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Great Dividing Range
The Great Dividing Range, or the Eastern Highlands, is Australia's most substantial mountain range and the third longest land-based range in the world. It stretches more than 3,500 kilometres (2,175 mi) from Dauan Island off the northeastern tip of Queensland, running the entire length of the eastern coastline through New South Wales, then into Victoria and turning west, before finally fading into the central plain at the Grampians in western Victoria
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Paul Edmund Strzelecki
Sir Paweł Edmund Strzelecki KCMG CB FRS FRGS (Polish pronunciation: [ˈpavɛw ˈɛdmunt stʂɛˈlɛt͡skʲi]; 20 July 1797 – 6 October 1873), also known as Paul Edmund de Strzelecki, was a Prussian[1] (of Polish ethnicity)[2][3] explorer and geologist[4] who in 1845 also became a British subject.Contents1 Early years 2 Australia 3 Europe 4 Awards and honours 5 Eponyms 6 Writing 7 References 8 External linksEarly years[edit] Strzelecki was born in 1797, in Glausche, Lower Silesia, Kingdom of Prussia (today the town is called Głuszyna, part of Nowe Miasto, Poznań, Poland), the third child of Franciszek Strzelecki, a Polish nobleman (szlachcic) leasing land, and his wife, Anna Raczyńska.[5] In Australia, Strzelecki was called a Count, though there is no proof that he actually approved or used such a title himself. Strzelecki served shortly in the Prussian army in the 6th Regiment of Thuringischen Uhlans, at the time known as Polish Regiment because so
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Aboriginal Australians
Aboriginal Australians
Australians
are legally defined as people who are members "of the Aboriginal race of Australia" (indigenous to mainland Australia or to the island of Tasmania).[3][4][5][6]Contents1 Legal and administrative definitions1.1 Definitions from Aboriginal Australians 1.2 Definitions from academia2 Origins 3 Health3.1 Tobacc
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Ludwig Leichhardt
Friedrich Wilhelm Ludwig Leichhardt
Ludwig Leichhardt
(German pronunciation: [ˈfʁiːdʁɪç 'vɪlhɛlm 'lu:tvɪç 'laɪçhaːʁt]), known as Ludwig Leichhardt, (23 October 1813 – c
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Drainage Basin
A drainage basin is any area of land where precipitation collects and drains off into a common outlet, such as into a river, bay, or other body of water
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Bass Strait
Bass Strait
Strait
/bæs/ is a sea strait separating Tasmania
Tasmania
from the Australian mainland, specifically the state of Victoria.Contents1 Extent1.1 Differing views of location and context2 Discovery and exploration by Europeans 3 Geography 4 Maritime history 5 Islands 6 Protected areas6.1 Federal 6.2 State7 Natural resources 8 Infrastructure8.1 Transport8.1.1 Ferries8.2 Energy 8.3 Communications9 Popular culture 10 Non-motorised crossings 11 See also 12 References 13 External links 14 Further readingExtent[edit] The International Hydrographic Organization
International Hydrographic Organization
defines the limits of Bass Strait
Strait
as follows:[1]On the west
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Darling Downs
Darling is a term of endearment of Anglo-Saxon origin. Darling or Darlin' or Darlings may also refer to:Contents1 People 2 Places2.1 In Australia 2.2 In the United States 2.3 In Nepal 2.4 Elsewhere3 Films and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Other uses 6 See alsoPeople[edit] Darling (surname)Places[edit] In Australia[edit]
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Carboniferous
The Carboniferous
Carboniferous
is a geologic period and system that spans 60 million years from the end of the Devonian
Devonian
Period 358.9 million years ago (Mya), to the beginning of the Permian
Permian
Period, 298.9 Mya
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Geology Of Australia
Australia
Australia
is a continent situated on the Indo-Australian Plate. The geology of Australia
Australia
includes virtually all known rock types and from all geological time periods spanning over 3.8 billion years of the Earth's history.


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Thomas Mitchell (explorer)
Lieutenant Colonel Sir Thomas Livingstone Mitchell (15 June 1792 – 5 October 1855), surveyor and explorer of south-eastern Australia, was born at Grangemouth in Stirlingshire, Scotland.[1] In 1827 he took up an appointment as Assistant Surveyor General of New South Wales. The following year he became Surveyor General and remained in this position until his death
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Schist
Schist
Schist
(pronounced /ʃɪst/ SHIST) is a medium-grade metamorphic rock[1] with medium to large, flat, sheet-like grains in a preferred orientation (nearby grains are roughly parallel). It is defined by having more than 50% platy and elongated minerals,[2] often finely interleaved with quartz and feldspar.[3] These lamellar (flat, planar) minerals include micas, chlorite, talc, hornblende, graphite, and others. Quartz
Quartz
often occurs in drawn-out grains to such an extent that a particular form called quartz schist is produced. Schist
Schist
is often garnetiferous. Schist
Schist
forms at a higher temperature and has larger grains than phyllite.[4] Geological foliation (metamorphic arrangement in layers) with medium to large grained flakes in a preferred sheetlike orientation is called schistosity.[4] The names of various schists are derived from their mineral constituents
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1813 Crossing Of The Blue Mountains
The 1813 crossing of the Blue Mountains was the expedition led by Gregory Blaxland, William Lawson and William Charles Wentworth, which became the first successful crossing of the Blue Mountains in New South Wales by European settlers.[2] The crossing enabled the settlers to access and use the land west of the mountains for farming, and made possible the establishment of Australia's first inland settlement at Bathurst.[3]Contents1 Background 2 The crossing 3 Journals 4 Afterwards 5 Commemorations 6 Locations 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksBackground[edit] The European settlement at Sydney Cove, established in 1788 after the arrival of the First Fleet, grew rapidly.[4] By the early 19th century, the Blue Mountains had become a barrier to the expansion of the colony, which required more farming land to meet its needs, particularly after the droughts of 1812 and 1813.[4][5][6] The local Indigenous people knew at least two routes by which to cross the mountain
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William Lawson (explorer)
William Lawson, MLC (2 June 1774 – 16 June 1850) was an English born explorer, land owner, grazier and politician who migrated to Sydney, New South Wales
New South Wales
in 1800. With Gregory Blaxland
Gregory Blaxland
and William Wentworth, he participated in the first successful crossing of the Blue Mountains by European settlers.Contents1 Early life and migration to Australia 2 Crossing the Blue Mountains 3 Later life 4 References4.1 Additional resources listed by the Australian Dictionary of Biography5 External linksEarly life and migration to Australia[edit] Lawson was born in Finchley, Middlesex, England son of Scottish parents who had lived at Kirkpatrick. He trained as a surveyor but later bought a commission in the New South Wales
New South Wales
Corps and migrated to Sydney, arriving in November 1800.[1] Shortly after his arrival he was posted to work at the military station at Norfolk Island
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William Wentworth
William Charles Wentworth (13 August 1790 – 20 March 1872)[1] was an Australian explorer, journalist, politician and author, and one of the leading figures of early colonial New South Wales. He was the first native-born Australian to achieve a reputation overseas, and a leading advocate for self-government for the Australian colonies.Contents1 Birth 2 Early life 3 Crossing the Blue Mountains 4 Studying in England 5 Political life 6 Family 7 Recognition 8 Works 9 Sources 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksBirth[edit] William Wentworth
William Wentworth
was born in August 17 1790 to D'Arcy Wentworth and Catherine Crowley. D'Arcy was the impecunious distant offspring of the aristocratic Wentworth family. D'Arcy was born in Ireland in 1762, but had left to train as a surgeon in London. To maintain his lifestyle he apparently became a highwayman but soon found himself in trouble with the law
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Blaxland, New South Wales
Blaxland is a town in the Blue Mountains of New South Wales, Australia. Blaxland is located 70 kilometres west of Sydney
Sydney
in the local government area of the City of Blue Mountains. It is at an altitude of 234 metres and borders the townships/suburbs of Glenbrook, Mount Riverview and Warrimoo.Contents1 History 2 Transport 3 Commercial area 4 Services 5 Schools 6 Sport and recreation 7 Gallery 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] Blaxland is named for Gregory Blaxland
Gregory Blaxland
who along with William Lawson and William Wentworth, led the exploration that discovered a route over the Blue Mountains in 1813. Prior to 1879 the area was known as Wascoe. The Pilgrim Inn was built c. 1825. It was a significant element in the area for some time, but eventually decayed. The remains, which are now adjacent to McDonald's, are heritage-listed.[2] The Rev. Joshua Hargrave became a major presence in the area in the early 20th
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Newcastle, New South Wales
The Newcastle (/ˈnjuːkɑːsəl/) metropolitan area is the second most populated area in the Australian state of New South Wales
New South Wales
and includes most of the Newcastle and Lake Macquarie local government areas.[3] It is the hub of the Greater Newcastle area which includes most parts of the local government areas of City of Newcastle, City of Lake Macquarie, City of Cessnock, City of Maitland
City of Maitland
and Port Stephens Council.[4][5] Located 162 kilometres (101 mi) north-northeast of Sydney, at the mouth of the Hunter River, it is the predominant city within the Hunter Region. Famous for its coal, Newcastle is the largest coal exporting harbour in the world, exporting 159.9 million tonnes of coal in 2017.[6] Beyond the city, the Hunter Region
Hunter Region
possesses large coal deposits
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