there are public, private, and charter college preparatory schools and they can be either parochial or secular. Admission is sometimes based on specific selection criteria, usually academic, but some schools have open enrollment. Fewer than 1% of students enrolled in school in the United States attend an independent, private preparatory school, compared to 9% who attend parochial schools and 88% who attend public schools. Public and charter college preparatory schools are typically connected to a local school district and draw from the entire district instead of the closest school zone. Some offer specialized courses or curricula that prepare students for a specific field of s ...
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Groton School
Groton School is a selective private Episcopal college preparatory boarding school located in Groton, Massachusetts, United States. It enrolls about 380 boys and girls, from the eighth through twelfth grades. Tuition, room and board and required fees in 2014–15 amounted to $56,700 (with books extra); 38% of the students receive financial aid. The school is a member of the Independent School League. There are many famous alumni in business, government and the professions, including U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt. For the 2020-21 admissions cycle, Groton School reported an acceptance rate of 9%. History Groton School was founded in 1884 by the Rev. Endicott Peabody, a member of a prominent Massachusetts family and an Episcopal clergyman. The land for the school was donated to Peabody by two brothers, James and Prescott Lawrence, whose family home was located on Farmers Row in Groton, Massachusetts, north of Groton School's present location. Backed by affluent figures of the ...
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National Association Of Episcopal Schools
The National Association of Episcopal Schools (NAES) is a membership organization of approximately 1200 pre-collegiate schools and early childhood education programs in the United States. Membership is restricted to schools owned, operated, or sponsored by bodies of the Episcopal Church, or otherwise operating "under the jurisdiction or operating with the knowledge and consent of the bishop of the diocese in which they are located.". NAES does not accredit, oversee, or govern any of its member schools, and "neither reports to nor is governed by the General Convention of the Episcopal Church.".NAES FAQ
op cit., section "How is NAES related to the Episcopal Church?"

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Episcopal Church (United States)
The Episcopal Church (TEC), based in the United States with additional dioceses elsewhere, is a member church of the worldwide Anglican Communion. It is a mainline Christian denomination and is divided into nine provinces. The presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church is Michael Bruce Curry, the first African-American bishop to serve in that position. the Episcopal Church had 1,798,042 baptized members, of whom 1,637,945 were in the United States. it was the nation's 14th largest denomination. Note: The number of members given here is the total number of baptized members in 2012 (cf. Baptized Members by Province and Diocese 2002–2013). Pew Research estimated that 1.2 percent of the adult population in the United States, or 3 million people, self-identify as mainline Episcopalians. The church was organized after the American Revolution, when it became separate from the Church of England, whose clergy are required to swear allegiance to the British monarch as Supreme Gov ...
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Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod
The Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS), also referred to simply as the Wisconsin Synod, is an American Confessional Lutheran denomination of Christianity. Characterized as theologically conservative, it was founded in 1850 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. As of 2020, it had a baptized membership of 349,014 in 1,269 congregations, with churches in 47 US states and 4 provinces of Canada. The WELS also does gospel outreach in 40 countries around the world. It is the third largest Lutheran denomination in the United States. The WELS school system is the fourth largest private school system in the United States. The WELS is in fellowship with the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) and is a member of the Confessional Evangelical Lutheran Conference (CELC), a worldwide organization of Lutheran church bodies of the same beliefs. Belief and practice Doctrinal standards The WELS subscribes to the Lutheran Reformation teaching of ''Sola scriptura''—"by Scripture alone." It holds that ...
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