HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Senegalia
202; see text.The range of the genus Senegalia.SynonymsAcacia subgen. Aculeiferum Vassal sect. Aculeiferum Pedley Austroacacia Mill. Dugandia Britton & Killip 1936 Manganaroa Speg. 1921 Senegalia
Senegalia
(from Senegal
Senegal
and Acacia senegal
Acacia senegal
(L.) Willd.)[1] is a genus of flowering plants in the legume family, Fabaceae. It belongs to the subfamily Mimosoideae
[...More...]

"Senegalia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Legume
A legume (/ˈlɛɡjuːm/ or /ˌləˈɡjuːm/) is a plant or its fruit or seed in the family Fabaceae
Fabaceae
(or Leguminosae). Legumes are grown agriculturally, primarily for their grain seed called pulse, for livestock forage and silage, and as soil-enhancing green manure. Well-known legumes include alfalfa, clover, peas, beans, chickpeas, lentils, lupin bean, mesquite, carob, soybeans, peanuts and tamarind. Fabaceae
Fabaceae
is the most common family found in tropical rainforests and in dry forests in the Americas
Americas
and Africa.[1] A legume fruit is a simple dry fruit that develops from a simple carpel and usually dehisces (opens along a seam) on two sides
[...More...]

"Legume" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Caesalpinioideae
See textSynonymsCassioideae Burmeist. 1837 GCM Clade Marazzi et al. 2012[1] MCC Clade Doyle 2011[2][3] Mimosoideae
Mimosoideae
DC. 1825 Chamaecrista
Chamaecrista
absus Caesalpinioideae
Caesalpinioideae
is a botanical name at the rank of subfamily, placed in the large family Fabaceae
Fabaceae
or Leguminosae. Its name is formed from the generic name Caesalpinia. It is known also as the peacock flower subfamily.[4] The Caesalpinioideae
Caesalpinioideae
are mainly trees distributed in the moist tropics, but include such temperate species as the honeylocust ( Gleditsia
Gleditsia
triacanthos) and Kentucky coffeetree ( Gymnocladus
Gymnocladus
dioicus). It has the following clade-based definition:The most inclusive crown clade containing Arcoa gonavensis Urb
[...More...]

"Caesalpinioideae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Polyphyly
A polyphyletic group is a set of organisms, or other evolving elements, that have been grouped together but do not share an immediate common ancestor. The term is often applied to groups that share characteristics that appear to be similar but have not been inherited from common ancestors; these characteristics are known as homoplasies, and the development and phenomenon of homoplasies is known as convergent evolution. The arrangement of the members of a polyphyletic group is called a polyphyly. Alternatively, polyphyletic is simply used to describe a group whose members come from multiple ancestral sources, regardless of similarity of characteristics
[...More...]

"Polyphyly" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Taxonomy (biology)
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
[...More...]

"Taxonomy (biology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Synonym (taxonomy)
In scientific nomenclature, a synonym is a scientific name that applies to a taxon that (now) goes by a different scientific name,[1] although the term is used somewhat differently in the zoological code of nomenclature.[2] For example, Linnaeus was the first to give a scientific name (under the currently used system of scientific nomenclature) to the Norway spruce, which he called Pinus abies. This name is no longer in use: it is now a synonym of the current scientific name which is Picea abies. Unlike synonyms in other contexts, in taxonomy a synonym is not interchangeable with the name of which it is a synonym. In taxonomy, synonyms are not equals, but have a different status. For any taxon with a particular circumscription, position, and rank, only one scientific name is considered to be the correct one at any given time (this correct name is to be determined by applying the relevant code of nomenclature)
[...More...]

"Synonym (taxonomy)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Stipule
In botany, stipule ( Latin
Latin
stipula: straw, stalk) is a term coined by Linnaeus[1] which refers to outgrowths borne on either side (sometimes just one side) of the base of a leafstalk (the petiole). A pair of stipules is considered part of the anatomy of the leaf of a typical flowering plant, although in many species the stipules are inconspicuous or entirely absent (and the leaf is then termed exstipulate)
[...More...]

"Stipule" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Type Species
In zoological nomenclature, a type species (species typica) is the species name with which the name of a genus or subgenus is considered to be permanently taxonomically associated, i.e., the species that contains the biological type specimen(s).[1] A similar concept is used for suprageneric groups called a type genus. In botanical nomenclature, these terms have no formal standing under the code of nomenclature, but are sometimes borrowed from zoological nomenclature. In botany, the type of a genus name is a specimen (or, rarely, an illustration) which is also the type of a species name. The species name that has that type can also be referred to as the type of the genus name
[...More...]

"Type Species" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fabaceae
The Fabaceae
Fabaceae
or Leguminosae,[6] commonly known as the legume, pea, or bean family, is a large and economically important family of flowering plants. It includes trees, shrubs, and perennial or annual herbaceous plants, which are easily recognized by their fruit (legume) and their compound, stipulated leaves. Many legumes have characteristics of flowers and fruits
[...More...]

"Fabaceae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fabales
The Fabales
Fabales
are an order of flowering plants included in the rosid group of the eudicots in the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group II classification system. In the APG II circumscription, this order includes the families Fabaceae
Fabaceae
or legumes (including the subfamilies Caesalpinioideae, Mimosoideae, and Faboideae), Quillajaceae, Polygalaceae
Polygalaceae
or milkworts (including the families Diclidantheraceae, Moutabeaceae, and Xanthophyllaceae), and Surianaceae. Under the Cronquist system
Cronquist system
and some other plant classification systems, the order Fabales
Fabales
contains only the family Fabaceae. In the classification system of Dahlgren the Fabales
Fabales
were in the superorder Fabiflorae (also called Fabanae) with three familiese corresponding to the subfamilies of Fabaceae
Fabaceae
in APG II
[...More...]

"Fabales" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rosids
The rosids are members of a large clade (monophyletic group) of flowering plants, containing about 70,000 species,[2] more than a quarter of all angiosperms.[3] The clade is divided into 16 to 20 orders, depending upon circumscription and classification. These orders, in turn, together comprise about 140 families.[4] Fossil rosids are known from the Cretaceous
Cretaceous
period. Molecular clock estimates indicate that the rosids originated in the Aptian
Aptian
or Albian stages of the Cretaceous, between 125 and 99.6 million years ago.[5][6]Contents1 Name 2 Relationships 3 Classification3.1 Orders4 Phylogeny 5 References 6 External linksName[edit] The name is based upon the name "Rosidae", which had usually been understood to be a subclass
[...More...]

"Rosids" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Eudicots
The eudicots, Eudicotidae or eudicotyledons are a clade of flowering plants that had been called tricolpates or non-magnoliid dicots by previous authors. The botanical terms were introduced in 1991 by evolutionary botanist James A. Doyle and paleobotanist Carol L. Hotton to emphasize the later evolutionary divergence of tricolpate dicots from earlier, less specialized, dicots.[1] The close relationships among flowering plants with tricolpate pollen grains was initially seen in morphological studies of shared derived characters. These plants have a distinct trait in their pollen grains of exhibiting three colpi or grooves paralleling the polar axis. Later molecular evidence confirmed the genetic basis for the evolutionary relationships among flowering plants with tricolpate pollen grains and dicotyledonous traits. The term means "true dicotyledons", as it contains the majority of plants that have been considered dicots and have characteristics of the dicots
[...More...]

"Eudicots" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Flowering Plant
sweet bayScientific classificationKingdom: PlantaeSubkingdom: Embryophyta(unranked): Spermatophyta(unranked): AngiospermsGroups (APG IV)[1]Basal angiospermsAmborellales Nymphaeales AustrobaileyalesCore angiospermsmagnoliids Chloranthales monocots Ceratophyllales eudicotsSynonyms Anthophyta Cronquist[2] Angiospermae Lindl. Magnoliophyta Cronquist, Takht.
Takht.
& W.Zimm.[3] Magnolicae Takht.[4]The flowering plants, also known as angiosperms, Angiospermae[5][6] or Magnoliophyta,[7] are the most diverse group of land plants, with 416 families, approximately 13,164 known genera and c. 295,383 known species.[8] Like gymnosperms, angiosperms are seed-producing plants. However, they are distinguished from gymnosperms by characteristics including flowers, endosperm within the seeds, and the production of fruits that contain the seeds
[...More...]

"Flowering Plant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Plant
Plants are mainly multicellular, predominantly photosynthetic eukaryotes of the kingdom Plantae. They form the clade Viridiplantae (Latin for "green plants") that includes the flowering plants, conifers and other gymnosperms, ferns, clubmosses, hornworts, liverworts, mosses and the green algae, and excludes the red and brown algae. Historically, plants were treated as one of two kingdoms including all living things that were not animals, and all algae and fungi were treated as plants. However, all current definitions of Plantae exclude the fungi and some algae, as well as the prokaryotes (the archaea and bacteria). Green plants have cell walls containing cellulose and obtain most of their energy from sunlight via photosynthesis by primary chloroplasts that are derived from endosymbiosis with cyanobacteria. Their chloroplasts contain chlorophylls a and b, which gives them their green color
[...More...]

"Plant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Inflorescence
An inflorescence is a group or cluster of flowers arranged on a stem that is composed of a main branch or a complicated arrangement of branches. Morphologically, it is the modified part of the shoot of seed plants where flowers are formed. The modifications can involve the length and the nature of the internodes and the phyllotaxis, as well as variations in the proportions, compressions, swellings, adnations, connations and reduction of main and secondary axes. Inflorescence
Inflorescence
can also be defined as the reproductive portion of a plant that bears a cluster of flowers in a specific pattern. The stem holding the whole inflorescence is called a peduncle and the major axis (incorrectly referred to as the main stem) holding the flowers or more branches within the inflorescence is called the rachis. The stalk of each single flower is called a pedicel
[...More...]

"Inflorescence" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Senegal
Coordinates: 14°N 14°W / 14°N 14°W / 14; -14 Republic
Republic
of Senegal République du Sénégal  (French)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Un Peuple, Un But, Une Foi" (French) "One People, One Goal, One Faith"Anthem:  Pincez Tous vos Koras, Frappez les Balafons Everyone strum your koras, strike the balafonsLocation of  Senegal  (dark blue) in the African Union  (light blue)Capital and largest city Dakar 14°40′N 17°25′W / 14.667°N 17.417°W / 14.667; -17.417Official language
[...More...]

"Senegal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.