HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Ishwar Chandra Vidyasagar
Ishwar Chandra Vidyasagar
Ishwar Chandra Vidyasagar
CIE (26 September 1820 – 29 July 1891), born Ishwar Chandra Bandyopadhyay (Ishshor Chôndro Bôndopaddhae; Bengali: ঈশ্বরচন্দ্র বন্দ্যোপাধ্যায়), was a British Indian Bengali polymath and a key figure of the Bengal
Bengal
Renaissance.[1][2] He was a philosopher, academic educator, writer, translator, printer, publisher, entrepreneur, reformer and philanthropist. His efforts to simplify and modernize Bengali prose were significant. He also rationalized and simplified the Bengali alphabet
Bengali alphabet
and type, which had remained unchanged since Charles Wilkins
Charles Wilkins
and Panchanan Karmakar
Panchanan Karmakar
had cut the first (wooden) Bengali type in 1780
[...More...]

"Ishwar Chandra Vidyasagar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Santhals
The Santal, or rarely Santals
Santals
(Santali:ᱥᱟᱱᱛᱟᱲ,Hindi: सांथाल, Bengali: সাঁওতাল, translit. shãotāl, Nepali: सतार/सन्थाल, translit. satār/santhāl), are an Adivasi
Adivasi
ethnic group, native to Nepal
Nepal
and the Indian states of Jharkhand, West Bengal, Bihar, Odisha, Assam
Assam
(part of the Tea Tribes). There is also a significant Santhal minority in neighboring Bangladesh, and a small population in Nepal. They are one of the largest tribal communities in India. The Santal
Santal
mostly speak Santali.Contents1 Santali language 2 Religions 3 Santali culture 4 Traditions of Santals 5 Notable people 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 External linksSantali language[edit] The Reverend J
[...More...]

"Santhals" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Kulin Brahmin
Kulin Brahmins are the Bengali Brahmins belonging to Hindu
Hindu
religion, who can trace themselves to the five families of Kannauj
Kannauj
who migrated to Bengal. The five families were of the five gotras (Shandilya, Bharadwaj, Kashyap, Vatsya and Saavarna)
[...More...]

"Kulin Brahmin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Abugida
An abugida /ˌɑːbʊˈɡiːdə/ (from Ge'ez: አቡጊዳ ’abugida), or alphasyllabary, is a segmental writing system in which consonant–vowel sequences are written as a unit: each unit is based on a consonant letter, and vowel notation is secondary. This contrasts with a full alphabet, in which vowels have status equal to consonants, and with an abjad, in which vowel marking is absent, partial, or optional
[...More...]

"Abugida" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jorashanko
Jorasanko
Jorasanko
is a neighbourhood of north Kolkata, in Kolkata
Kolkata
district, West Bengal, India. It is so called because of the two (jora) wooden or bamboo bridges (sanko) that spanned a small stream at this point.Contents1 History 2 Rabindra Sarani 3 Jorasanko
Jorasanko
Natyashala 4 Recent developments 5 Gegraphy5.1 Police district6 Gallery 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] Apart from the distinguished seat of the Tagore family, traditionally known as the Jorasanko
Jorasanko
Thakur Bari, it was also home of the Singhas (including Kaliprasanna Singha), the Pals (including Krishnadas Pal), and the families of Dewan Banarasi Ghosh,Gokul Chandra Daw, Narsingha Chandra Daw, Prafulla Chandra Gain, and Chandramohan Chatterji
[...More...]

"Jorashanko" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bengal Presidency
The Bengal
Bengal
Presidency was once the largest subdivision (presidency) of British India, with its seat in Calcutta
Calcutta
(now Kolkata). It was primarily centred in the Bengal
Bengal
region. At its territorial peak in the 19th century, the presidency extended from the present-day Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan
Pakistan
in the west to Burma, Singapore
Singapore
and Penang
Penang
in the east. The Governor of Bengal
Bengal
was concurrently the Viceroy of India
India
for many years. Most of the presidency's territories were eventually incorporated into other British Indian provinces and crown colonies
[...More...]

"Bengal Presidency" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Burrabazar
Burrabazar
Burrabazar
(also spelt Bara Bazar) is a neighbourhood of central Kolkata, earlier known as Calcutta, in Kolkata
Kolkata
district in the Indian state of West Bengal. Burrabazar
Burrabazar
expanded from a yarn and textile market into the commercial nucleus of Kolkata
Kolkata
and one of the largest wholesale markets in India.[1][2][3]Contents1 Etymology 2 History2.1 Sutanuti
Sutanuti
haat 2.2 Bazar Kolkata 2.3 Police section house3 Geography3.1 Location 3.2 Police district4 Economy 5 Administration5.1 Traffic 5.2 Unsafe buildings 5.3 Fire hazards6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEtymology[edit] Burrabazar
Burrabazar
(Hindi: बडा बजार) is a Hindi word meaning big market. In Bengali, it is called Barobazar, (Bengali: বড় বাজার), the meaning remaining same. However, there is another theory
[...More...]

"Burrabazar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Paschim Midnapore District
Paschim Medinipur district
Paschim Medinipur district
or West Midnapore
Midnapore
district (Pron: ˌmɪdnəˈpʊə) (also known as Midnapore
Midnapore
West) is one of the districts of the state of West Bengal, India. It was formed on 1 January 2002 after the Partition of Midnapore
Midnapore
into Paschim Medinipur and Purba Medinipur
[...More...]

"Paschim Midnapore District" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sanskrit Literature
Vedic and Sanskrit literature
Sanskrit literature
comprises the spoken or sung literature of the Vedas
Vedas
from the early-to-mid 2nd to mid 1st millennium BCE, and continues with the oral tradition of the Sanskrit epics
Sanskrit epics
of Iron Age India; the golden age of Classical Sanskrit literature
Sanskrit literature
dates to Late Antiquity (roughly the 3rd to 8th centuries CE). Indian literary production saw a late bloom in the 11th century before declining after 1100 CE, hastened by the Islamic conquest of India, due to the destruction of ancient seats of learning such as the universities at Taxila
Taxila
and Nalanda
[...More...]

"Sanskrit Literature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Brahmin
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


[...More...]
"Brahmin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hindu
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


[...More...]
"Hindu" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Howrah
Howrah
Howrah
or Haora (/ˈhaʊrə/) is an industrial city in West Bengal, India, that has developed into an urban agglomeration, alongside its twin city Kolkata, as the Kolkata
Kolkata
metropolitan area. Howrah
Howrah
is located on the west bank of the Hooghly River, and is the headquarters of the district, and of the Howrah Sadar subdivision
Howrah Sadar subdivision
of the district
[...More...]

"Howrah" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sanskrit
A few attempts at revival have been reported in Indian and Nepalese newspapers. India: 14,135 Indians claimed Sanskrit
Sanskrit
to be their mother tongue in the 2001 Census of India:[2] Nepal: 1,669 Nepalis
Nepalis
in 2011
[...More...]

"Sanskrit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sort (typesetting)
In typesetting by hand compositing, a sort or type is a piece of type representing a particular letter or symbol, cast from a matrix mold and assembled with other sorts bearing additional letters into lines of type to make up a form from which a page is printed.Contents1 Background 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksBackground[edit] From the invention of movable type up to the invention of hot metal typesetting essentially all printed text was created by selecting sorts from a type case and assembling them line by line into a form used to print a page. When the form was no longer needed all of the type had to be sorted back into the correct slots in the type case in a very time-consuming process called "distributing". This sorting process led to the individual pieces being called sorts
[...More...]

"Sort (typesetting)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

College Street (Kolkata)
College Street (Bengali: কলেজ স্ট্রিট) is a ~1.5 km long street in central Kolkata
Kolkata
in the Indian state of West Bengal. It stretches (approximately) from Ganesh Chandra Avenue Crossing in Bowbazar
Bowbazar
area to Mahatma Gandhi Road crossing.[1] Its name derives from the presence of many colleges, housing many centres of intellectual activity especially the Indian Coffee House, a café that has attracted the city's intelligentsia for decades.[2]Contents1 Book stores 2 Recognition 3 Educational institutes 4 WBTC 5 Mini bus 6 Private bus 7 References 8 External linksBook stores[edit]Small bookstores along College StreetThe College Street is most famous for its small and big bookstores, which gives it the nickname Boi Para (Colony of Books).[1][3] People from whole city and different parts of the state gathers here for their books
[...More...]

"College Street (Kolkata)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Charles Wilkins
Sir Charles Wilkins, KH, FRS (1749 – 13 May 1836), was an English typographer and Orientalist, and founding member of The Asiatic Society. He is notable as the first translator of Bhagavad Gita into English, and as the creator, alongside Panchanan Karmakar,[1] of the first Bengali typeface.[2] In 1788, Wilkins was elected a member of the Royal Society.[3]Contents1 Biography 2 See also 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] He was born at Frome
Frome
in Somerset in 1749.[4] He trained as a printer. In 1770 he went to India
India
as a printer and writer in the East India Company's service. His facility with language allowed him to quickly learn Persian and Bengali
[...More...]

"Charles Wilkins" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.