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Red Heifer
The red heifer (Hebrew: פָרָה אֲדֻמָּה‬; para adumma), also known as the red cow, was a cow brought to the priests as a sacrifice according to the Hebrew Bible, and its ashes were used for the ritual purification of Tum'at HaMet ("the impurity of the dead"), that is, an Israelite
Israelite
who had come into contact with a corpse.[1]Contents1 Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
(Torah)1.1 Book of Numbers2 Mishnah2.1 Details of the commandment 2.2 Jewish tradition 2.3 Temple Institute3 Christian tradition3.1 Christians4 Ancient Greek mythology 5 Modern-day usage 6 References 7 External links Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
(Torah)[edit] Book of Numbers[edit] According to: "Speak unto the children of Israel, that they bring thee a red heifer without spot, wherein is no blemish, and upon which never came yoke"
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Judaic
Judaism
Judaism
(originally from Hebrew יהודה‬, Yehudah, "Judah";[1][2] via Latin
Latin
and Greek) is an ancient, monotheistic, Abrahamic religion with the Torah
Torah
as its foundational text.[3] It encompasses the religion, philosophy and culture of the Jewish people.[4] Judaism
Judaism
is considered by religious Jews
Jews
to be the expression of the covenant that God
God
established with the Children of Israel.[5] Judaism
Judaism
includes a wide corpus of texts, practices, theological positions, and forms of organization. The Torah
Torah
is part of the larger text known as the Tanakh or the Hebrew Bible, and supplemental oral tradition represented by later texts such as the Midrash
Midrash
and the Talmud
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Halakha
Halakha (/hɑːˈlɔːxə/;[1] Hebrew: הֲלָכָה‬, Sephardic: [halaˈχa]; also transliterated as halacha, halakhah, halachah or halocho) (Ashkenazic: [haˈloχo]) is the collective body of Jewish religious laws derived from the Written and Oral Torah. It is based on biblical laws or "commandments" (mitzvot) (traditionally numbered as 613), subsequent Talmudic and rabbinic law and the customs and traditions compiled in the many books, one of the most famous of which is the 16th-century Shulchan Aruch
Shulchan Aruch
(literally "Prepared Table"). Halakha is often translated as " Jewish
Jewish
Law", although a more literal translation might be "the way to behave" or "the way of walking". The word derives from the root that means "to behave" (also "to go" or "to walk")
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Water Of Lustration
The water of lustration or water of purification was the water created with the ashes of the red heifer, according to the instructions given by God to Moses
Moses
and Aaron
Aaron
in the Book of Numbers.[1] The Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
taught that any Israelite who touched a corpse, a Tumat HaMet (literally, "impurity of the dead"), was ritually unclean. The water was to be sprinkled on a person who had touched a corpse, on the third and seventh days after doing so, in order to make the person ritually clean again.[2] A tent in which someone had died was similarly considered to be unclean.[3] The water was to be used as follows:An unclean person they shall take some of the ashes of the heifer burnt for purification from sin, and running water shall be put on them in a vessel
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Kohen
Four gifts given in Jerusalem 11. Firstborn animal · 12. Firstfruits 13. Burnt offering (Judaism) · 14. Parts of the thank offering and Nazirite's offering Ten gifts given (even) outside of Jerusalem 15. Heave offering 16. Heave offering of the Levite's tithe 17. Dough offering 18. First shearing of the sheep 19. Shoulder, cheeks and maw 20. Coins for redemption of the first born son · 21. Redemption of a donkey  · 22. Dedication of property to a priest  · 23. Field not redeemed in a Jubilee year · 24
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Mishnah
—— Tannaitic ——Mishnah Tosefta—— Amoraic (Gemara) ——Jerusalem Talmud Babylonian Talmud—— Later ——Minor TractatesHalakhic Midrash—— Exodus ——Mekhilta of Rabbi
Rabbi
Ishmael Mekhilta of Rabbi Shimon
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Oral Law
An oral law is a code of conduct in use in a given culture, religion or community application, by which a body of rules of human behaviour is transmitted by oral tradition and effectively respected, or the single rule that is orally transmitted. Many cultures have an oral law, while most contemporary legal systems have a formal written organisation. The oral tradition (from the Latin tradere = to transmit) is the typical instrument of transmission of the oral codes or, in a more general sense, is the complex of what a culture transmits of itself among the generations, "from father to son". This kind of transmission can be due to lack of other means, such as in illiterate or criminal societies, or can be expressly required by the same law. There has been a continuous debate over oral versus written transmission, with the focus on the perceived higher reliability of written evidence,[1] primarily based on the "linear world of academia" where only written down records are accepted
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Gemara
—— Tannaitic ——Mishnah Tosefta—— Amoraic (Gemara) ——Jerusalem Talmud Babylonian Talmud—— Later ——Minor TractatesHalakhic Midrash—— Exodus ——Mekhilta of Rabbi Ishmael Mekhilta of Rabbi Shimon
Mekhilta of Rabbi Shimon
bar Yohai—— Leviticus —— Sifra
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Korban
In Judaism, the korban, (Hebrew: קָרְבָּן‬ qārbān; Arabic: قربان‎), also spelled qorban or corban, is any of a variety of sacrificial offerings described and commanded in the Torah. The plural form is korbanot. The most common usages are animal sacrifice (zevah זֶבַח), peace offering and olah "holocaust." A korban was a kosher animal sacrifice, such as a bull, sheep, goat, deer or a dove that underwent shechita (Jewish ritual slaughter). Sacrifices could also consist of grain, meal, wine, or incense.[1][2][3] Offerings were often cooked and most of it eaten by the offerer, with parts given to the Kohen
Kohen
priests and small parts burned on the altar of the Temple in Jerusalem
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Spring (hydrosphere)
A spring is any natural situation where water flows from an aquifer to the Earth's surface. It is a component of the hydrosphere.Contents1 Formation1.1 Types2 Flow2.1 Classification3 Water
Water
content 4 Uses4.1 Sacred springs5 Notable springs 6 See also 7 References7.1 Citations 7.2 Further reading8 External linksFormation[edit]A natural spring on Mackinac Island
Mackinac Island
in MichiganA spring may be the result of karst topography where surface water has infiltrated the Earth's surface (recharge area), becoming part of the area groundwater. The groundwater then travels through a network of cracks and fissure—openings ranging from intergranular spaces to large caves
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Pool Of Siloam
The Pool of Siloam
Siloam
(Hebrew: בריכת השילוח‎, Breikhat Hashiloah) was a rock-cut pool on the southern slope of the City of David, the original site of Jerusalem, located outside the walls of the Old City to the southeast. The pool was fed by the waters of the Gihon Spring, carried there by two aqueducts.Contents1 History1.1 Initial Construction 1.2 Second Temple
Second Temple
Period 1.3 Roman Period 1.4 Byzantine
Byzantine
Period2 See also 3 References 4 Further readingHistory[edit] Initial Construction[edit] The Pool of Siloam
Siloam
was first built during the reign of Hezekiah (715–687/6 BCE), to provide a water supply inside the City to protect it from a siege. The pool was fed by the newly constructed Siloam
Siloam
tunnel
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Parah
Parah (Hebrew: פָּרָה‬) is the name of a treatise in the Mishnah
Mishnah
and the Tosefta, included in the order Tohorot. The Pentateuchal
Pentateuchal
law ( Num.
Num.
19) decrees that a red heifer, "wherein is no blemish, and upon which never came yoke," shall be burned and her ashes mixed with spring water, that the compound so obtained may be used to sprinkle and cleanse every one who becomes unclean. The burning of the heifer and the preparation of the ashes, as well as the fetching of the water and its mixture for sprinkling, were attended by strict ceremonies
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Shechitah
The Hebrew term shechita (anglicized: /ʃəxiːˈtɑː/; Hebrew: שחיטה‬; [ʃχiˈta]; also transliterated shehitah, shechitah, shehita) means the slaughtering of certain mammals and birds for food according to Kashrut
Kashrut
(Deut. 12:21, Deut. 14:21, Num. 11:22).Contents1 Biblical source 2 Species 3 Shochtim 4 Procedure 5 Forbidden techniques 6 The knife 7 Other rules 8 Post-procedure requirements8.1 Bedikah8.1.1 Glatt8.2 Nikkur 8.3 Blood removal 8.4 Giving of the Gifts9 Animal welfare
Animal welfare
controversies9.1 General description of controversy 9.2 Efforts to improve conditions in shechita slaughterhouses 9.3 Agriprocessors
Agriprocessors
controversy10 See also 11 References 12 Further reading 13 External linksBiblical source[edit] The Torah
Torah
(Deut
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Mount Of Olives
The Mount of Olives
Mount of Olives
or Mount Olivet (Hebrew: הַר הַזֵּיתִים‬, Har ha-Zeitim; Arabic: جبل الزيتون, الطور‎, Jabal al-Zaytun, Al-Tur) is a mountain ridge east of and adjacent to Jerusalem's Old City.[1] It is named for the olive groves that once covered its slopes. The southern part of the Mount was the Silwan
Silwan
necropolis, attributed to the ancient Judean kingdom.[2] The Mount has been used as a Jewish cemetery
Jewish cemetery
for over 3,000 years and holds approximately 150,000 graves, making it central in the tradition of Jewish cemeteries.[3] Several key events in the life of Jesus, as related in the Gospels, took place on the Mount of Olives, and in the Acts of the Apostles
Acts of the Apostles
it is described as the place from which Jesus
Jesus
ascended to heaven
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Moses
Moses
Moses
(/ˈmoʊzɪz, -zɪs/)[2][Note 1] was a prophet in the Abrahamic religions. According to the Hebrew Bible, he was adopted by an Egyptian princess, and later in life became the leader of the Israelites
Israelites
and lawgiver, to whom the authorship of the Torah, or acquisition of the Torah
Torah
from Heaven is traditionally attributed
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Ezra
Ezra
Ezra
(/ˈɛzrə/; Hebrew: עזרא‬, Ezra;[1] fl. 480–440 BCE), also called Ezra
Ezra
the Scribe (עזרא הסופר‬, Ezra
Ezra
ha-Sofer) and Ezra
Ezra
the Priest in the Book of Ezra, was a Jewish scribe and a priest
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