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Social Groups
In the social sciences, a social group has been defined as two or more people who interact with one another, share similar characteristics, and collectively have a sense of unity. Other theorists disagree however, and are wary of definitions which stress the importance of interdependence or objective similarity.[1][2] Instead, researchers within the social identity tradition generally define it as "a group is defined in terms of those who identify themselves as members of the group".[3] Regardless, social groups come in a myriad of sizes and varieties
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Corporate Group
A corporate group or group of companies is a collection of parent and subsidiary corporations that function as a single economic entity through a common source of control. The concept of a group is frequently used in tax law, accounting and (less frequently) company law to attribute the rights and duties of one member of the group to another or the whole. If the corporations are engaged in entirely different businesses, the group is called a conglomerate. The forming of corporate groups usually involves consolidation via mergers and acquisitions, although the group concept focuses on the instances in which the merged and acquired corporate entities remain in existence rather than the instances in which they are dissolved by the parent. The group may be owned by a holding company which may have no actual operations. In Germany, where a sophisticated law of the "concern" has been developed, the law of corporate groups is a fundamental aspect of its corporate law
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Sociology Of Law
The sociology of law (or legal sociology) is often described as a sub-discipline of sociology or an interdisciplinary approach within legal studies.[1] Some see sociology of law as belonging "necessarily" to the field of sociology[2] whilst others tend to consider it a field of research caught up between the disciplines of law and sociology.[3] Still others regard it neither as a sub-discipline of sociology nor as a branch of legal studies but as a field of research on its own right within the broader social science tradition
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Sociology Of Education
The sociology of education is the study of how public institutions and individual experiences affect education and its outcomes
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Economic Sociology
Economic sociology
Economic sociology
is the study of the social cause and effect of various economic phenomena. The field can be broadly divided into a classical period and a contemporary one, known as "New economic sociology". The classical period was concerned particularly with modernity and its constituent aspects which are rationalisation, secularisation, urbanisation, social stratification, and so on. As sociology arose primarily as a reaction to capitalist modernity, economics played a role in much classic sociological inquiry
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Environmental Sociology
Environmental sociology
Environmental sociology
is the study of interactions between societies and their natural environments
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Sociology Of The Family
Sociological studies of the family look at:demographic characteristics of the family members: family size, age, ethnicity, and gender of the members social class of the family, the economic level and mobility of the family, the professions of its members, the education levels of the family members what spheres of life are important in and to the family unit the effect of social change on the family the interactions of the family with other social organizations. diversity of family forms in contemporary societies in relation to ideology, gender differences, and state policies such as those concerned with marriage interaction between family members within the family. How they rely on one another. How they work together/rely on the work of someone in the family.Examples of specific issues looked at include:Changing roles of family members. Each member is restricted by the sex roles of the traditional family
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Feminist Sociology
Feminist
Feminist
sociology is a conflict theory and theoretical perspective which observes gender in its relation to power, both at the level of face-to-face interaction and reflexivity within a social structure at large. Focuses include sexual orientation, race, economic status, and nationality. At the core of feminist sociology is the idea of the systematic oppression[note 1] of women and the historical dominance of men within most societies: 'patriarchy'. Feminist
Feminist
thought has a rich history, however, which may be categorized into three 'waves'. The current, 'third wave', emphasizes the concepts of globalization, postcolonialism, post-structuralism and postmodernism
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Sociology Of Gender
Sociology
Sociology
of gender is a prominent subfield of sociology. Social interaction directly correlated with sociology regarding social structure. One of the most important social structures is status. This is determined based on position that an individual possesses which effects how he/she will be treated by society. One of the most important statuses an individual claims is gender.[1] Public discourse and the academic literature generally use the term gender for the perceived or projected (self-identified) masculinity or femininity of a person.[citation needed]Contents1 Introduction 2 In feminist theory 3 Other languages 4 U.S
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Sociology Of Health And Illness
The sociology of health and illness, alternatively the sociology of health and wellness (or simply health sociology), examines the interaction between society and health. The objective of this topic is to see how social life affects morbidity and mortality rate, and vice versa.[1] This aspect of sociology differs from medical sociology in that this branch of sociology discusses health and illness in relation to social institutions such as family, employment, and school. The sociology of medicine limits its concern to the patient-practitioner relationship and the role of health professionals in society.[2] The sociology of health and illness covers sociological pathology (causes of disease and illness), reasons for seeking particular types of medical aid, and patient compliance or noncompliance with medical regimes.[2] Health, or lack of health, was once merely attributed to biological or natural conditions
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Industrial Sociology
Industrial sociology, until recently a crucial research area within the field of sociology of work, examines "the direction and implications of trends in technological change, globalization, labour markets, work organization, managerial practices and employment relations to the extent to which these trends are intimately related to changing patterns of inequality in modern societies and to the changing experiences of individuals and families the ways in which workers challenge, resist and make their own contributions to the patterning of work and shaping of work institutions."[1] Labor process theory[edit] One branch of industrial sociology is Labor process theory (LPT). In 1974, Harry Braverman wrote Labor and Monopoly Capital: The Degradation of Work in the Twentieth Century, which provided a critical analysis of scientific management
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Social Inequality
Social inequality
Social inequality
occurs when resources in a given society are distributed unevenly, typically through norms of allocation, that engender specific patterns along lines of socially defined categories of persons. It is the differentiation preference of access of social goods in the society brought about by power, religion, kinship, prestige, race, ethnicity, gender, age, sexual orientation, and class. The social rights include labor market, the source of income, health care, and freedom of speech, education, political representation, and participation.[1] Social inequality
Social inequality
linked to Economic inequality, usually described on the basis of the unequal distribution of income or wealth, is a frequently studied type of social inequality
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Sociology Of Knowledge
The sociology of knowledge is the study of the relationship between human thought and the social context within which it arises, and of the effects prevailing ideas have on societies. It is not a specialized area of sociology but instead deals with broad fundamental questions about the extent and limits of social influences on individuals' lives and the social-cultural basics of our knowledge about the world.[1] Complementary to the sociology of knowledge is the sociology of ignorance,[2] including the study of nescience, ignorance, knowledge gaps, or non-knowledge as inherent features of knowledge making.[3][4][5] The sociology of knowledge was pioneered primarily by the sociologist Émile Durkheim
Émile Durkheim
at beginning of the 20th century. His work deals directly with how conceptual thought, language, and logic could be influenced by the sociological milieu out of which they arise
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Sociology Of Literature
The sociology of literature is a subfield of the sociology of culture. It studies the social production of literature and its social implications. A notable example is Pierre Bourdieu's 1992 Les Règles de L'Art: Genèse et Structure du Champ Littéraire, translated by Susan Emanuel as Rules of Art: Genesis and Structure of the Literary Field (1996).Contents1 Classical sociology 2 Lukács and the theory of the novel 3 The Frankfurt School 4 The sociology of the avant-garde 5 The sociology of the book trade 6 Genetic structuralism 7 Sociocriticism 8 Neo-Marxian ideology critique 9 Bourdieu 10 The rise of the novel 11 Cultural materialism 12 World-systems theory 13 Recent developments 14 Notes 15 ReferencesClassical sociology[edit] None of the 'founding fathers' of sociology produced a detailed study of literature, but they did develop ideas that were subsequently applied to literature by others
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Deviance (sociology)
In sociology, deviance describes an action or behavior that violates social norms, including a formally enacted rule (e.g., crime),[1] as well as informal violations of social norms (e.g., rejecting folkways and mores). Although deviance may have a negative connotation, the violation of social norms is not always a negative action; positive deviation exists in some situations. This is where the norm is violated, yet the behavior can still be classified as positive or acceptable.[2] It is the purview of criminologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, and sociologists to study how these norms are created, how they change over time, and how they are enforced. Norms are rules and expectations by which members of society are conventionally guided. Deviance is an absence of conformity to these norms. Social norms differ from culture to culture
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Medical Sociology
Medical
Medical
sociology is the sociological analysis of medical organizations and institutions; the production of knowledge and selection of methods, the actions and interactions of healthcare professionals, and the social or cultural (rather than clinical or bodily) effects of medical practice. The field commonly interacts with the sociology of knowledge, science and technology studies, and social epistemology. Medical
Medical
sociologists are also interested in the qualitative experiences of patients, often working at the boundaries of public health, psychology, social work, demography and gerontology to explore phenomena at the intersection of the social and clinical sciences. Health disparities
Health disparities
commonly relate to typical categories such as class and race
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