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François Savary De Brèves
François Savary de Brèves
François Savary de Brèves
(1560, Melay – 22 April 1628, Paris) was a French ambassador of the 16th and 17th centuries as well as an Orientalist.Contents1 Diplomacy 2 Oriental studies 3 Works 4 See also 5 ReferencesDiplomacy[edit] In 1585, François Savary de Brèves
François Savary de Brèves
accompanied to Constantinople
Constantinople
his relative Jacques Savary de Lancosme, who became ambassador to the Porte
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G. J. Toomer
Gerald James Toomer (born 23 November 1934) is a historian of astronomy and mathematics who has written numerous books and papers on ancient Greek and medieval Islamic astronomy. In particular, he translated Ptolemy's Almagest
Almagest
into English. Formerly a fellow of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge University, he moved to Brown University
Brown University
as a special student in 1959 to study "the history of mathematics in antiquity and the transmission of these systems through Arabic into medieval Europe."[1] He joined the History of Mathematics
Mathematics
department in 1963, became an associate professor in 1965, and was the chairman from 1980 to 1986.[2][3]Contents1 Some works 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksSome works[edit]Diocles: On burning mirrors. The arabic translation of the lost greek original. ed., with English translation and commentary by G. J. Toomer
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Book Of Ruth
The Book of Ruth
The Book of Ruth
(Hebrew: מגילת רות‎, Ashkenazi pronunciation: [məˈɡɪləs rus], Megilath Ruth, "the Scroll of Ruth", one of the Five Megillot) is included in the third division, or the Writings (Ketuvim), of the Hebrew Bible; in most Christian canons it is treated as a history book and placed between Judges and 1 Samuel,[1] as it is set "in the days when the judges judged",[2] although the Syriac Christian tradition places it later, between Ecclesiastes
Ecclesiastes
and the Song of Songs. It is named after its central figure, Ruth the Moabitess, the great-grandmother of David. The book tells of Ruth's accepting the God of the Israelites as her God and the Israelite people as her own. In Ruth 1:16–17, Ruth tells Naomi, her Israelite mother-in-law, "Where you go I will go, and where you stay I will stay. Your people will be my people and your God my God. Where you die I will die, and there I will be buried
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Robert Bellarmine
Saint
Saint
Robert Bellarmine, S.J. (Italian: Roberto Francesco Romolo Bellarmino; 4 October 1542 – 17 September 1621) was an Italian Jesuit
Jesuit
and a Cardinal of the Catholic Church. He was one of the most important figures in the Counter-Reformation. He was a professor of theology and later rector of the Roman College, and in 1602 became archbishop of Capua. Bellarmine supported the reform decrees of the Council of Trent. He was canonized in 1930 and named a Doctor of the Church
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Book Of Psalms
The Book
Book
of Psalms
Psalms
(/sɑː(l)mz/ SAH(L)MZ, /sɔː(l)mz/ SAW(L)MZ; Hebrew: תְּהִלִּים‬ or תהילים‬, Tehillim, "praises"), commonly referred to simply as
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Maronite
Catholicism portal Eastern Christianity portalv t ePart of a series onParticular churches sui iuris of the Catholic Church Latin cross
Latin cross
and Byzantine Patriarchal crossParticular churches are grouped by rite.Latin RiteLatinAlexandrian RiteCoptic Ethiopian EritreanArmenian RiteArmenianByzantine RiteAlbanian Belarusian Bulgarian Croatian and Serbian Greek Hungarian Italo-Albanian Macedonian Melkite Romanian Russian Ruthenian Slovak UkrainianEast Syriac RiteChaldean Syro-MalabarWest Syriac RiteMaronite Syriac Syro-Malankara Catholicism portal Eastern Christianity portalv t eThe Maronite
Maronite
Church (Arabic: الكنيسة المارونية‎) is an Eastern Catholic
Eastern Catholic
sui iuris particular church in full communion with the Pope
Pope
and the Catholic Church, with self-governance under the Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches
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Maronite College
Note: This article is based on the "Catholic Encyclopedia" 1913 and contains a large amount of out-dated information throughout, including the numbers of students. Specifically, many of the practices and forms of dress described changed dramatically during the 1960s. See also Pontifical university. The Roman Colleges, also referred to as the Pontifical Colleges in Rome, are institutions established and maintained in Rome for the education of future ecclesiastics of the Roman Catholic Church. Traditionally many were for students of a particular nationality. The colleges are halls of residence in which the students follow the usual seminary exercises of piety, study in private, and review the subjects treated in class
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Collège De France
The Collège de France
France
(French pronunciation: ​[kɔlɛʒ də fʁɑ̃s]), founded in 1530, is a renowned higher education and research establishment (grand établissement) in France
France
and an affiliate college of PSL University. It is located in Paris, in the 5th arrondissement, or Latin
Latin
Quarter, across the street from the historical campus of La Sorbonne. The Collège is considered to be France's most prestigious research university.[1][2] As of 2017, 21 Nobel Prize winners and 8 Fields Medalists have been affiliated with the Collège. It does not grant degrees. Each professor is required to give lectures where attendance is free and open to anyone. Professors, about 50 in number, are chosen by the professors themselves, from a variety of disciplines, in both science and the humanities
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Polyglot Bible
A polyglot is a book that contains side-by-side versions of the same text in several different languages. Some editions of the Bible
Bible
or its parts are polyglots, in which the Hebrew and Greek originals are exhibited along with historical translations
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Syriac Language
Syriac /ˈsɪri.æk/ (ܠܫܢܐ ܣܘܪܝܝܐ Leššānā Suryāyā), also known as Syriac Aramaic or Classical Syriac,[4][5][6] is a dialect of Middle Aramaic that is the minority language of indigenous ethnic Assyrians/Syriacs in south eastern Turkey, northern Iraq, northeastern Syria
Syria
and North western Iran
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Old Testament
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t ePart of a series onChristianityJesus Christ
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Abraham Ecchellensis
Ibrahim al-Haqilani (February 18, 1605 – July 15, 1664; Latinized as Abraham Ecchellensis) was a Maronite Catholic philosopher and linguist involved in the translation of the Bible
Bible
into Arabic. He translated several Arabic works into Latin, the most important of which was the Chronicon Orientale of Ibnar-Rahib. Brief biography[edit] Born in Haqil, Lebanon, his last name derived from his place of birth. Ibrahim was educated at the Maronite College
Maronite College
in Rome. After taking his doctorate in theology and philosophy, he returned for a time to his native land.[1] Ibrahim was ordained as a deacon and later taught Arabic and Syriac, first in Pisa
Pisa
and then in Rome
Rome
in the College of the Propaganda. In 1628, he published a Syriac grammar
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Guillaume Le Bé
Guillaume Le Bé
Guillaume Le Bé
(French pronunciation: ​[ɡijom lə be]; 1525 – 1598) was a French punchcutter and engraver who specialised in Hebrew
Hebrew
typefaces. He was born in Troyes
Troyes
to a notable family of paper merchants and apprenticed to Robert Estienne
Robert Estienne
in Paris. After completing his apprenticeship, he was active in Venice
Venice
from c. 1540 to 1550, where he produced Hebrew, Latin
Latin
and Greek types for various printer/publishers, notably Marc'Antonio Giustiniani, Carlo Querini and Meir di Parenzo. On his return to France, he established a type foundry which lasted through two generations until the 18th century
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Samaritan Pentateuch
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eThe Samaritan Pentateuch, also known as the Samaritan Torah
Torah
(Hebrew: תורה שומרונית‬ torah shomronit), is a text of the first five books of the Hebrew Bible, written in the Samaritan alphabet
Samaritan alphabet
and used as scripture by the Samaritans. It constitutes their entire biblical canon. Some six thousand differences exist between the Samaritan and the Masoretic Text. Most are minor variations in the spelling of words or grammatical constructions, but others involve significant semantic changes, such as the uniquely Samaritan commandment to construct an altar on Mount Gerizim. Nearly two thousand of these textual variations agree with the Koine Greek
Koine Greek
Septuagint
Septuagint
and some are shared with the Latin Vulgate
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Jean Morin (theologian)
Jean Morin (Latin: Joannes Morinus) (1591 – 28 February 1659) was a French theologian and biblical scholar.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Publications 4 See also 5 References 6 Sources 7 External linksLife[edit] He was born in Blois, to Calvinist parents.[1] He learned Latin
Latin
and Greek at La Rochelle, and continued his studies in Leiden, subsequently moving to Paris. His conversion to the Roman Church is ascribed to Cardinal du Perron. In 1618 he joined the congregation of the Oratory, and in due course took priest's orders. In 1625 he visited England in the train of Henrietta Maria; in 1640 he was at Rome, on the invitation of Pope Urban VIII,[2] who received him with special favor
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Cardinal Richelieu
Cardinal Armand Jean du Plessis, 1st Duke of Richelieu and Fronsac (French pronunciation: ​[aʁmɑ̃ ʒɑ̃ dy plɛsi]; 9 September 1585 – 4 December 1642), commonly referred to as Cardinal Richelieu
Cardinal Richelieu
(French: Cardinal de Richelieu [kaʁdinal d(ə) ʁiʃ(ə)ljø]), was a French clergyman, nobleman, and statesman. He was consecrated as a bishop in 1607 and was appointed Foreign Secretary in 1616. Richelieu soon rose in both the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and the French government, becoming a cardinal in 1622, and King Louis XIII's chief minister in 1624. He remained in office until his death in 1642; he was succeeded by Cardinal Mazarin, whose career he had fostered. Cardinal de Richelieu was often known by the title of the king's "Chief Minister" or "First Minister". He sought to consolidate royal power and crush domestic factions
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