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Juan Caramuel Y Lobkowitz
Juan Caramuel y Lobkowitz
Juan Caramuel y Lobkowitz
(Juan Caramuel de Lobkowitz, May 23, 1606 in Madrid
Madrid
— September 7 or 8, 1682 in Vigevano) was a Spanish Catholic scholastic philosopher, ecclesiastic, mathematician and writer.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Printed Works 4 Note 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksLife[edit] He was a precocious child, early delving into serious problems in mathematics and even publishing astronomical tables in his tenth year. After receiving a superficial education at college, where his unusual ability brought rapid advancement, this prodigy turned his attention to the Asiatic languages, especially Chinese
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University Of St Andrews
University
University
of St Andrews                                 St Mary's College                                       School of Medicine                                 St Leonard's College                                 
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Combinatorics
Combinatorics
Combinatorics
is an area of mathematics primarily concerned with counting, both as a means and an end in obtaining results, and certain properties of finite structures. It is closely related to many other areas of mathematics and has many applications ranging from logic to statistical physics, from evolutionary biology to computer science, etc. To fully understand the scope of combinatorics requires a great deal of further amplification, the details of which are not universally agreed upon.[1] According to H. J
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Archbishop Of Prague
The following is a list of bishops and archbishops of Prague. The bishopric of Prague was established in 973, and elevated to an archbishopric on 30 April 1344. The current Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
Archdiocese of Prague is the continual successor of the bishopric established in 973 (with a 140-year sede vacante in the Hussite
Hussite
era). In addition, the city also has an Orthodox archeparchy (archbishopric), Greek Catholic exarchate and the Prague diocese and patriarchate of the Czechoslovak Hussite
Hussite
Church seat in Prague.An aerial view of St. Vitus Cathedral
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Yeoman
A yeoman /ˈjoʊmən/ was a member of a social class in late medieval to early modern England. In early recorded uses, a yeoman was an attendant in a noble household; hence titles such as " Yeoman
Yeoman
of the Chamber", " Yeoman
Yeoman
of the Crown", " Yeoman
Yeoman
Usher", "King's Yeoman", Yeomen Warders, Yeomen of the Guard. The later sense of yeoman as "a commoner who cultivates his own land" is recorded from the 15th century; in military context, yeoman was the rank of the third order of "fighting men", below knights and squires, but above knaves. A specialized meaning in naval terminology, "petty officer in charge of supplies", arose in the 1660s.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 United States3.1 U.S. Navy
U.S. Navy
and U.S. Coast Guard4 Other references4.1 In popular culture 4.2 Other5 See also 6 Notes 7 Further reading 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The term is first recorded c
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Jean-Noël Paquot
Jean-Noël Paquot (1722–1803) was a Belgian theologian, historian, Hebrew
Hebrew
scholar and bibliographer. Life[edit] Paquot was born in Florennes
Florennes
in 1722. In 1738 he enrolled at the University of Louvain, graduating Licentiate of Theology in 1751.[1] From 1755 to 1771 he taught Hebrew
Hebrew
at the Collegium Trilingue
Collegium Trilingue
in Leuven, where he was also librarian. He was stripped of his position after a criminal trial. In subsequent years he lived in Brussels
Brussels
and Gembloux
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Leuven
Leuven
Leuven
(Dutch: [ˈløːvə(n)] ( listen)) or Louvain (French: Louvain, pronounced [luvɛ̃]; German: Löwen) is the capital of the province of Flemish Brabant
Flemish Brabant
in Belgium. It is located about 25 kilometres (16 miles) east of Brussels. The municipality itself comprises the historic city and the former neighbouring municipalities of Heverlee, Kessel-Lo, a part of Korbeek-Lo, Wilsele and Wijgmaal
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Blaise Pascal
Blaise Pascal
Blaise Pascal
(/pæˈskæl, pɑːˈskɑːl/;[3] French: [blɛz paskal]; 19 June 1623 – 19 August 1662) was a French mathematician, physicist, inventor, writer and Catholic theologian. He was a child prodigy who was educated by his father, a tax collector in Rouen. Pascal's earliest work was in the natural and applied sciences where he made important contributions to the study of fluids, and clarified the concepts of pressure and vacuum by generalising the work of Evangelista Torricelli. Pascal also wrote in defence of the scientific method. In 1642, while still a teenager, he started some pioneering work on calculating machines
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Lettres Provinciales
The Lettres provinciales (Provincial letters) are a series of eighteen letters written by French philosopher and theologian Blaise Pascal under the pseudonym Louis de Montalte. Written in the midst of the formulary controversy between the Jansenists and the Jesuits, they are a defense of the Jansenist
Jansenist
Antoine Arnauld
Antoine Arnauld
from Port-Royal-des-Champs, a friend of Pascal who in 1656 was condemned by the Faculté de Théologie at the Sorbonne in Paris
Paris
for views that were claimed to be heretical. The First letter is dated January 23, 1656 and the Eighteenth March 24, 1657.[1] A fragmentary Nineteenth letter is frequently included with the other eighteen. In these letters, Pascal humorously attacked casuistry, a rhetorical method often used by Jesuit
Jesuit
theologians, and accused Jesuits of moral laxity
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Alphonsus Liguori
Saint Alphonsus Liguori
Alphonsus Liguori
CSsR (1696–1787), sometimes called Alphonsus Maria Liguori, was an Italian Catholic bishop, spiritual writer, composer, musician, artist, poet, lawyer, scholastic philosopher, and theologian. He founded the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer
Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer
(the Redemptorists). In 1762 he was appointed Bishop of Sant'Agata dei Goti. A prolific writer, he published nine editions of his Moral Theology
Theology
in his lifetime, in addition to other devotional and ascetic works and letters. Among his best known works are The Glories of Mary and The Way of the Cross, the latter still used in parishes during Lenten devotions. He was canonized in 1839 by Pope Gregory XVI
Pope Gregory XVI
and proclaimed a Doctor of the Church by Pope Pius IX
Pope Pius IX
in 1871
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Probability
Related concepts and fundamentals:Agnosticism Epistemology Presupposition Probabilityv t e Probability
Probability
is the measure of the likelihood that an event will occur.[1] See glossary of probability and statistics. Probability
Probability
is quantified as a number between 0 and 1, where, loosely speaking,[2] 0 indicates impossibility and 1 indicates certainty.[3][4] The higher the probability of an event, the more likely it is that the event will occur
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Benedictine Order
The Order of Saint Benedict
Order of Saint Benedict
(OSB; Latin: Ordo Sancti Benedicti), also known – in reference to the colour of its members' habits – as the Black Monks, is a Catholic religious order
Catholic religious order
of independent monastic communities that observe the Rule of Saint Benedict. Each community (monastery, priory or abbey) within the order maintains its own autonomy, while the order itself represents their mutual interests
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Huygens
Huygens (also Huijgens, Huigens, Huijgen/Huygen, or Huigen) is a Dutch patronymic surname, meaning "son of Hugo". Most references to "Huygens" are to the polymath Christiaan Huygens
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Logarithm
In mathematics, the logarithm is the inverse operation to exponentiation, just as division is the inverse of multiplication. That means the logarithm of a number is the exponent to which another fixed number, the base, must be raised to produce that number. In the most simple case the logarithm counts repeated multiplication of the same factor; e.g., since 1000 = 10 × 10 × 10 = 103, the "logarithm to base 10" of 1000 is 3. More generally, exponentiation allows any positive real number to be raised to any real power, always producing a positive result, so the logarithm can be calculated for any two positive real numbers b and x where b is not equal to 1. The logarithm of x to base b, denoted logb (x) (or logb x when no confusion is possible), is the unique real number y such that by = x. For example, log2 64 = 6, as 64 = 26. The logarithm to base 10 (that is b = 10) is called the common logarithm and has many applications in science and engineering
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Cologarithm
In mathematics, the base-b cologarithm,[1] sometimes shortened to colog,[1] of a number is the base-b logarithm of the reciprocal of the number. It is equal to the negative base-b logarithm of the number. colog b ⁡ ( x ) = log b ⁡ ( 1 x ) = log b ⁡ ( 1 ) − log b ⁡ ( x ) = − log b ⁡ ( x ) displaystyle operatorname colog _ b (x)=log _ b left( frac 1 x right)=log _ b (1)-log _ b (x)=-log _ b (x) [1]In chemistry, a decimal cologarithm is indicated by the letter p
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Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software created prior to 1974.[5]
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