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Polesie State Radioecological Reserve
The Polesie
Polesie
State Radioecological Reserve (Belarusian: Палескі дзяржаўны радыяцыйна-экалагічны запаведнік, Russian: Полесский государственный радиационно-экологический заповедник) ( Acronym PSRER) is a nature reserve in Belarus, which was created to enclose the territory of Belarus
Belarus
most affected by radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl
Chernobyl
disaster. Also known as Zapovednik (Russian for "nature reserve"),[2] it adjoins the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone in Ukraine
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OpenStreetMap
OpenStreet Map
Map
(OSM) is a collaborative project to create a free editable map of the world. The creation and growth of OSM has been motivated by restrictions on use or availability of map information across much of the world, and the advent of inexpensive portable satellite navigation devices.[6] OSM is considered a prominent example of volunteered geographic information. Created by Steve Coast
Steve Coast
in the UK in 2004, it was inspired by the success of[7] and the predominance of proprietary map data in the UK and elsewhere.[8] Since then, it has grown to over 2 million registered users,[9] who can collect data using manual survey, GPS devices, aerial photography, and other free sources. This crowdsourced data is then made available under the Open Database Licence
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Reptile
See text for extinct groups.Global reptile distribution (excluding birds)Reptiles are tetrapod animals in the class Reptilia, comprising today's turtles, crocodilians, snakes, amphisbaenians, lizards, tuatara, and their extinct relatives. The study of these traditional reptile orders, historically combined with that of modern amphibians, is called herpetology. Because some reptiles are more closely related to birds than they are to other reptiles (e.g., crocodiles are more closely related to birds than they are to lizards), the traditional groups of "reptiles" listed above do not together constitute a monophyletic grouping or clade (consisting of all descendants of a common ancestor)
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Mazyr
Mazyr
Mazyr
(Belarusian: Мазы́р, pronounced [maˈzɨr]; Russian: Мозырь Mozir, Polish: Mozyrz) is a city in Gomel Region
Gomel Region
of Belarus
Belarus
on the Pripyat River
Pripyat River
about 210 kilometres (130 miles) east of Pinsk
Pinsk
and 100 kilometres (62 miles) northwest of Chernobyl
Chernobyl
and is located at approximately 52°03′N 29°15′E / 52.050°N 29.250°E / 52.050; 29.250. The population is 111,770 (2004 estimate). The total urban area including Kalinkavichy
Kalinkavichy
across the river has a population of 150,000. Mozyr is known as a center of oil refining, machine building, and food processing in Belarus. It is home to one of the largest oil refineries in Belarus, pumping out 18 million metric tons per year
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Pripyat River
The Pripyat
Pripyat
River or Prypiat River (Ukrainian: Прип’ять Prypyat′, pronounced [ˈprɪpjɑtʲ]; Belarusian: Прыпяць Prypiać, [ˈprɨpʲat͡sʲ]; Polish: Prypeć, [ˈprɨpɛtɕ]; Russian: Припять Pripyat′, [ˈprʲipʲɪtʲ]) is a river in Eastern Europe, approximately 761 km (473 mi) long.[1] It flows east through Ukraine, Belarus, and Ukraine
Ukraine
again, draining into the Dnieper.Contents1 Overview 2 Name etymology 3 See also 4 Books 5 References 6 External linksOverview[edit] The Pripyat
Pripyat
passes through the exclusion zone established around the site of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. The city of Prypiat, Ukraine (population 45,000) was completely evacuated after the Chernobyl disaster. Pripyat
Pripyat
has catchment area of 121,000 km2 (47,000 sq mi), 50,900 km2 (19,700 sq mi) of which are in Belarus
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Ghost Town
A ghost town is an abandoned village, town, or city, usually one that contains substantial visible remains. A town often becomes a ghost town because the economic activity that supported it has failed, or due to natural or human-caused disasters such as floods, prolonged droughts, government actions, uncontrolled lawlessness, war, pollution, or nuclear disasters. The term can sometimes refer to cities, towns, and neighborhoods that are still populated, but significantly less so than in years past; for example those affected by high levels of unemployment and dereliction.[1] Some ghost towns, especially those that preserve period-specific architecture, have become tourist attractions
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Soviet Census (1959)
The Soviet Census
Census
conducted in January 1959 was the first post-World War II census held in the Soviet Union.[1] Background[edit] For a decade after World War II, there were no new population statistics released by the Soviet Union,[2] and a proposal for a new Soviet census for 1949 was rejected by Soviet leader
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European Bison
The European bison
European bison
( Bison
Bison
bonasus), also known as wisent (/ˈviːzənt/ or /ˈwiːzənt/) or the European wood bison, is a Eurasian species of bison. It is one of two extant species of bison, alongside the American bison. Three subspecies existed in the recent past, but only one survives today. The species is, theoretically, descended from a hybrid, a cross between a female aurochs, the extinct wild ancestor of modern cattle, and a male Steppe
Steppe
bison; the possible hybrid is referred to informally as the Higgs bison.[2][3] Alternatively, the Pleistocene woodland bison has been suggested as the ancestor to the species.[4][5] European bison
European bison
were hunted to extinction in the wild in the early 20th century, with the last wild animals of the B. b
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Przewalski Horse
hagenbecki Matschie, 1903 prjevalskii Ewart, 1903 typicus Max Hilzheimer (de), 1909Przewalski's Horse
Horse
in the Chernobyl Exclusion ZoneThe Przewalski's horse
Przewalski's horse<

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Golden Eagle
The golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) is one of the best-known birds of prey in the Northern Hemisphere. It is the most widely distributed species of eagle. Like all eagles, it belongs to the family Accipitridae. These birds are dark brown, with lighter golden-brown plumage on their napes. Immature eagles of this species typically have white on the tail and often have white markings on the wings. Golden eagles use their agility and speed combined with powerful feet and massive, sharp talons to snatch up a variety of prey, mainly hares, rabbits, marmots and other ground squirrels.[2] Golden eagles maintain home ranges or territories that may be as large as 200 km2 (77 sq mi). They build large nests in cliffs and other high places to which they may return for several breeding years. Most breeding activities take place in the spring; they are monogamous and may remain together for several years or possibly for life
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White-tailed Eagle
Falco albicilla Linnaeus, 1758 Haliaeetus
Haliaeetus
albicilla albicilla Haliaeetus
Haliaeetus
albicilla groenlandicusThe white-tailed eagle ( Haliaeetus
Haliaeetus
albicilla), also known as the ern, erne, gray eagle, Eurasian sea eagle and white-tailed sea-eagle[citation needed], is a large bird of prey in the family Accipitridae
Accipitridae
which includes other raptors such as hawks, kites, and harriers. They are found in Eurasia, near large bodies of open water with an abundant food supply and old-growth trees for nesting
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Amphibian
Amphibians are ectothermic, tetrapod vertebrates of the class Amphibia. Modern amphibians are all Lissamphibia. They inhabit a wide variety of habitats, with most species living within terrestrial, fossorial, arboreal or freshwater aquatic ecosystems. Thus amphibians typically start out as larvae living in water, but some species have developed behavioural adaptations to bypass this. The young generally undergo metamorphosis from larva with gills to an adult air-breathing form with lungs. Amphibians use their skin as a secondary respiratory surface and some small terrestrial salamanders and frogs lack lungs and rely entirely on their skin. They are superficially similar to lizards but, along with mammals and birds, reptiles are amniotes and do not require water bodies in which to breed
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Europe
Europe
Europe
is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere. It is bordered by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean to the north, the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the west, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. It comprises the westernmost part of Eurasia. Since around 1850, Europe
Europe
is most commonly considered as separated from Asia
Asia
by the watershed divides of the Ural and Caucasus
Caucasus
Mountains, the Ural River, the Caspian and Black Seas, and the waterways of the Turkish Straits.[5] Though the term "continent" implies physical geography, the land border is somewhat arbitrary and has moved since its first conception in classical antiquity
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Mammal
Mammals are the vertebrates within the class Mammalia (/məˈmeɪliə/ from Latin mamma "breast"), a clade of endothermic amniotes distinguished from reptiles (including birds) by the possession of a neocortex (a region of the brain), hair, three middle ear bones, and mammary glands. Females of all mammal species nurse their young with milk, secreted from the mammary glands. Mammals include the largest animal on the planet, the blue whale. The basic body type is a terrestrial quadruped, but some mammals are adapted for life at sea, in the air, in trees, underground or on two legs. The largest group of mammals, the placentals, have a placenta, which enables the feeding of the fetus during gestation. Mammals range in size from the 30–40 mm (1.2–1.6 in) bumblebee bat to the 30-meter (98 ft) blue whale. With the exception of the five species of monotreme (egg-laying mammals), all modern mammals give birth to live young
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Bird
Birds (Aves) are a group of endothermic vertebrates, characterised by feathers, toothless beaked jaws, the laying of hard-shelled eggs, a high metabolic rate, a four-chambered heart, and a strong yet lightweight skeleton. Birds live worldwide and range in size from the 5 cm (2 in) bee hummingbird to the 2.75 m (9 ft) ostrich. They rank as the world’s most numerically-successful class of tetrapods, with approximately ten thousand living species, more than half of these being passerines, sometimes known as perching birds. Birds have wings which are more or less developed depending on the species; the only known groups without wings are the extinct moa and elephant birds. Wings, which evolved from forelimbs, gave birds the ability to fly, although further evolution has led to the loss of flight in flightless birds, including ratites, penguins, and diverse endemic island species of birds
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Fish
Tetrapods Fish
Fish
are the gill-bearing aquatic craniate animals that lack limbs with digits. They form a sister group to the tunicates, together forming the olfactores. Included in this definition are the living hagfish, lampreys, and cartilaginous and bony fish as well as various extinct related groups. Tetrapods emerged within lobe-finned fishes, so cladistically they are fish as well. However, traditionally fish are rendered paraphyletic by excluding the tetrapods (i.e., the amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals which all descended from within the same ancestry). Because in this manner the term "fish" is defined negatively as a paraphyletic group, it is not considered a formal taxonomic grouping in systematic biology
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