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WAP 4
WAP - 4 is the mainstay passenger electric locomotive used in India. The locomotive was developed after a previous class WAP-1 was found inadequate to haul the longer, heavier express trains (24-26 coaches) that were becoming the mainstay of the Indian Railways
Indian Railways
network
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Chittaranjan Locomotive Works
Chittaranjan
Chittaranjan
Locomotive Works is a state-owned electric locomotive manufacturer based in India. It is located at Chittaranjan
Chittaranjan
in Asansol. It is one of the largest locomotive manufacturers in the world.WAP5 made at CLW, ChittaranjanContents1 Overview 2 History 3 Products3.1 Locomotives 3.2 Traction Motors4 See also 5 External links 6 ReferencesOverview[edit] Founded in 1950, the Indian Railway
Indian Railway
owned industrial unit is named after the Indian freedom-fighter Chittaranjan
Chittaranjan
Das
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Hitachi
Hitachi, Ltd. (株式会社日立製作所, Kabushiki-gaisha Hitachi Seisakusho) (Japanese pronunciation: [çiꜜtatɕi]) is a Japanese multinational conglomerate company headquartered in Chiyoda, Tokyo, Japan. It is the parent company of the Hitachi
Hitachi
Group (Hitachi Gurūpu) and forms part of the DKB Group of companies
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Diesel Locomotive
A diesel locomotive is a type of railway locomotive in which the prime mover is a diesel engine. Several types of diesel locomotive have been developed, differing mainly in the means by which mechanical power is conveyed to the driving wheels (drivers). Early internal combustion engine-powered locomotives and railcars used kerosene and gasoline as their fuel. Soon after Dr. Rudolf Diesel patented his first compression ignition engine[1] in 1898, it was considered for railway propulsion. Progress was slow, however, as several problems had to be overcome. Power transmission was a primary concern. As opposed to steam and electric engines, internal combustion engines work efficiently only within a limited range of turning frequencies. In light vehicles, this could be overcome by a clutch. In heavy railway vehicles, mechanical transmission never worked well or wore out too soon
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Steam Locomotive
A steam locomotive is a type of railway locomotive that produces its pulling power through a steam engine. These locomotives are fueled by burning combustible material – usually coal, wood, or oil – to produce steam in a boiler. The steam moves reciprocating pistons which are mechanically connected to the locomotive's main wheels (drivers). Both fuel and water supplies are carried with the locomotive, either on the locomotive itself or in wagons (tenders) pulled behind. Steam locomotives were first developed in Great Britain during the early 19th century and used for railway transport until the middle of the 20th century. The first steam locomotive, made by Richard Trevithick, first operated on 21 February 1804, three years after the road locomotive he made in 1801
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Indian Gauge
North America · South America · Europe · Australiav t e5 ft 6 in/​1,676 mm is the size of a broad track gauge commonly used in India, Pakistan, west of Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Argentina, Chile, and on the BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit) in the San Francisco Bay Area. In the Indian Subcontinent
Indian Subcontinent
it is simply known as "Broad gauge", while in North America, it is called Provincial, Portland, or Texas gauge. Elsewhere it is known as "Indian gauge"
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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West Bengal
West Bengal
Bengal
(/wɛst bɛŋˈɡɔːl/) is an Indian state, located in Eastern India
India
on the Bay of Bengal. With over 91 million inhabitants (as of 2011), it is India's fourth-most populous state. It has an area of 88,752 km2 (34,267 sq mi). A part of the ethno-linguistic Bengal
Bengal
region, it borders Bangladesh
Bangladesh
in the east, and Nepal
Nepal
and Bhutan
Bhutan
in the north. It also borders the Indian states of Odisha, Jharkhand, Bihar, Sikkim, and Assam. The state capital is Kolkata
Kolkata
(Calcutta), the seventh-largest city in India. As for geography, West Bengal
Bengal
includes the Darjeeling
Darjeeling
Himalayan hill region, the Ganges
Ganges
delta, the Rarh region, and the coastal Sundarbans
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Rail Transport In India
Rail transport is an important mode of transport in India. All main-line rail operations in India
India
are handled by Indian Railways (IR), a state-owned organization of the Ministry of Railways
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History Of Rail Transport In India
Rail transport in India
Rail transport in India
began during the early nineteenth century.Contents1 1832–1852: Industrial railways 2 1853–1924: Passenger railways and expansion 3 1925–1950: Electrification and further expansion 4 1951–1983: Zonal re-organisation and further developments 5 1984–Present: Rapid Transit and Later Developments 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External links1832–1852: Industrial railways[edit] India's first railway proposals were made in Madras
Madras
in 1832.[1] The Red Hill Railway, the country's first train, ran from Red Hills to Chintadripet
Chintadripet
bridge in Madras
Madras
in 1837. It was hauled by a rotary steam-engine locomotive manufactured by William Avery
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Electric Locomotive
An electric locomotive is a locomotive powered by electricity from overhead lines, a third rail or on-board energy storage such as a battery or a supercapacitor. Electric locomotives with on-board fueled prime movers, such as diesel engines or gas turbines, are classed as diesel-electric or gas turbine-electric and not as electric locomotives, because the electric generator/motor combination serves only as a power transmission system. Electric locomotives benefit from the high efficiency of electric motors, often above 90% (not including the inefficiency of generating the electricity). Additional efficiency can be gained from regenerative braking, which allows kinetic energy to be recovered during braking to put power back on the line. Newer electric locomotives use AC motor-inverter drive systems that provide for regenerative braking. Electric locomotives are quiet compared to diesel locomotives since there is no engine and exhaust noise and less mechanical noise
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Indian Railways
Indian Railways
Indian Railways
(IR) is India's national railway system operated by the Ministry of Railways. It manages the fourth-largest railway network in the world by size, with 121,407 kilometres (75,439 mi) of total track over a 67,368-kilometre (41,861 mi) route.[3] Forty nine percent of the routes are electrified with 25 KV AC electric traction while thirty three percent of them are double or multi-tracked.[3][4] IR runs more than 13,000 passenger trains daily, on both long-distance and suburban routes, from 7,349 stations across India.[3] The trains have a five-digit numbering system. Mail or express trains, the most common types, run at an average speed of 50.6 kilometres per hour (31.4 mph).[5] In the freight segment, IR runs more than 9,200 trains daily
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Tractive Force
As used in mechanical engineering, the term tractive force can either refer to the total traction a vehicle exerts on a surface, or the amount of the total traction that is parallel to the direction of motion.[1] In railway engineering, the term tractive effort is often used synonymously with tractive force to describe the pulling or pushing capability of a locomotive. In automotive engineering, the terms are distinctive: tractive effort is generally higher than tractive force by the amount of rolling resistance present, and both terms are higher than the amount of drawbar pull by the total resistance present (including air resistance and grade). The published tractive force value for any vehicle may be theoretical—that is, calculated from known or implied mechanical properties—or obtained via testing under controlled conditions
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Railway Air Brake
A railway air brake is a railway brake power braking system with compressed air as the operating medium.[1] Modern trains rely upon a fail-safe air brake system that is based upon a design patented by George Westinghouse
George Westinghouse
on March 5, 1868. The Westinghouse Air Brake Company was subsequently organized to manufacture and sell Westinghouse's invention. In various forms, it has been nearly universally adopted. The Westinghouse system uses air pressure to charge air reservoirs (tanks) on each car. Full air pressure signals each car to release the brakes
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Railway Brake
Brakes are used on the cars of railway trains to enable deceleration, control acceleration (downhill) or to keep them standing when parked. While the basic principle is familiar from road vehicle usage, operational features are more complex because of the need to control multiple linked carriages and to be effective on vehicles left without a prime mover
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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