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Apartheid In Art And Literature
There is a wide range of ways in which people have represented apartheid in popular culture. During (1948–1994) and following the apartheid era in South Africa, apartheid has been referenced in many books, films, and other forms of art and literature. Films *''Goodbye Bafana'' (2007), about Nelson Mandela's censor, James Gregory. *''Invictus'' (2009), starring Matt Damon and Morgan Freeman and directed by Clint Eastwood. A film based on Nelson Mandela's role in the 1995 Rugby World Cup in South Africa. The story is based on the John Carlin book ''Playing the Enemy: Nelson Mandela and the Game That Changed a Nation''. *''Stander'' (2003), about the South African police officer-turned-bank-robber André Stander, during the 1970s and 1980s. *''Lethal Weapon 2'' (1989), starring Mel Gibson and Danny Glover, about two detectives investigating a South African diplomat who runs a drug smuggling ring. *''Cry Freedom'' (1987), about the activist Steven Biko and journalist Donald Woods *'' ...
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Apartheid
Apartheid (South African English: ; , segregation; lit. "aparthood") was a system of institutionalised racial segregation that existed in South Africa and South West Africa (now Namibia) from 1948 until the early 1990s. Apartheid was characterised by an authoritarian political culture based on ''baasskap'' (or white supremacy), which ensured that South Africa was dominated politically, socially, and economically by the nation's minority white population. According to this system of social stratification, white citizens had the highest status, followed by Asians and Coloureds, then black Africans. The economic legacy and social effects of apartheid continue to the present day. Broadly speaking, apartheid was delineated into ''petty apartheid'', which entailed the segregation of public facilities and social events, and ''grand apartheid'', which dictated housing and employment opportunities by race. Prior to the 1940s, some aspects of apartheid had already emerged in ...
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Donald Woods
Donald James Woods, CBE (15 December 1933 – 19 August 2001), was a South African journalist and anti-apartheid activist. As editor of the ''Daily Dispatch'', he was known for befriending fellow activist Steve Biko, who was killed by the police after being detained by the South African government. Woods continued his campaign against apartheid in London, and in 1978 became the first private citizen to address the United Nations Security Council. Early life Woods was born at Hobeni, Transkei, where his family had lived for five generations. His ancestors arrived in South Africa with the 1820 Settlers. His parents ran a trading post in Transkei, a tribal reserve, which the South African government would later designate a bantustan. As a boy Woods had extensive regular contact with the Bomvana people. He spoke fluent Xhosa and Afrikaans, as well as his mother tongue, English. Woods and his brother, Harland, were sent to the Christian Brothers College in Kimberley in the predomina ...
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Shawn Slovo
Shawn Slovo (born 1950) is a screenwriter, best known for the film ''A World Apart'', based on her childhood in South Africa under apartheid. She is the daughter of South African Communist Party leaders Joe Slovo and Ruth First. She wrote the screenplay for the 2006 film ''Catch a Fire'' (also a historical film about apartheid), and for the 2001 film ''Captain Corelli's Mandolin''. In the late 1970s she served as Robert De Niro's personal assistant while he made the films ''Raging Bull'' and ''The King of Comedy''. She also wrote the screenplay for ''Muhammad Ali's Greatest Fight''. Slovo lives in London and often works for Working Title Films. Her sister Gillian Slovo is also a writer and her sister Robyn Slovo is a producer. Slovo's family is Jewish.https://www.jewishtampa.com/jews-in-the-news/jews-in-the-newssarah-michelle-gellar-julianne-margulies-and-jake-gyllenhaal References External links * Category:1950 births Category:Living people Category:Slovo family Category: ...
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A World Apart (film)
''A World Apart'' is a 1988 anti-apartheid drama film and directed by Chris Menges and starring Barbara Hershey, David Suchet, Jeroen Krabbé, Paul Freeman, Tim Roth, and Jodhi May. Written by Shawn Slovo, it is based on the lives of Slovo's parents, Ruth First and Joe Slovo. The film was a co-production between companies from the UK and Zimbabwe, where it was filmed. It features Hans Zimmer's first non-collaborative film score. Plot Set in Johannesburg in 1963, the film examines the abrupt ending of 13-year-old Molly's blithe childhood when her father, a member of the South African Communist Party, flees into exile. Ostracised by her peers, Molly draws closer to her mother who is part of the campaign against apartheid. Their relationship is challenged by hardship, political intimidation, and the mother's eventual arrest. The film title references both the gap between the mother and her teenage girl, who fails to grasp why their family is so fixated with events beyond their comf ...
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Peter Driscoll
Peter Driscoll (born October 27, 1954) is a Canadianformer professional ice hockey left wing who played in the World Hockey Association and National Hockey League between 1974 and 1981. He was born in Powassan, Ontario. Selected by the Toronto Maple Leafs in the 1974 NHL amateur draft and the Vancouver Blazers in the 1974 WHA Amateur Draft, Driscoll signed with the Blazers, moving to Calgary with them when they relocated. After the Calgary Cowboys folded, he signed as a free agent with the Quebec Nordiques and was later traded to the Indianapolis Racers. A year later, Driscoll was part of the deal that sent Wayne Gretzky to the Edmonton Oilers on November 2, 1978 with Eddie Mio.The Rebel League: The Short and Unruly Life of the World Hockey Association, p.219, McLelland and Stewart, Toronto, ON, Moving to the NHL with the Oilers, he did not see much action and split time between Edmonton and their CHL affiliates, Houston Apollos and Wichita Wind. Career statistics Regular sea ...
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Ralph Nelson
Ralph Nelson (August 12, 1916 – December 21, 1987) was an American film and television director, producer, writer, and actor. He was best known for directing ''Lilies of the Field'' (1963), ''Father Goose'' (1964), and ''Charly'' (1968), films which won Academy Awards. Life and career Nelson was born in Long Island City, New York. He served in the Army Air Corps as a flight instructor in World War II. Before the war ended, he had a play on Broadway: "The Wind Is Ninety" ran from June to September 1945. Kirk Douglas was in the cast. Nelson directed the acclaimed episode "A World of His Own" of ''The Twilight Zone'' (he should ''not'' be confused with ''The Twilight Zone's'' production manager, Ralph ''W.'' Nelson). He also directed both the television and film versions of Rod Serling's ''Requiem for a Heavyweight.'' He directed ''Charly,'' the 1968 film version of ''Flowers for Algernon,'' for which Cliff Robertson won an Academy Award, as well as several racially provoca ...
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The Wilby Conspiracy
''The Wilby Conspiracy'' is a 1975 DeLuxe Color thriller film directed by Ralph Nelson and starring Michael Caine, Sidney Poitier, and Nicol Williamson. Filmed in Kenya, it was written by Rodney Amateau, based on the 1972 novel by Peter Driscoll. It had a limited release in the US. Plot In apartheid-era South Africa, Shack Twala (played by Sidney Poitier), a black revolutionary who had served time on Robben Island, is freed by Rina van Niekerk (Prunella Gee), his Afrikaner defence attorney, because he would be a victim of retroactive legislation. Rina, estranged from her husband Blane (Rutger Hauer), is having a relationship with an English mining engineer, Jim Keogh (Michael Caine), who has attended Shack's trial. Surprised by the verdict, Rina, Jim and Shack go off to celebrate at her house. They are stopped by policemen who are conducting identity document checks and arresting everyone who does not have their papers on them. As Shack has only just been released from prison he w ...
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André Brink
André Philippus Brink, (29 May 1935 – 6 February 2015) was a South African novelist, essayist and poet. He wrote in both Afrikaans and English and taught English at the University of Cape Town. In the 1960s Brink, Ingrid Jonker, Etienne Leroux and Breyten Breytenbach were key figures in the significant Afrikaans literary movement known as ''Die Sestigers'' ("The Sixty-ers"). These writers sought to use Afrikaans as a language to speak against the apartheid government, and also to bring into Afrikaans literature the influence of contemporary English and French trends. While Brink's early novels were especially concerned with apartheid, his later work engaged the new range of issues posed by life in a democratic South Africa. Biography Brink was born in Vrede, in the Free State. Brink moved to Lydenburg, where he matriculated at Hoërskool Lydenburg in 1952 with seven distinctions, the second student from the then Transvaal to achieve this feat and studied Afrikaans literature ...
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A Dry White Season
''A Dry White Season'' is a 1989 American drama film directed by Euzhan Palcy and starring Donald Sutherland, Jürgen Prochnow, Marlon Brando, Janet Suzman, Zakes Mokae and Susan Sarandon. It was written by Colin Welland and Palcy, based upon André Brink's novel ''A Dry White Season''. Robert Bolt also contributed uncredited revisions of the screenplay. It is set in South Africa in 1976 and deals with the subject of apartheid. Brando was nominated for the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor. Plot In 1976, in South Africa during apartheid, Ben Du Toit (Donald Sutherland) is a South African school teacher at a school for whites only. One day, the son of his gardener, Gordon Ngubene (Winston Ntshona), gets beaten by the white police after he gets caught by the police during a peaceful demonstration for a better education policy for black people in South Africa. Gordon asks Ben for help. After Ben refuses to help because of his trust in the police, Gordon gets caught by the police as we ...
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Alan Paton
Alan Stewart Paton (11 January 1903 – 12 April 1988) was a South African author and anti-apartheid activist. His works include the novels ''Cry, the Beloved Country'' and ''Too Late the Phalarope''. Family Paton was born in Pietermaritzburg in the Colony of Natal (now South Africa's KwaZulu-Natal province), the son of a civil servant. After attending Maritzburg College, he earned a Bachelor of Science degree at the University of Natal in his hometown, followed by a diploma in education. After graduation, Paton worked as an teacher, first at the Ixopo High School, and subsequently at Maritzburg College While at Ixopo he met Dorrie Francis Lusted. They were married in 1928 and remained together until her death from emphysema in 1967. Their life together is documented in Paton's book ''Kontakion for You Departed,'' published in 1969. They had two sons, Jonathan and David. In 1969, Paton married Anne Hopkins. This marriage lasted until Paton's death. Early career He served as th ...
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Cry, The Beloved Country (1951 Film)
''Cry, the Beloved Country'' is a 1951 British drama film directed by Zoltán Korda. Based on the novel of the same name by Alan Paton, it stars Canada Lee, Sidney Poitier, and Charles Carson. This film was Canada Lee's last film. Although not a solely black cast the film is a rarity for its date in that all the main characters are black, and the white roles are as supporting actors. However, the contemporary film posters chose to illustrate only the white supporting actors. Plot From the back country of South Africa, black minister Stephen Kumalo (Canada Lee) journeys to Johannesburg to help his sister, who has been reported to be ill, and to search for his son, who left home and has not kept in contact. He is also asked to visit the daughter of someone who has not heard from her for some time. With the help of fellow minister, Reverend Msimangu (Sidney Poitier), he discovers that his sister, who has a young son, who left home to find her husband who left in search of work, fai ...
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Soweto Riots
The Soweto uprising was a series of demonstrations and protests led by black school children in South Africa that began on the morning of 16 June 1976. Students from numerous Sowetan schools began to protest in the streets of Soweto in response to the introduction of Afrikaans as the medium of instruction in local schools. It is estimated that 20,000 students took part in the protests. They were met with fierce police brutality and many were shot and killed. The number of people killed in the uprising is usually given as 176, but estimates of up to 700 have been made. In remembrance of these events, 16 June is now a public holiday in South Africa, named Youth Day. Causes of the protests Black South African high school students in Soweto protested against the ''Afrikaans Medium Decree'' of 1974, which forced all black schools to use Afrikaans and English in a 50–50 mix as languages of instruction. The Regional Director of Bantu Education (Northern Transvaal Region), J.G. Erasmu ...
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Sarafina! (musical)
''Sarafina!'' is a South African musical by Mbongeni Ngema depicting students involved in the Soweto Riots, in opposition to apartheid. It was also adapted into a 1992 film starring Whoopi Goldberg and Leleti Khumalo. ''Sarafina!'' premiered on Broadway on 28 January 1988, at the Cort Theatre, and closed on 2 July 1989, after 597 performances and 11 previews. The musical was conceived and directed by Mbongeni Ngema, who also wrote the book, music, and lyrics. The play was first presented at The Market Theatre, Johannesburg, South Africa, in June 1987. The cast included Leleti Khumalo as Sarafina. Leleti Khumalo received a Tony Award nomination, Best Featured Actress in a Musical, as well as a NAACP Image Award for her Broadway theatre portrayal of the title character. The production was also nominated for the Tony Award for: Best Musical, Best Original Score, Best Choreography, and Best Direction of a Musical. The show presents a school uprising similar to the Soweto uprising ...
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Bryce Courtenay
Arthur Bryce Courtenay, (14 August 1933 – 22 November 2012) was a South African-Australian advertising director and novelist. He is one of Australia's best-selling authors, notable for his book ''The Power of One''. Background and early years Arthur Bryce Courtenay was born in the Lebombo Mountains, South Africa, the son of Maude Greer and Arthur Ryder. Ryder was married with six children, and lived with his family, but also maintained a relationship with Greer, with whom he already had a daughter, Rosemary. Maude Greer gave the surname Courtenay to both her children. Bryce Courtenay spent most of his early years in a small village in the Lebombo Mountains in the Limpopo province. He later attended King Edward VII School in Johannesburg. In 1955, while studying journalism in London, Courtenay met Benita Solomon. They emigrated to Sydney in 1958, married in 1959 and had three sons – Brett, Adam and Damon. Courtenay entered the advertising industry and, over a career spa ...
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The Power Of One (film)
''The Power of One'' is a 1992 drama film loosely based on Bryce Courtenay's 1989 novel of the same name. Set in South Africa during World War II, the film centers on the life of Peter Philip Kenneth-Keith, an English South African boy raised under apartheid, and his conflicted relationships with a German pianist, a Coloured boxing coach and an Afrikaner romantic interest. Directed and edited by John G. Avildsen, the film stars Stephen Dorff, John Gielgud, Morgan Freeman, Armin Mueller-Stahl, and Daniel Craig in his feature film debut. Plot Born in 1930 to a recently widowed Englishwoman on a homestead in South Africa, little Peter Philip is schooled in the ways of England by his mother and the ways of Africa by a Zulu nanny, whose son Tonderai is also his best friend. Their easy life is forever shattered, however, when the farm's cattle are claimed by ''rinderpest''. PK's mother succumbs to a nervous breakdown, and he is sent away to a conservative Afrikaans boarding school while s ...
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