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Otokar
Otokar
Otokar
Otomotiv ve Savunma Sanayi A.Ş., also known simply as Otokar, is a Turkish buses and military vehicles manufacturer headquartered in Sakarya, Turkey
Turkey
and a subsidiary of Koç Holding.Contents1 History 2 Vehicles2.1 Minibuses 2.2 Buses 2.3 Trailers 2.4 Utility 2.5 Military3 References 4 SourcesHistory[edit] Otokar
Otokar
began business in 1963 as Turkey's first intercity bus manufacturing company under the license of Magirus
Magirus
Deutz of Istanbul. Otokar
Otokar
was noted for manufacturing the most modern buses and modern intercity vehicles for that period. During the 1970s, Otokar
Otokar
launched air-cooled minibuses with Deutz AG
Deutz AG
engines
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List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
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Military Tactics
Military
Military
tactics are the science and art of organizing a military force, and the techniques for combining and using weapons and military units to engage and defeat an enemy in battle.[1] Changes in philosophy and technology have been reflected in changes to military tactics. In contemporary military science, tactics are the lowest of three planning levels: (i) strategic, (ii) operational, and (iii) tactical. The highest level of planning is strategy: how force is translated into political objectives by bridging the means and ends of war. The intermediate level, operational, the conversion of strategy into tactics, deals with formations of units
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Armored Vehicle
Military vehicles are commonly armoured (or armored; see spelling differences) to withstand the impact of shrapnel, bullets, missiles or shells, protecting the personnel inside from enemy fire. Such vehicles include armoured fighting vehicles like tanks, aircraft and ships. Civilian vehicles may also be armoured. These vehicles include cars used by reporters, officials and others in conflict zones or where violent crime is common, and presidential limousines. Civilian armoured cars are also routinely used by security firms to carry money or valuables to reduce the risk of highway robbery or the hijacking of the cargo. Armour
Armour
may also be used in vehicles to protect from threats other than a deliberate attack. Some spacecraft are equipped with specialised armour to protect them against impacts from micrometeoroids or fragments of space junk
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Armored Car (military)
A military armored (or armoured) car is a lightweight wheeled armored fighting vehicle, historically employed for reconnaissance, internal security, armed escort, and other subordinate battlefield tasks.[1] With the gradual decline of mounted cavalry, armored cars were developed for carrying out duties formerly assigned to horsemen.[2] Following the invention of the tank, the armored car remained popular due to its comparatively simplified maintenance and low production cost. It also found favor with several colonial armies as a cheaper weapon for use in underdeveloped regions.[3] During World War II, most armored cars were engineered for reconnaissance and passive observation, while others were devoted to communications tasks
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Textiles
A textile[1] is a flexible material consisting of a network of natural or artificial fibres (yarn or thread). Yarn
Yarn
is produced by spinning raw fibres of wool, flax, cotton, hemp, or other materials to produce long strands.[2] Textiles are formed by weaving, knitting, crocheting, knotting, or felting. The related words fabric[3] and cloth[4] are often used in textile assembly trades (such as tailoring and dressmaking) as synonyms for textile. However, there are subtle differences in these terms in specialized usage. A textile is any material made of interlacing fibres, including carpeting and geotextiles. A fabric is a material made through weaving, knitting, spreading, crocheting, or bonding that may be used in production of further goods (garments, etc.)
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S.A. (corporation)
S.A. (and variants) designates a type of corporation in countries that mostly employ civil law. Depending on language, it means anonymous company, anonymous partnership, or share company, roughly equivalent to public limited company in common law jurisdictions. It is different from partnerships and private limited companies. Originally, shareholders could be literally anonymous and collect dividends by surrendering coupons attached to their share certificates. Dividends were therefore paid to whomever held the certificate. Share certificates could be transferred privately, and therefore the management of the company would not necessarily know who owned its shares. Like bearer bonds, anonymous, illegal unregistered share ownership and dividend collection enabled money laundering, tax evasion, and concealed business transactions in general, so governments passed laws to audit the practice
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LCD TV
Liquid-crystal-display televisions (LCD TV) are television sets that use liquid-crystal displays to produce images. LCD televisions are thinner and lighter than cathode ray tube (CRTs) of similar display size, and are available in much larger sizes. When manufacturing costs fell, this combination of features made LCDs practical for television receivers. In 2007, LCD televisions surpassed sales of CRT-based televisions worldwide for the first time,[citation needed] and their sales figures relative to other technologies are accelerating. LCD TVs are quickly displacing the only major competitors in the large-screen market, the plasma display panel and rear-projection television. LCDs are, by far, the most widely produced and sold television display type. LCDs also have a variety of disadvantages
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MP3 Player
An MP3
MP3
player or Digital Audio Player is an electronic device that can play digital audio files. It is a type of Portable Media Player. The term ' MP3
MP3
player' is a misnomer, as most players play more than the MP3
MP3
file format. Since the MP3
MP3
format is widely used, almost all players can play that format. In addition, there are many other digital audio formats. Some formats are proprietary, such as MP3, Windows Media Audio
Windows Media Audio
(WMA), and Advanced Audio Coding (AAC). Some of these formats also may incorporate digital rights management (DRM), such as WMA DRM, which are often part of paid download sites
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Four Wheel Drive
The Four Wheel Drive
Four Wheel Drive
Auto Company, more often known as Four Wheel Drive (FWD), was a pioneering American company that developed and produced all-wheel drive vehicles. It was founded in 1909 in Clintonville, Wisconsin, as the Badger Four-Wheel Drive Auto Company by Otto Zachow and William Besserdich.[1] The first production facility was built in 1911 and was designed by architect Wallace W. DeLong of Appleton Wisconsin.[2]Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Four Wheel Drive
Four Wheel Drive
Auto Company 1918 ad in The Horseless Age.Share of the Four Wheel Drive
Four Wheel Drive
Auto Co., issued 6. May 1919Zachow and Besserdich developed and built the first successful four-wheel drive (4x4) car, the "Battleship", in 1908. Its success led to the founding of the company
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Arifiye
Arifiye
Arifiye
is a district center of Sakarya Province, Turkey. It is also included in Greater Sakarya Proper.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Economy 4 Rural Area 5 ReferencesGeography[edit] Arifiye
Arifiye
is situated at 40°43′N 30°22′E / 40.717°N 30.367°E / 40.717; 30.367 just at the east of Lake Sapanca. It is almost merged to Adapazarı
Adapazarı
the center of the province and it is a part of Greater Sakarya. (see Metropolitan centers in Turkey). Arifiye is on Turkish Motorway O-4 and state highway both of which connect İstanbul
İstanbul
to Ankara. It is also an important railway junction. The population of Arifiye
Arifiye
was 32550 [3] as of 2010. History[edit] Arifiye
Arifiye
is a part of ancient region of Bithynia. It later on fell to Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and Byzantine Empire
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Conglomerate (company)
A conglomerate is the combination of two or more corporations engaged in entirely different businesses that fall under one corporate group, usually involving a parent company and many subsidiaries. Often, a conglomerate is a multi-industry company. Conglomerates are often large and multinational. Conglomerates were popular in the 1960s due to a combination of low interest rates and a repeating bear-bull market, which allowed the conglomerates to buy companies in leveraged buyouts, sometimes at temporarily deflated values
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Singapore Technologies Kinetics
Singapore
Singapore
Technologies Kinetics Ltd (ST Kinetics), in Singapore, is a strategic business area of ST Engineering
ST Engineering
and handles land systems and specialty vehicles. In 2000, ST Engineering
ST Engineering
acquired the Chartered Industries of Singapore (CIS) through ST Automotive, a subsidiary of ST Engineering, and the new company was named ST Kinetics. Given the initial charter of CIS to support the local defence requirements, the main defence customer of ST Kinetics remains as the Singapore
Singapore
Armed Forces (SAF). Besides manufacturing small arms and munitions, some of ST Kinetics' key military products include the SAR-21
SAR-21
assault rifle, the Bionix AFV, the Bronco ATTC
Bronco ATTC
and the Terrex
Terrex
APC. These weapons and ammunition are often made to U.S
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VCD
Video
Video
CD (abbreviated as VCD, and also known as Compact Disc digital video) is a home video format and the first format for distributing films on standard 120 mm (4.7 in) optical discs. The format was widely adopted in Southeast Asia
Southeast Asia
and superseded the VHS
VHS
and Betamax
Betamax
systems in the region until DVD
DVD
finally became affordable in the region in the late 2000s. The format is a standard digital format for storing video on a compact disc
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DVD Player
A DVD
DVD
player is a device that plays DVD
DVD
discs produced under both the DVD-Video
DVD-Video
and DVD-Audio
DVD-Audio
technical standards, two different and incompatible standards. Some DVD
DVD
players will also play audio CDs. DVD players are connected to a television to watch the DVD
DVD
content, which could be a movie, a recorded TV show, or other content. The first DVD
DVD
player was created by Sony
Sony
Corporation in Taiwan in collaboration with Pacific Digital Company from the United States
United States
in 1997.[citation needed] Some manufacturers originally announced that DVD
DVD
players would be available as early as the middle of 1996. These predictions were too optimistic
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Refrigerator
A refrigerator (colloquially fridge, or fridgefreezer in the UK) is a popular household appliance that consists of a thermally insulated compartment and a heat pump (mechanical, electronic or chemical) that transfers heat from the inside of the fridge to its external environment so that the inside of the fridge is cooled to a temperature below the ambient temperature of the room. Refrigeration is an essential food storage technique in developed countries. The lower temperature lowers the reproduction rate of bacteria, so the refrigerator reduces the rate of spoilage. A refrigerator maintains a temperature a few degrees above the freezing point of water. Optimum temperature range for perishable food storage is 3 to 5 °C (37 to 41 °F).[1] A similar device that maintains a temperature below the freezing point of water is called a freezer. The refrigerator replaced the icebox, which had been a common household appliance for almost a century and a half
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