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Tract Housing
Tract housing is a type of housing development in which multiple similar homes are built on a tract (area) of land that is subdivided into individual small lots. Tract housing developments are found in world suburb developments that were modeled on the "Levittown" concept and sometimes encompass large areas of dozens of square miles.[1][2] Tract housing evolved in the 1940s when the demand for cheap housing rocketed. Economies of scale meant that large numbers of identical homes could be built faster and more cheaply to fulfil the growing demand. Developers would purchase a dozen or more adjacent lots and conduct the building construction as an assembly-line process.[3] Tract housing development makes use of few architectural designs, and labor costs are reduced because workers need to learn the skills and movements of constructing only those designs rather than repeat the learning curve
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Row House
In architecture and city planning, a terrace or terraced house (UK) or townhouse (US)[a] is a form of medium-density housing that originated in Europe in the 16th century, whereby a row of attached dwellings share side walls. They are also known in some areas as row houses or row homes (especially in Baltimore, Chicago, New York City, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Boston, St. Louis, and Washington, D.C.). Terrace housing can be found throughout the world, though it is in abundance in Europe and Latin America, and extensive examples can be found in Australia and North America. The Place des Vosges in Paris (1605–1612) is one of the early examples of the style
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Subdivisions (song)

"Subdivisions" is a song by Canadian progressive rock group, Rush, released as the second single from their 1982 album Signals. "Subdivisions" is the municipal anthem of Toronto, Ontario. The song was a staple of the band's live performances, is played regularly on classic-rock radio, and appears on several greatest-hits compilations. It was released as a single in 1982, and despite limited success on the UK charts, the song had significant airplay in Great Britain.[citation needed] In the United States, it charted at No. 5 on the Billboard Bubbling Under Hot 100 chart and No. 5 on the Mainstream Rock Tracks chart.[1][2] Played live prior to its release, numerous pre-release live versions have circulated among collectors for years.

The song is a commentary on social stratification through the pressure to adopt certain lifestyles
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Pet Shop Boys

The quote was subsequently sampled in the song "Paninaro", and further established the band's early reputation of being anti-rock'n'roll and aligned with disco and dance music culture. The 1997 B-side "How I Learned to Hate Rock and Roll", and their 1991 songs "DJ Culture", "Can you forgive her?" and "How can you expect to be taken seriously?" continued this sentiment.[91] Lowe and Tennant have since refuted this claim by mentioning since the rise of House, Rave and Disco, they are not so against rock as stated in multiple interviews when asked about it. However, they are still known for openly criticising trends in the music business, such as casting shows in 2010[92] or a pop climate obsessed with authenticity ("authenticity is a style and it's always the same style") in 2020.country and western. I don't like rock music, I don't like rockabilly or rock and roll particularly
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