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Pryeria Sinica
Pryeria sinica, the euonymus leaf notcher, is a species of moth of the Zygaenidae
Zygaenidae
family. It is native to Asia
Asia
and an invasive species in the United States, where it has been found in Maryland
Maryland
and Virginia
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Taxonomy (biology)
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
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Celastrus
See textCelastrus, commonly known as staff vine, staff tree or bittersweet, is a genus in the Celastraceae
Celastraceae
family which comprises about 30-40 species of shrubs and vines. They have a wide distribution in East Asia, Australasia, Africa, and the Americas. Celastrus
Celastrus
orbiculatusThe leaves are alternate and simple, ovoid, and typically 5–20 cm (2.0–7.9 in) long. The flowers are small, white, pink or greenish, and borne in long panicles; the fruit is a three-valved berry. In North America, they are known as bittersweet, presumably a result of confusion with the unrelated bittersweet (Solanum dulcamara) by early colonists. C. orbiculatus is a serious invasive weed in much of eastern North America. Selected species[edit] Celastrus
Celastrus
angulatus Maxim
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Family (biology)
In biological classification, family (Latin: familia, plural familiae) is one of the eight major taxonomic ranks; it is classified between order and genus. A family may be divided into subfamilies, which are intermediate ranks above the rank of genus. In vernacular usage, a family may be named after one of its common members; for example, walnuts and hickory trees belong to the family Juglandaceae, commonly known as the walnut family. What does or does not belong to a family—or whether a described family should be recognized at all—are proposed and determined by practicing taxonomists. There are no hard rules for describing or recognizing a family, or any taxa. Taxonomists often take different positions about descriptions of taxa, and there may be no broad consensus across the scientific community for some time
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National Center For Biotechnology Information
The National Center for Biotechnology
Biotechnology
Information (NCBI) is part of the United States National Library of Medicine
United States National Library of Medicine
(NLM), a branch of the National Institutes of Health
National Institutes of Health
(NIH). The NCBI is located in Bethesda, Maryland and was founded in 1988 through legislation sponsored by Senator Claude Pepper. The NCBI houses a series of databases relevant to biotechnology and biomedicine and is an important resource for bioinformatics tools and services. Major databases include GenBank
GenBank
for DNA
DNA
sequences and PubMed, a bibliographic database for the biomedical literature. Other databases include the NCBI Epigenomics database
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INaturalist
iNaturalist is a citizen science project and online social network of naturalists, citizen scientists, and biologists built on the concept of mapping and sharing observations of biodiversity across the globe.[2] Observations may be added via the website or from a mobile application.[3][4] The observations provide valuable open data to a variety of scientific research projects, museums, botanic gardens, parks, and other organizations.[5][6][7] Users of iNaturalist have contributed over eight million observations[8] since its founding in 2008, and the project has been called "a standard-bearer for natural history mobile applications."[9]Contents1 History 2 Participation 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] iNaturalist.org began in 2008 as a UC Berkeley School of Information Master's final project of Nate Agrin, Jessica Kline, and Ken-ichi Ueda.[1] Nate Agrin and Ken-ichi Ueda continued work on the site with Sean McGregor, a web developer
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Global Biodiversity Information Facility
The Global Biodiversity
Biodiversity
Information Facility (GBIF) is an international organisation that focuses on making scientific data on biodiversity available via the Internet
Internet
using web services. The data are provided by many institutions from around the world; GBIF's information architecture makes these data accessible and searchable through a single portal. Data available through the GBIF portal are primarily distribution data on plants, animals, fungi, and microbes for the world, and scientific names data. The mission of the Global Biodiversity
Biodiversity
information Facility (GBIF) is to facilitate free and open access to biodiversity data worldwide to underpin sustainable development
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EPPO Code
An EPPO code, formerly known as a Bayer code, is an encoded identifier that is used by the European and Mediterranean Plant
Plant
Protection Organization (EPPO), in a system designed to uniquely identify organisms – namely plants, pests and pathogens – that are important to agriculture and crop protection. EPPO codes are a core component of a database of names, both scientific and vernacular. Although originally started by the Bayer Corporation, the official list of codes is now maintained by EPPO.[1]Contents1 EPPO code database1.1 Example2 External links 3 ReferencesEPPO code database[edit] All codes and their associated names are included in a database (EPPO Global Database). In total, there are over 68,500 species listed in the EPPO database, including:[2]36,000 species of plants (e.g. cultivated, wild plants and weeds) 24,000 species of animals (e.g. insects, mites, nematodes, rodents), biocontrol agents 8,500 microorganism species (e.g
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BugGuide
BugGuide (or BugGuide.Net) is a website and online community of naturalists, both amateur and professional, who share observations of insects, spiders, and other related creatures.[1] The website consists of informational guide pages and many thousands of photographs of arthropods from the United States
United States
and Canada
Canada
which are used for identification and research.[2] The non-commercial site is hosted by the Iowa State University
Iowa State University
Department of Entomology. BugGuide was conceived by photographer Troy Bartlett in 2003 and since 2006 has been maintained by Dr
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Wikidata
Wikidata
Wikidata
is a collaboratively edited knowledge base hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. It is intended to provide a common source of data which can be used by Wikimedia projects such as,[4][5] and by anyone else, under a public domain license. This is similar to the way Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons
provides storage for media files and access to those files for all Wikimedia projects, and which are also freely available for reuse. Wikidata
Wikidata
is powered by the software Wikibase.[6]Contents1 Concepts 2 Development history2.1 Phase 1 2.2 Phase 2 2.3 Phase 33 Reception 4 Logo 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksConcepts[edit]ScreenshotsThree statements from Wikidata's item on the planet Mars
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Euonymus Fortunei
Euonymus
Euonymus
fortunei (common names spindle or Fortune's spindle, winter creeper or wintercreeper) is a species of flowering plant in the family Celastraceae, native to east Asia, including China, Korea, the Philippines and Japan.[1] It is named after the plant explorer Robert Fortune.Contents1 Description 2 Varieties 3 Range 4 Cultivation and uses 5 Gallery 6 References 7 External linksDescription[edit] It is an evergreen shrub which grows as a vine if provided with support. As such it grows to 20 m (66 ft), climbing by means of small rootlets on the stems, similar to ivy (an example of convergent evolution, as the two species are not related)
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Euonymus Japonicus
Euonymus
Euonymus
japonicus (evergreen spindle[1] or Japanese spindle) is a species of flowering plant in the family Celastraceae, native to Japan, Korea and China.[2] It is an evergreen shrub or small tree growing to 2–8 m (6 ft 7 in–26 ft 3 in) tall, with opposite, oval leaves 3–7 cm long with finely serrated margins. The flowers are inconspicuous, greenish-white, 5 mm diameter. In autumn, orange fruit hangs below the flaring pink seed coverings. Horticultural cultivars[edit] Euonymus
Euonymus
japonicus is a popular ornamental plant for parks and gardens, both in its native area and also in Europe and North America. In particular the numerous cultivars which have been selected (often with variegated or yellow leaves) are widely grown in all soil types in sun or shade
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Euonymus Alatus
Euonymus
Euonymus
alatus, known variously as winged spindle, winged euonymus or burning bush, is a species of flowering plant in the family Celastraceae, native to central and northern China, Japan, and Korea. This deciduous shrub grows to 6.1 metres (20 ft) tall, often wider than tall. As with the related Euonymus
Euonymus
phellomanus, the stems are notable for their four corky ridges or "wings". The word alatus (or alata, used formerly) is Latin for "winged", in reference to the winged branches. These structures develop from a cork cambium deposited in longitudinal grooves in the twigs' first year, unlike similar wings in other plants.[1] The leaves are 2–7 centimetres (0.79–2.76 in) long and 1–4 centimetres (0.39–1.57 in) broad, ovate-elliptic, with an acute apex. The flowers are greenish, borne over a long period in the spring
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Euonymus
See textSynonymsKalonymus (Beck) Prokh. Pragmotessara Pierre Pragmotropa Pierre Quadripterygium Tardieu Sphaerodiscus Nakai[1] Euonymus
Euonymus
/juːˈɒnɪməs/ is a genus of flowering plants in the staff vine family, Celastraceae. Common names vary widely among different species and between different English-speaking countries, but include spindle (or spindle tree), burning-bush, strawberry-bush, wahoo, wintercreeper, or simply euonymus. It comprises about 130 species[2][3] of deciduous and evergreen shrubs, small trees and lianas. They are mostly native to East Asia, extending to the Himalayas,[4] and they are also distributed in Europe, Australasia, North America, and Madagascar
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Animalia
Animals are multicellular eukaryotic organisms that form the biological kingdom Animalia. With few exceptions, animals consume organic material, breathe oxygen, are able to move, reproduce sexually, and grow from a hollow sphere of cells, the blastula, during embryonic development. Over 1.5 million living animal species have been described—of which around 1 million are insects—but it has been estimated there are over 7 million in total. Animals range in size from 8.5 millionths of a metre to 33.6 metres (110 ft) long and have complex interactions with each other and their environments, forming intricate food webs. The study of animals is called zoology. Aristotle divided animals into those with blood and those without. Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus
created the first hierarchical biological classification for animals in 1758 with his Systema Naturae, which Jean-Baptiste Lamarck expanded into 14 phyla by 1809
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