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Lubuskie
Lubusz Voivodeship, or Lubusz Province[1] (in Polish, województwo lubuskie [vɔjɛˈvut͡stfɔ luˈbuskʲɛ]), is a voivodeship (province) in western Poland. It was created on January 1, 1999, out of the former Gorzów Wielkopolski and Zielona Góra
Zielona Góra
Voivodeships, pursuant to the Polish local government reforms adopted in 1998. The province's name recalls the historic Lubusz Land[2] ( Lebus
Lebus
or Lubus), although parts of the voivodeship belong to the historic regions of Silesia, Greater Poland and Lusatia. Until 1945, it mainly formed the Neumark
Neumark
within the Prussian Province of Brandenburg. The functions of regional capital are shared between two cities: Gorzów Wielkopolski
Gorzów Wielkopolski
and Zielona Góra
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Voivodeships Of Poland
A województwo ([vɔjɛˈvut͡stfɔ]; plural: województwa) is the highest-level administrative subdivision of Poland, corresponding to a "province" in many other countries. The term "województwo" has been in use since the 14th century, and is commonly translated in English as "province".[1] Województwo is also rendered in English by "voivodeship" (/ˈvɔɪvoʊdʃɪp/) or a variant spelling.[2] The Polish local government reforms
Polish local government reforms
adopted in 1998, which went into effect on 1 January 1999, created sixteen new voivodeships. These replaced the 49 former voivodeships that had existed from 1 July 1975, and bear greater resemblance (in territory but not in name) to the voivodeships that existed between 1950 and 1975. Today's voivodeships are mostly named after historical and geographical regions, while those prior to 1998 generally took their names from the cities on which they were centered
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Brandenburg
Brandenburg
Brandenburg
(German pronunciation: [ˈbʁandn̩bʊɐ̯k] ( listen); Low German: Brannenborg, Lower Sorbian: Bramborska, Upper Sorbian: Braniborsko) is one of the sixteen federated states of Germany. It lies in the northeast of the country covering an area of 29,478 square kilometers and has 2.48 million inhabitants. The capital and largest city is Potsdam. Brandenburg
Brandenburg
surrounds but does not include the national capital and city-state Berlin
Berlin
forming a metropolitan area. Originating in the medieval Northern March, the Margraviate of Brandenburg
Brandenburg
grew to become the core of the Kingdom of Prussia, which would later become the Free State of Prussia
Free State of Prussia
with part being the province of Brandenburg
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Greater Poland
Greater Poland, often known by its Polish name Wielkopolska ([vʲɛlkɔˈpɔlska] ( listen)) (German: Großpolen; Latin: Polonia Maior), is a historical region of west-central Poland. Its chief city is Poznań. The boundaries of Greater Poland
Poland
have varied somewhat throughout history. Since the Middle Ages, the proper (właściwa) or exact/strict (ścisła) Wielkopolska (often referred to as ziemia, meaning "land") included the Poznań
Poznań
and Kalisz
Kalisz
voivodeships. In the wider sense (as dzielnica, i.e. region), it encompassed also Sieradz, Łęczyca, Brześć Kujawski and Inowrocław
Inowrocław
voivodeships (more eastward). One another meaning (as province) included also Mazovia
Mazovia
and Royal Prussia. After the Partitions of Poland, Greater Poland
Poland
was often identified with the Grand Duchy of Posen
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Lusatia
Lusatia
Lusatia
(German: Lausitz, Upper Sorbian: Łužica, Lower Sorbian: Łužyca, Polish: Łużyce, Czech: Lužice) is a region in Central Europe. The region is the home of the ethnic group of Lusatian Sorbs, a small Western Slavic
Western Slavic
nation. It stretches from the Bóbr
Bóbr
and Kwisa rivers in the east to the Pulsnitz and Black Elster
Black Elster
in the west, today located within the German states of Saxony
Saxony
and Brandenburg
Brandenburg
as well as in the Lower Silesian and Lubusz voivodeships of western Poland. Historically, Lusatia
Lusatia
belonged to several different countries
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Province Of Brandenburg
The Province of Brandenburg
Brandenburg
(German: Provinz Brandenburg) was a province of the Kingdom of Prussia
Prussia
and the Free State of Prussia
Prussia
from 1815 to 1945, from 1871 within the German Reich
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Voivode
Voivode[1] (/ˈvɔɪˌvoʊd/) (Old Slavic, literally "war-leader" or "war-lord") is an Eastern European title that originally denoted the principal commander of a military force. It derives from the word vojevoda, which in early Slavic meant the bellidux, i.e. the military commander of an area, but it usually had a greater meaning. In Byzantine
Byzantine
times it referred to mainly military commanders of Slavic populations, especially in the Balkans. The title voevodas (Greek: βοεβόδας) was first used in the work of the 10th-century Byzantine
Byzantine
emperor Constantine VII Porphyrogennetos
Constantine VII Porphyrogennetos
De Administrando Imperio to identify Hungarian military leaders.[2] In medieval Serbia
Serbia
it meant a high-ranking official and - before the Ottoman conquest in the 15th century - the commander of a military area
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Voivodeship Sejmik
A voivodeship /ˈvɔɪˌvoʊdˌʃɪp/ is the area administered by a voivode (Governor) in several countries of central and eastern Europe. Voivodeships have existed since medieval times in Poland, Hungary, Lithuania, Latvia, Ukraine, Russia
Russia
and Serbia. The administrative level of area (territory) of voivodeship resembles that of a duchy in western medieval states, much as the title of voivode was equivalent to that of a duke. Other roughly equivalent titles and areas in medieval Eastern Europe
Eastern Europe
included ban (bojan, vojin or bayan) and banate. In a modern context, the word normally refers to one of the provinces (województwa) of Poland
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West Pomeranian Voivodeship
West Pomeranian Voivodeship
Pomeranian Voivodeship
or West Pomerania
Pomerania
Province[1] (in Polish, województwo zachodniopomorskie [vɔjɛˈvut͡stfɔ zaˈxɔdɲɔ pɔˈmɔrskʲɛ]), is a voivodeship (province) in northwestern Poland. It borders on Pomeranian Voivodeship
Pomeranian Voivodeship
to the east, Greater Poland
Poland
Voivodeship to the southeast, Lubusz Voivodeship
Lubusz Voivodeship
to the south, the German federal-states of Mecklenburg-West Pomerania
Pomerania
and Brandenburg
Brandenburg
to the west, and the Baltic Sea
Baltic Sea
to the north
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Greater Poland Voivodeship
Greater Poland
Greater Poland
Voivodeship
Voivodeship
(in Polish: Województwo Wielkopolskie [vɔjɛˈvut͡stfɔ vjɛlkɔˈpɔlskʲɛ]), also known as Wielkopolska Voivodeship, Wielkopolska Province,[1] or Greater Poland Province, is a voivodeship, or province, in west-central Poland. It was created on 1 January 1999 out of the former Poznań, Kalisz, Konin, Piła
Piła
and Leszno
Leszno
Voivodeships, pursuant to the Polish local government reforms adopted in 1998. The province is named after the region called Greater Poland
Greater Poland
or Wielkopolska [vjɛlkɔˈpɔlska] ( listen)
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Lower Silesian Voivodeship
Lower Silesian Voivodeship, or Lower Silesia
Lower Silesia
Province[1] (Polish: województwo dolnośląskie [vɔjɛˈvut͡stfɔ dɔlnɔˈɕlɔ̃skʲɛ]), in southwestern Poland, is one of the 16 voivodeships (provinces) into which Poland
Poland
is divided. Lower Silesia
Lower Silesia
was part of Medieval Poland
Poland
during the Piast dynasty. After the testament of Bolesław III Wrymouth in 1138, Poland
Poland
entered a period of fragmentation. Silesia
Silesia
became a province of Poland
Poland
as a duchy, which later on became divided into many small duchies reigned by dukes and princes of the Piast dynasty. During this time, cultural and ethnic Germanic influence prospered due to immigrants from the German-speaking areas of the Holy Roman Empire. This also impacted on the local architecture as well as traditions and cuisine
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Germany
Coordinates: 51°N 9°E / 51°N 9°E / 51; 9Federal Republic
Republic
of Germany Bundesrepublik Deutschland (German)[a]FlagCoat of armsMotto:  "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit" (de facto) "Unity and Justice and Freedom"Anthem: "Deutschlandlied" (third verse only)[b] "Song of Germany"Location of  Germany  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Location of
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Saxony
The Free State of Saxony[4] (German: Freistaat Sachsen [ˈfʁaɪ̯ʃtaːt ˈzaksn̩]; Upper Sorbian: Swobodny stat Sakska) is a landlocked federal state of Germany, bordering the federal states of Brandenburg, Saxony
Saxony
Anhalt, Thuringia, and Bavaria, as well as the countries of Poland
Poland
(Lower Silesian and Lubusz Voivodeships) and the Czech Republic
Czech Republic
(Karlovy Vary, Liberec and Ústí nad Labem Regions). Its capital is Dresden, and its largest city is Leipzig. Saxony
Saxony
is the tenth largest of Germany's sixteen states, with an area of 18,413 square kilometres (7,109 sq mi), and the sixth most populous, with 4 million people. The history of the state of Saxony
Saxony
spans more than a millennium
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Lebus
Lebus
Lebus
(Polish: Lubusz) is a historic town in the Märkisch-Oderland District of Brandenburg, Germany. It is the administrative seat of Amt ("municipal federation") Lebus
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Mieszko I
Mieszko I ( Polish (help·info); c. 930 – 25 May 992)[1] was the ruler of the Polans[2] from about 960 until his death. A member of the Piast dynasty, he was a son of the legendary Siemomysł, and a grandson of Lestek. He was the father of Bolesław I the Brave (the first crowned king of Poland) and of Gunhild of Wenden.[3] Most sources make Mieszko I the father of Sigrid the Haughty, a Nordic queen, though one source identifies her father as Skoglar Toste, and the grandfather of Canute the Great
Canute the Great
(Gundhild's son), and the great-grandfather of Gunhilda of Denmark, Canute the Great's daughter and wife of Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor. The first Christian
Christian
ruler of territories later called Poland, Mieszko I is considered the creator of the Polish state
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Boleslaus I Of Poland
Bolesław I the Brave
Bolesław I the Brave
(Polish: Bolesław I Chrobry  Polish (help·info), Czech: Boleslav Chrabrý; 967 – 17 June 1025), less often known as Bolesław I the Great (Polish: Bolesław I Wielki), was Duke of Poland
Duke of Poland
from 992 to 1025, and the first King of Poland
King of Poland
in 1025. As Boleslav IV, he was also Duke of Bohemia
Bohemia
between 1002 and 1003. He was the son of Mieszko I of Poland by his wife, Dobrawa
Dobrawa
of Bohemia. According to a scholarly theory, Bolesław ruled Lesser Poland
Lesser Poland
already during the last years of his father's reign
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