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Lake Argyle
Lake Argyle
Lake Argyle
is Western Australia's largest and Australia's second largest[2] freshwater man-made reservoir by volume. The reservoir is part of the Ord River
Ord River
Irrigation Scheme and is located near the East Kimberley town of Kununurra. The lake flooded large parts of the Shire of Wyndham-East Kimberley on the Kimberley Plateau about 80 kilometres (50 mi) inland from the Joseph Bonaparte Gulf, close to the border with the Northern Territory. The primary inflow is the Ord River, while the Bow River and many other smaller creeks also flow into the dam. The lake is a DIWA-listed wetland.[3] as it is the largest lake in northern Australia
Australia
and an excellent example of a man-made lake
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Argyle Lake State Park
Argyle Lake State Park is an Illinois state park located in Colchester, Illinois. The 1,700-acre (688 ha) park is home to the 93-acre (38 ha) Argyle Lake and 5 miles (8 km) of hiking trails and wooded campsites. The land for the state park was purchased by the state in 1948 from local farmers. Argyle Lake, an artificial lake, was later created by damming a nearby water source. The area now occupied by the lake was once the home of "Argyle Hollow," part of the 19th century stagecoach route between Galena and Beardstown. The region was a source of coal, clay and limestone. While many of the brick works, clay and pottery operations have since closed, some limestone quarries in the area are still in operation today. There have been numerous Bigfoot sightings at the lake in recent years.[1] References[edit]^ "Daylight sighting by a camper in Argyle Lake State Park". Bigfoot Field Research Organization. Retrieved 12 May 2017. "Argyle Lake - State Park"
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BirdLife International
BirdLife International (formerly the International Council for Bird Preservation) is a global partnership of conservation organisations that strives to conserve birds, their habitats and global biodiversity, working with people towards sustainability in the use of natural resources. It is the world's largest partnership of conservation organisations, with over 120 partner organisations.[1] It has a membership of more than 2.5 million people and partner organizations in more than 100 countries. Major partners include Britain’s Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, the Wild Bird Society of Japan, and the U.S. National Audubon Society. The group’s headquarters are located in Cambridge, UK. BirdLife International’s priorities include preventing extinction of bird species, identifying and safeguarding important sites for birds, maintaining and restoring key bird habitats, and empowering conservationists worldwide
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Archer Fish
The archerfish (spinner fish or archer fish) form a monotypic family, Toxotidae, of fish known for their habit of preying on land-based insects and other small animals by shooting them down with water droplets from their specialized mouths. The family is small, consisting of seven species in a single genus Toxotes. The seven species typically inhabit brackish waters of estuaries and mangroves, but can also be found in the open ocean, as well as far upstream in fresh water.[1] They can be found from India and Sri Lanka, through Southeast Asia, to Northern Australia
Northern Australia
and Melanesia.[2] Archerfish
Archerfish
or spinnerfish bodies are deep and laterally compressed, with the dorsal fin, and the profile a straight line from dorsal fin to mouth. The mouth is protractile, and the lower jaw juts out. Sizes are fairly small, typically up to about 12–18 cm (5–7 in), but T
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Mouth Almighty
The mouth almighty (Glossamia aprion) is a type of cardinalfish (Apogonidae). It is a freshwater fish native to Australia and New Guinea.[1] References[edit]^ [1]External links[edit]mouth Almighty video on Youtube Fishes of Australia : Glossamia aprionTaxon identifiersWd: Q5760098 EoL: 206475 FishBase: 14863 GBIF: 2397575 iNaturalist: 202144 ITIS: 168343 NCBI: 638236 WoRMS: 991218This Perciformes article is a stub
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Long Tom (fish)
Ablennes Belone Belonion Petalichthys Platybelone Potamorrhaphis Pseudotylosurus Strongylura Tylosurus XenentodonNeedlefish (family Belonidae) or long toms[1] are piscivorous fishes primarily associated with very shallow marine habitats or the surface of the open sea. Some genera include species found in marine, brackish, and freshwater environments (e.g., Strongylura), while a few genera are confined to freshwater rivers and streams, including Belonion, Potamorrhaphis, and Xenentodon.[2] Needlefish closely resemble North American freshwater gars (family Lepisosteidae) in being elongated and having long, narrow jaws filled with sharp teeth, and some species of needlefishes are referred to as gars or garfish despite being only distantly related to the true gars
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Bony Bream
Fluvialosa richardsoni Bony bream Nematalosa erebi are a widespread and common, small to medium-sized Australian freshwater fish often found in large shoals throughout much of northern and central Australia, and the Murray-Darling basin.Contents1 Description 2 Distribution 3 Habitat 4 Diet 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit] A deep bodied, laterally compressed fish with a blunt snout.[1][2] Spineless dorsal fin with the posterior ray developedinto a long filament.[1] Usually silver overall, sometimes grey to greenish dorsally.[1] In Victoria it has been reported to develop a rusty red tinge especially around the mouth[2] which is thought to be related to breeding.[1] Some popul
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Sleepy Cod
The sleepy cod ( Oxyeleotris
Oxyeleotris
lineolata) is a medium-sized sleeper goby, native to tropical fresh waters of northern Australia
Australia
and questionably from New Guinea. It is a member of the order Perciformes, thus is unrelated to the true cods in the order Gadiformes
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Saltwater Crocodile
The saltwater crocodile ( Crocodylus
Crocodylus
porosus), also known as the estuarine crocodile, Indo-Pacific crocodile, marine crocodile, sea crocodile or informally as saltie,[2] is the largest of all living reptiles, as well as the largest riparian predator in the world
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Cane Toad (Australia)
The cane toad in Australia is regarded as an exemplary case of a "feral species"—others being rabbits, foxes, cats and dogs. Australia's relative isolation prior to European colonisation and the industrial revolution—both of which dramatically increased traffic and importation of novel species—allowed development of a complex, interdepending system of ecology, but one which provided no natural predators for many of the species subsequently introduced
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Mudflat
Mudflats or mud flats, also known as tidal flats, are coastal wetlands that form when mud is deposited by tides or rivers. They are found in sheltered areas such as bays, bayous, lagoons, and estuaries. Mudflats may be viewed geologically as exposed layers of bay mud, resulting from deposition of estuarine silts, clays and marine animal detritus. Most of the sediment within a mudflat is within the intertidal zone, and thus the flat is submerged and exposed approximately twice daily. In the past tidal flats were considered unhealthy, economically unimportant areas and were often dredged and developed into agricultural land.[1] Several especially shallow mudflat areas, such as the Wadden Sea, are now popular among those practising the sport of mudflat hiking. On the Baltic Sea
Baltic Sea
coast of Germany
Germany
in places, mudflats are exposed not by tidal action, but by wind-action driving water away from the shallows into the sea
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Grassland
Grasslands are areas where the vegetation is dominated by grasses (Poaceae); however, sedge (Cyperaceae) and rush (Juncaceae) families can also be found along with variable proportions of legumes, like clover, and other herbs. Grasslands occur naturally on all continents except Antarctica. Grasslands are found in most ecoregions of the Earth
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Important Bird Area
An Important Bird and Biodiversity
Biodiversity
Area (IBA) is an area identified using an internationally agreed set of criteria as being globally important for the conservation of bird populations. IBA was developed and sites are identified by BirdLife International. Currently there are over 12,000 IBAs worldwide.[1] These sites are small enough to be entirely conserved and differ in their character, habitat or ornithological importance from the surrounding habitat. In the United States the Program is administered by the National Audubon Society.[2] Often IBAs form part of a country's existing protected area network, and so are protected under national legislation. Legal recognition and protection of IBAs that are not within existing protected areas varies within different countries
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Barramundi
The barramundi or Asian sea bass ( Lates
Lates
calcarifer) is a species of catadromous fish in family Latidae
Latidae
of order Perciformes. The species is widely distributed in the Indo-West Pacific
Indo-West Pacific
region from Southeast Asia to Papua New Guinea
Papua New Guinea
and Northern Australia
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Waterbird
The term water bird, waterbird or aquatic bird (not to be confused with wading birds) is used to refer to birds that live on or around water. Some definitions apply the term especially to birds in freshwater habitats, though others make no distinction from birds that inhabit marine environments. In addition, some water birds are more terrestrial or aquatic than others, and their adaptations will vary depending on their environment. These adaptations include webbed feet, bills and legs adapted to feed in water, and the ability to dive from the surface or the air to catch prey in water.Play mediaVideo from Danube river in Vienna (2014)The term aquatic bird is sometimes also used in this context. A related term that has a narrower meaning is waterfowl. Some birds of prey, such as ospreys and sea eagles, take prey from water but are not considered water birds
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Australian Bustard
The Australian bustard
Australian bustard
( Ardeotis
Ardeotis
australis) is a large ground bird inhabiting grassland, woodland and open agricultural country across northern Australia
Australia
and southern New Guinea. It is also commonly referred to as the plains turkey,[2] and in Central Australia
Australia
as bush turkey,[3] particularly by Aboriginal people, though this name may also be used for the Australian brushturkey
Australian brushturkey
as well as the orange-footed scrubfowl.Contents1 Description 2 Conservation status2.1 Victoria3 Aborigines and bush turkeys 4 Other 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit]Mount Carbine, AustraliaMale in mating displayThe male is up to 1.2 m (47 in) tall with a 2.3 m (7.5 ft) wingspan
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