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Catholic Schools In The United States
Catholic schools in the United States constitute the largest number of non-public schools in the country. They are accredited by independent and/or state agencies, and teachers are generally certified. Catholic schools are supported primarily through tuition payments and fundraising, and typically enroll students regardless of religious background. History By the middle of the 19th century, the Catholics in larger cities started building their own parochial school system. The main impetus was fear that indoctrination by Protestant teachers in the public schools would lead to a loss of faith. Protestants reacted by strong opposition to any public funding of parochial schools. The Catholics nevertheless built their elementary schools, parish by parish, using very low paid and sisters without college educations as teachers. This was not unlike the public school system, where college-educated teachers became the norm only in the 20th century. By the 2010s there had been a signific ...
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Catholic School
A Catholic school is a parochial school or education ministry of the Catholic Church. , the Catholic Church operates the world's largest non-governmental school system. In 2016, the church supported 43,800 secondary schools, and 95,200 primary schools. Catholic schools strive to cultivate a humane, Christian, and humanitarian ethos, while also participating in the evangelizing mission of the Church, integrating religious education as a core subject within their curriculum. Background Across North America, Europe, United Kingdom and Australia, the main historical driver for the establishment of Catholic schools was Irish immigration. Historically, the establishment of Catholic schools in Europe encountered various struggles following the creation of the Church of England in the Elizabethan Religious settlements of 1558–63. Anti-Catholicism in this period encouraged Catholics to create modern Catholic education systems to preserve their traditions. The Relief Acts of 1782 and the ...
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National Catholic Educational Association
The National Catholic Educational Association (NCEA) is a private, professional educational membership association of over 150,000 educators in Catholic schools, universities, and religious education programs. It is the largest such organization in the world. History NCEA traces its official beginning to a meeting held in St. Louis, Missouri, July 12–14, 1904. At that meeting the separate Catholic education organizations, the Education Conference of Catholic Seminary Faculties (1898), the Association of Catholic Colleges (1899) and the Parish School Conference (1902) agreed to unite as the Catholic Educational Association (CEA). From then until 1919, the CEA was the only unifying agent for Catholic education at the national level. In 1919, the establishment of the National Catholic War Council (NCWC), later changed to National Catholic Welfare Council, to serve as an agency of the American bishops to coordinate all Catholic activity, including education, marked a new era for CEA ...
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Catholic Schools In The United States
Catholic schools in the United States constitute the largest number of non-public schools in the country. They are accredited by independent and/or state agencies, and teachers are generally certified. Catholic schools are supported primarily through tuition payments and fundraising, and typically enroll students regardless of religious background. History By the middle of the 19th century, the Catholics in larger cities started building their own parochial school system. The main impetus was fear that indoctrination by Protestant teachers in the public schools would lead to a loss of faith. Protestants reacted by strong opposition to any public funding of parochial schools. The Catholics nevertheless built their elementary schools, parish by parish, using very low paid and sisters without college educations as teachers. This was not unlike the public school system, where college-educated teachers became the norm only in the 20th century. By the 2010s there had been a signific ...
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Charter School
A charter school is a school that receives government funding but operates independently of the established state school system in which it is located. It is independent in the sense that it operates according to the basic principle of autonomy for accountability, that it is freed from the rules but accountable for results. Public vs. private school There is debate on whether charter schools ought to be described as private schools or state schools. Advocates of the charter model state that they are public schools because they are open to all students and do not charge tuition, while critics cite charter schools' private operation and loose regulations regarding public accountability and labor issues as arguments against the concept. It is also described as a form of public education that is controlled by parents and small constituencies. On the other hand, charter schools are often established, operated, and maintained by for-profit organizations. By country Australia All ...
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Blaine Amendment
The Blaine Amendment was a failed amendment to the U.S. Constitution that would have prohibited direct government aid to educational institutions that have a religious affiliation. Most state constitutions already had such provisions, and thirty-eight of the fifty states have clauses that prohibit taxpayer funding of religious entities in their state constitutions. The measures were designed to deny government aid to parochial schools, especially those operated by the Catholic Church in locations with large immigrant populations. They emerged from a growing consensus among 19th-century U.S. Protestants that public education must be free from “sectarian” or “denominational” control, while it also reflected nativist tendencies hostile to immigrants. Arguments have also been made that the amendments were an explicit attempt by White Supremacists to curb the Catholic Church's willingness to educate African-Americans. The amendments are generally seen as explicitly anti-Cath ...
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Paul Vitello
Paul Vitello is an American journalist who has been writing for a variety of publications since 1972. He wrote an award-winning news column for ''Newsday'' from 1982 to 2005. He currently writes for the religion and obituary sections of ''The New York Times'' and is a lecturer at Stony Brook University's School of Journalism. Biography Vitello was born in Chicago in 1950. He grew up on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. He graduated from the High School of Music & Art (now LaGuardia High School) and Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Before joining the ''Times'' staff in 2005, he wrote about Long Island life for ''Newsday'' for 23 years. His column received the Meyer Berger Award from Columbia University, was named the best newspaper column of the year in New York three times by the Associated Press, and won ''Newsday''s Publisher's Award four times. He shared in ''Newsday''s 1985 John Hancock Award for excellence in business writing and its 1997 Pulitzer Prize for Spot News ...
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Wichita, Kansas
Wichita ( ) is the largest city in the U.S. state of Kansas and the county seat of Sedgwick County. As of 2019, the estimated population of the city was 389,938. Wichita is the principal city of the Wichita metropolitan area which had an estimated population of 644,888 in 2018. Located in south-central Kansas on the Arkansas River, Wichita began as a trading post on the Chisholm Trail in the 1860s and was incorporated as a city in 1870. It became a destination for cattle drives traveling north from Texas to Kansas railroads, earning it the nickname "Cowtown".Miner, Prof. Craig (Wichita State Univ. Dept. of History), ''Wichita: The Magic City'', Wichita Historical Museum Association, Wichita, KS, 1988Howell, Angela and Peg Vines, ''The Insider's Guide to Wichita'', Wichita Eagle & Beacon Publishing, Wichita, KS, 1995 In the 1920s and 1930s, businessmen and aeronautical engineers established aircraft manufacturing companies in Wichita, including Beechcraft, Cessna, and Stearman Ai ...
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Memphis, Tennessee
Memphis is a city along the Mississippi River in southwestern Shelby County, Tennessee, United States. Its 2019 estimated population was 651,073, making it Tennessee's second-most populous city behind Nashville, the nation's 28th-largest, and the largest city proper situated along the Mississippi River. Greater Memphis is the 42nd-largest metropolitan area in the United States, with a population of 1,348,260 in 2017. The city is the anchor of West Tennessee and the greater Mid-South region, which includes portions of neighboring Arkansas, Mississippi, and the Missouri Bootheel. Memphis is the seat of Shelby County, Tennessee's most populous county. One of the more historic and culturally significant cities of the southern United States, Memphis has a wide variety of landscapes and distinct neighborhoods. The first European explorer to visit the area of present-day Memphis was Spanish conquistador Hernando de Soto in 1541 with his expedition into the New World. The high Chickasaw B ...
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Mater Dei
Mater is a formal Latin term for mother and may refer to: Places *Mater, Belgium, a village near Oudenaarde Health care Australia *Mater Health Services, Brisbane, Australia * Mater Health Services North Queensland, which incorporates: ** Mater Hospital Pimlico, Townsville, Queensland, ** Mater Women's and Children's Hospital *Calvary Mater Hospital, Newcastle, New South Wales UK and Ireland *Mater Infirmorum Hospital, Belfast, Northern Ireland *Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland (the best-known hospital in Ireland that is referred to as the Mater) *Mater Private Hospital, Dublin, Ireland Other uses * Mater (''Cars''), a character in the Disney animated film ''Cars'' * ''Mater'', an album by the Slovak composer Vladimír Godár featuring singer Iva Bittová * Mater, a major part of an astrolabe * M.A.T.E.R., a football (soccer) club in Rome See also * Juris Māters (1845–1885), Latvian writer and journalist * Dura mater, the outermost layer of the men ...
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Blaine Amendments
The Blaine Amendment was a failed amendment to the U.S. Constitution that would have prohibited direct government aid to educational institutions that have a religious affiliation. Most state constitutions already had such provisions, and thirty-eight of the fifty states have clauses that prohibit taxpayer funding of religious entities in their state constitutions. The measures were designed to deny government aid to parochial schools, especially those operated by the Catholic Church in locations with large immigrant populations. They emerged from a growing consensus among 19th-century U.S. Protestants that public education must be free from “sectarian” or “denominational” control, while it also reflected nativist tendencies hostile to immigrants. Arguments have also been made that the amendments were an explicit attempt by White Supremacists to curb the Catholic Church's willingness to educate African-Americans. The amendments are generally seen as explicitly anti-Cath ...
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Private School
Private or privates may refer to: Music * "In Private", by Dusty Springfield from the 1990 album ''Reputation'' * Private (band), a Denmark-based band * "Private" (Ryōko Hirosue song), from the 1999 album ''Private'', written and also recorded by Ringo Sheena * "Private" (Vera Blue song), from the 2017 album ''Perennial'' Literature * ''Private'' (novel), 2010 novel by James Patterson * ''Private'' (novel series), young-adult book series launched in 2006 Film and television * ''Private'' (film), 2004 Italian film * ''Private'' (web series), 2009 web series based on the novel series * ''Privates'' (TV series), 2013 BBC One TV series * Private, a character in ''Madagascar'' Other uses * Private (rank), a military rank * ''Privates'' (video game), 2010 video game * Private (rocket), American multistage rocket * Private Media Group, Swedish adult entertainment production and distribution company, or their flagship magazine, ''Private'' * Privates, or Intimate parts, a euphemism for ...
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Parochial School
A parochial school is a private primary or secondary school affiliated with a religious organization, and whose curriculum includes general religious education in addition to secular subjects, such as science, mathematics and language arts. The word "parochial" comes from the same root as "parish", and parochial schools were originally the educational wing of the local parish church. Christian parochial schools are often called "church schools" or "Christian schools". In Ontario, parochial schools are called "separate schools". In addition to schools run by Christian organizations, there are also religious schools affiliated with Jewish, Muslim and other groups. These, however, are not usually called "parochial" because of the term's historical association with Christian parishes. United Kingdom In British education, parish schools from the established church of the relevant constituent country formed the basis of the state-funded education system, and many schools retain a churc ...
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Religious Institute
A religious institute is a type of institute of consecrated life in the Catholic Church where its members take religious vows and lead a life in community with fellow members. Religious institutes are one of the two types of institutes of consecrated life; the other is that of the secular institute, where its members are "living in the world". Societies of apostolic life resemble religious institutes in that its members live in community, but differ as their members do not take religious vows. They pursue the apostolic purpose of the society to which they belong, while leading a life in common as brothers or sisters and striving for the perfection of charity through observing the society's constitutions. In some of these societies the members assume the evangelical counsels by a bond other than that of religious vows defined in their constitutions. Categorization Since each and every religious institute has its own unique aim, or charism, it has to adhere to a particular way of ...
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Diocese
In church governance, a diocese or bishopric is the ecclesiastical district under the jurisdiction of a bishop. History In the later organization of the Roman Empire, the increasingly subdivided provinces were administratively associated in a larger unit, the diocese (Latin ''dioecesis'', from the Greek term διοίκησις, meaning "administration"). Christianity was given legal status in 313 with the Edict of Milan. Churches began to organize themselves into dioceses based on the civil dioceses, not on the larger regional imperial districts. These dioceses were often smaller than the provinces. Christianity was declared the Empire's official religion by Theodosius I in 380. Constantine I in 318 gave litigants the right to have court cases transferred from the civil courts to the bishops. This situation must have hardly survived Julian, 361–363. Episcopal courts are not heard of again in the East until 398 and in the West in 408. The quality of these courts were low, ...
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Secondary School
A secondary school describes an institution that provides secondary education and also usually includes the building where this takes place. Some secondary schools provide both lower secondary education (age 12 to 15) and upper secondary education (age 15 to 18) i.e. levels 2 and 3 of the ISCED scale, but these can also be provided in separate schools, as in the American middle and high school system. In the UK, elite public schools typically admit pupils between the ages of 13 and 18. UK state schools accommodate pupils between the ages of 11 to 18. Secondary schools follow on from primary schools and prepare for vocational or tertiary education. Attendance is usually compulsory for students until age 16. The organisations, buildings, and terminology are more or less unique in each country. Levels of education In the ISCED 2011 education scale levels 2 and 3 correspond to secondary education which are as follows: * Lower secondary education - First stage of secondary education ...
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