HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

KC-135
The Boeing
Boeing
KC-135 Stratotanker is a military aerial refueling aircraft. Both the KC-135 and the Boeing
Boeing
707 airliner were developed from the Boeing
Boeing
367-80 prototype. It is the predominant variant of the C-135 Stratolifter family of transport aircraft. The KC-135 was the US Air Force's first jet-powered refueling tanker and replaced the KC-97 Stratofreighter. The KC-135 was initially tasked with refueling strategic bombers, but was used extensively in the Vietnam War
Vietnam War
and later conflicts such as Operation Desert Storm
Operation Desert Storm
to extend the range and endurance of US tactical fighters and bombers. The KC-135 entered service with the United States Air Force
United States Air Force
(USAF) in 1957; it is one of six military fixed-wing aircraft with over 50 years of continuous service[1] with its original operator
[...More...]

"KC-135" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Harold E. Talbott
Harold Elstner Talbott, Jr. (March 31, 1888 – March 2, 1957) was the third United States Secretary of the Air Force.Contents1 Biography1.1 Family 1.2 Career2 References 3 External linksBiography[edit] He was born in Dayton, Ohio, in March 1888[1] and died in 1957. He attended The Hill School
The Hill School
in Pottstown, Pennsylvania, and spent two years at Yale University
Yale University
before returning to his father's construction company in 1911. He was a well-known polo player.[citation needed] Family[edit] Talbott's father was a wealthy engineer who was involved in the construction of the Soo Locks
Soo Locks
on Lake Superior
Lake Superior
and had various railroad and paper milling interests.[2] Talbott Sr. was the first mayor of Oakwood, Ohio. He was also involved in the recovery of Dayton from the 1913 flood
[...More...]

"Harold E. Talbott" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dihedral (aircraft)
Dihedral angle
Dihedral angle
is the upward angle from horizontal of the wings or tailplane of a fixed-wing aircraft. "Anhedral angle" is the name given to negative dihedral angle, that is, when there is a downward angle from horizontal of the wings or tailplane of a fixed-wing aircraft.Schematic of dihedral and anhedral angle of an aircraft wing Dihedral angle
Dihedral angle
(or anhedral angle) has a strong influence on dihedral effect, which is named after it. Dihedral effect is the amount of roll moment produced per degree (or radian) of sideslip. Dihedral effect is a critical factor in the stability of an aircraft about the roll axis (the spiral mode). It is also pertinent to the nature of an aircraft's Dutch roll
Dutch roll
oscillation and to maneuverability about the roll axis.Measuring the dihedral angleLongitudinal dihedral is a comparatively obscure term related to the pitch axis of an airplane
[...More...]

"Dihedral (aircraft)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

California
Native languages as of 2007English 57.4%[2] Spanish 28.5%[3] Chinese 2.8%[3] Filipino 2.2%[3]Demonym CalifornianCapital SacramentoLargest city Los AngelesLargest metro Greater Los Angeles
Los Angeles
AreaArea Ranked 3rd • Total 163,696 sq mi (423,970 km2) • Width 250 miles (400 km) • Length 770 miles (1,240 km) • % water 4.7 • Latitude 32°32′ N to 42° N • Longitude 114°8′ W to 124°26′ W
[...More...]

"California" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Operation Desert Storm
Coalition victoryIraqi forces expelled from Kuwait Kuwaiti monarchy restored Destruction of Iraqi and Kuwaiti infrastructure Failed Shia/Kurdish uprisings against the Iraqi government Saddam Hussein
Saddam Hussein
regime of the Iraqi Baathist government retains power in Iraq UN sanctions against Iraq United Nations Security Council Resolution 687
[...More...]

"Operation Desert Storm" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vietnam War
North Vietnamese victoryWithdrawal of American-led forces from Indochina Communist governments take power in South Vietnam, Cambodia
Cambodia
and Laos South Vietnam
South Vietnam
is annexed
[...More...]

"Vietnam War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Empennage
The empennage (/ˌɑːmpɪˈnɑːʒ/ or /ˈɛmpɪnɪdʒ/), also known as the tail or tail assembly, is a structure at the rear of an aircraft that provides stability during flight, in a way similar to the feathers on an arrow.[1][2][3] The term derives from the French language word empenner which means "to feather an arrow".[4] Most aircraft feature an empennage incorporating vertical and horizontal stabilising surfaces which stabilise the flight dynamics of yaw and pitch,[1][2] as well as housing control surfaces. In spite of effective control surfaces, many early aircraft that lacked a stabilising empennage were virtually unflyable. Even so-called "tailless aircraft" usually have a tail fin (usually a vertical stabiliser)
[...More...]

"Empennage" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Horizontal Stabilizer
A tailplane, also known as a horizontal stabiliser, is a small lifting surface located on the tail (empennage) behind the main lifting surfaces of a fixed-wing aircraft as well as other non-fixed-wing aircraft such as helicopters and gyroplanes. Not all fixed-wing aircraft have tailplanes. Canards, tailless and flying wing aircraft have no separate tailplane, while in v-tail aircraft the vertical stabilizer, rudder, and the tail-plane and elevator are combined to form two diagonal surfaces in a V layout. The function of the tailplane is to provide stability and control
[...More...]

"Horizontal Stabilizer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Airliner
An airliner is a type of aircraft for transporting passengers and air cargo. Such aircraft are most often operated by airlines. Although the definition of an airliner can vary from country to country, an airliner is typically defined as an aircraft intended for carrying multiple passengers or cargo in commercial service. The largest airliners are wide-body jets. These aircraft are frequently called twin-aisle aircraft because they generally have two separate aisles running from the front to the back of the passenger cabin. These aircraft are usually used for long-haul flights between airline hubs and major cities with many passengers. A smaller, more common class of airliners is the narrow-body or single aisle aircraft. These smaller airliners are generally used for short to medium-distance flights with fewer passengers than their wide-body counterparts. Regional airliners typically seat fewer than 100 passengers and may be powered by turbofans or turboprops
[...More...]

"Airliner" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vertical Stabilizer
The vertical stabilizers, vertical stabilisers, or fins, of aircraft, missiles or bombs are typically found on the aft end of the fuselage or body, and are intended to reduce aerodynamic side slip and provide direction stability. It is analogous to a skeg on boats and ships. On aircraft, vertical stabilizers generally point upwards. These are also known as the vertical tail, and are part of an aircraft's empennage. This upright mounting position has two major benefits: The drag of the stabilizer increases at speed, which creates a nose-up moment that helps to slow down the aircraft that prevent dangerous overspeed, and when the aircraft banks, the stabilizer produces lift which counters the banking moment and keeps the aircraft upright at the absence of control input. If the vertical stabilizer was mounted on the underside, it would produce a positive feedback whenever the aircraft dove or banked, which is inherently unstable
[...More...]

"Vertical Stabilizer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Reconnaissance
Reconnaissance
Reconnaissance
(US Army FM 7-92; Chap. 4)In military operations, reconnaissance or scouting is the exploration outside an area occupied by friendly forces to gain information about natural features and enemy presence. Examples of reconnaissance include patrolling by troops (skirmishers, Long Range Reconnaissance
Reconnaissance
Patrol, U.S. Army Rangers, cavalry scouts, or military intelligence specialists), ships or submarines, manned/unmanned reconnaissance aircraft, satellites, or by setting up covert observation posts
[...More...]

"Reconnaissance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cold War
The Cold War
Cold War
was a state of geopolitical tension after World War II between powers in the Eastern Bloc
Eastern Bloc
(the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and its satellite states) and powers in the Western Bloc
Western Bloc
(the United States, its NATO allies and others). Historians do not fully agree on the dates, but a common timeframe is the period between 1947, the year the Truman Doctrine, a U.S. foreign policy pledging to aid nations threatened by Soviet expansionism, was announced, and either 1989, when communism fell in Eastern Europe, or 1991, when the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
collapsed
[...More...]

"Cold War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fiscal Year
A fiscal year (or financial year, or sometimes budget year) is the period used by governments for accounting and budget purposes, which vary between countries. It is also used for financial reporting by business and other organizations. Laws in many jurisdictions require company financial reports to be prepared and published on an annual basis, but generally do not require the reporting period to align with the calendar year (1 January to 31 December). Taxation laws generally require accounting records to be maintained and taxes calculated on an annual basis, which usually corresponds to the fiscal year used for government purposes. The calculation of tax on an annual basis is especially relevant for direct taxaction, such as income tax. Many annual government fees—such as Council rates, licence fees, etc.—are also levied on a fiscal year basis, while others are charged on an anniversary basis. The "fiscal year end" (FYE) is the date that marks the end of the fiscal year
[...More...]

"Fiscal Year" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United States Dollar
 United States  East Timor[2][Note 1]  Ecuador[3][Note 2]  El Salvador[4]  Federated States of Micronesia  Marshall Islands  Palau  Panama[Note 3]  Zimbabwe[Note 4]3 non-U.S
[...More...]

"United States Dollar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Turbojet
The turbojet is an airbreathing jet engine, typically used in aircraft. It consists of a gas turbine with a propelling nozzle. The gas turbine has an air inlet, a compressor, a combustion chamber, and a turbine (that drives the compressor). The compressed air from the compressor is heated by the fuel in the combustion chamber and then allowed to expand through the turbine. The turbine exhaust is then expanded in the propelling nozzle where it is accelerated to high speed to provide thrust.[1] Two engineers, Frank Whittle
Frank Whittle
in the United Kingdom and Hans von Ohain
Hans von Ohain
in Germany, developed the concept independently into practical engines during the late 1930s. Turbojets have been replaced in slower aircraft by turboprops because they have better range-specific fuel consumption. At medium speeds, where the propeller is no longer efficient, turboprops have been replaced by turbofans
[...More...]

"Turbojet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.