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Northwestern University
Northwestern University
University
(NU) is a private research university based in Evanston, Illinois, United States, with other campuses located in Chicago
Chicago
and Doha, Qatar, and academic programs and facilities in
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Academy Award
MoonlightBest Picture The Shape of WaterThe Academy Awards, also known as the Oscars,[1] are a set of 24 awards for artistic and technical merit in the American film industry, given annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), to recognize excellence in cinematic achievements as assessed by the Academy's voting membership. The various category winners are awarded a copy of a golden statuette, officially called the "Academy Award of Merit", which has become commonly known by its nickname "Oscar". The sculpture was created by George Stanley.[2] The awards, first presented in 1929 at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, are overseen by AMPAS.[3][4] The awards ceremony was first broadcast on radio in 1930 and televised for the first time in 1953. It is now seen live in more than 200 countries and can be streamed live online.[5] The Academy Awards ceremony is the oldest worldwide entertainment awards ceremony
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Financial Endowment
A financial endowment is a donation of money or property to a nonprofit organization for the ongoing support of that organization. Usually the endowment is structured so that the principal amount is kept intact, while the investment income is available for use, or part of the principal is released each year, which allows for their donation to have an impact over a longer period than if it were spent all at once. An endowment may come with stipulations regarding its usage. The total value of an institution's investments is often referred to as the institution's endowment and is typically organized as a public charity, private foundation, or trust
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Academic Quarter (year Division)
An academic quarter refers to the division of an academic year into four parts.Contents1 Historical Context 2 United States2.1 Background and Trends 2.2 Arguments3 See also 4 ReferencesHistorical Context[edit] The modern academic quarter calendar can be traced to the historic English law court / legal training pupillage four term system:Hilary: January–March Easter: April–May Trinity: June–July Michaelmas: October–DecemberThis quarter system was adopted by the oldest universities in the English-speaking world (Oxford, founded circa 1096,[1] and Cambridge, founded circa 1209[2]). Over time, Cambridge dropped Trinity Term and renamed Hilary Term to Lent Term, and Oxford also dropped the original Trinity Term and renamed Easter Term as Trinity Term, thus establishing the three-term academic "quarter" year widely found in countries with a lineage to England or the United Kingdom. United States[edit] Background and Trends[edit] In the
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Urban Area
An urban area is a human settlement with high population density and infrastructure of built environment. Urban areas are created through urbanization and are categorized by urban morphology as cities, towns, conurbations or suburbs. In urbanism, the term contrasts to rural areas such as villages and hamlets and in urban sociology or urban anthropology it contrasts with natural environment
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Postgraduate Education
Postgraduate
Postgraduate
education, or graduate education in North America, involves learning and studying for academic or professional degrees, academic or professional certificates, academic or professional diplomas, or other qualifications for which a first or bachelor's degree generally is required, and it is normally considered to be part of higher education. In North America, this level is generally referred to as graduate school (or sometimes colloquially as grad school). The organization and structure of postgraduate education varies in different countries, as well as in different institutions within countries
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Undergraduate Education
Undergraduate education is the post-secondary education previous to the postgraduate education. It includes all the academic programs up to the level of a bachelor's degree. For example, in the United States, an entry level university student is known as an undergraduate, while students of higher degrees are known as graduates
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NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
(D-I) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) in the United States. D-I schools include the major collegiate athletic powers, with larger budgets, more elaborate facilities and more athletic scholarships than Divisions II and III as well as many smaller schools committed to the highest level of intercollegiate competition. This level was once called the University Division of the NCAA, in contrast to the lower level College Division; these terms were replaced with numeric divisions in 1973
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Provost (education)
A provost is the senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States
United States
and Canada, the equivalent of a pro-vice-chancellor at some institutions in the United Kingdom and Ireland, or a Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) at most Australian universities. Additionally, the heads of certain colleges in the UK and Ireland are called provosts; it is, in this sense, the equivalent of a master (or various other titles for the head of the college) at other colleges.Contents1 Duties, role, titles, and selection 2 Other titles a
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Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia
District of Columbia
and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.[4] Founded after the American Revolution
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University President
A chancellor is a leader of a college or university, usually either the executive or ceremonial head of the university or of a university campus. In most Commonwealth and former Commonwealth nations, the chancellor is usually a ceremonial non-resident head of the university. In such institutions, the chief executive of a university is the vice-chancellor, who may carry an additional title, such as "president & vice-chancellor". The chancellor may serve as chairman of the governing body; if not, this duty is often held by a chairman who may be known as a pro-chancellor. In many countries, the administrative and educational head of the university is known as the president, principal or rector. In the United States, the head of a university is most commonly a university president. In U.S
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San Francisco
 CaliforniaCSA San Jose–San Francisco–OaklandMetro San Francisco–Oakland–HaywardMission June 29, 1776[1]Incorporated April 15, 1850[2]Founded by José Joaquín Moraga Francisco PalóuNamed for St
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Chairman
The chairman (also chairperson, chairwoman or chair) is the highest officer of an organized group such as a board, a committee, or a deliberative assembly. The person holding the office is typically elected or appointed by the members of the group. The chairman presides over meetings of the assembled group and conducts its business in an orderly fashion.[1] When the group is not in session, the officer's duties often include acting as its head, its representative to the outside world and its spokesperson
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Pulitzer Prize
The Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
/ˈpʊlɪtsər/[1] is an award for achievements in newspaper, magazine and online journalism, literature, and musical composition in the United States. It was established in 1917 by provisions in the will of American (Hungarian-born) Joseph Pulitzer who had made his fortune as a newspaper publisher, and is administered by Columbia University
Columbia University
in New York City.[2] Prizes are awarded yearly in twenty-one categories. In twenty of the categories, each winner receives a certificate and a U.S
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Athletic Nickname
The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States
United States
is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. Typically as a matter of engendering school spirit, the institution either officially or unofficially uses this moniker of the institution's athletic teams also as a nickname to refer to people associated with the institution, especially its current students, but also often its alumni, its faculty, and its administration as well. This practice at the university and college tertiary higher-education level has proven so popular that it extended to the high school secondary-education level in the United States
United States
and in recent years even to the primary-education level as well
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