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Benjamin T. Babbitt
Benjamin Talbot Babbitt (May 1, 1809 – October 20, 1889) was a self-made American businessman and inventor who amassed a fortune in the soap industry, manufacturing Babbitt's Best Soap.Contents1 Early life 2 Manufacturing 3 Advertising 4 Embezzlement 5 Death and legacy 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Benjamin Babbitt was born in Westmoreland, New York
Westmoreland, New York
on May 1, 1809. His parents were Betsey (Holman) Babbitt, and Nathaniel Babbitt, a blacksmith, tavern owner and ensign in the militia of Oneida County, New York.[1] As a child, he attended public school and worked on the family farm. He "possessed a most ingenious and inquiring disposition",[2] and by the time he was twenty he was working in a machine shop and had learned the trades of wheelwright, machinist and file maker
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Invention
An invention is a unique or novel device, method, composition or process. The invention process is a process within an overall engineering and product development process. It may be an improvement upon a machine or product or a new process for creating an object or a result. An invention that achieves a completely unique function or result may be a radical breakthrough. Such works are novel and not obvious to others skilled in the same field. An inventor may be taking a big step in success or failure. Some inventions can be patented. A patent legally protects the intellectual property rights of the inventor and legally recognizes that a claimed invention is actually an invention
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North Bergen, New Jersey
North Bergen is a township in Hudson County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States
United States
Census, the township had a total population of 60,773,[9][10][11] reflecting an increase of 2,681 (+4.6%) from the 58,092 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 9,678 (+20.0%) from the 48,414 counted in the 1990 Census.[20] The town was founded in 1843. It was much diminished in territory by a series of secessions.[3] Situated on the Hudson Palisades, it is one of the "hilliest" municipalities in the United States.[21] Like neighboring North Hudson communities, North Bergen is among those places in the nation with the highest population density and a majority Hispanic population.Contents1 History1.1 Colonial era 1.2 Toponymy, secession, and urbanization 1.3 20th century2 Geography 3 Demographics3.1 2010 U.S. Census 3.2 2000 U.S
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P. T. Barnum
Phineas Taylor Barnum (July 5, 1810 – April 7, 1891) was an American showman, politician and businessman remembered for promoting celebrated hoaxes and for founding the Barnum & Bailey Circus (1871–2017).[1] Although Barnum was also an author, publisher, philanthropist, and for some time a politician, he said of himself, "I am a showman by profession...and all the gilding shall make nothing else of me,"[2] and his personal aim was "to put money in his own coffers."[2] Barnum is widely, but erroneously, credited with coining the phrase "There's a sucker born every minute."[3] Born in Bethel, Connecticut, Barnum became a small-business owner in his early twenties and founded a weekly newspaper, before moving to New York City in 1834. He embarked on an entertainment career, first with a variety troupe called "Barnum's Grand Scientific and Musical Theater", and soon after by purchasing Scudder's American Museum, which he renamed after himself
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Bandwagon Effect
The bandwagon effect is a phenomenon whereby the rate of uptake of beliefs, ideas, fads and trends increases the more that they have already been adopted by others. In other words, the bandwagon effect is characterized by the probability of individual adoption increasing with respect to the proportion who have already done so.[1] As more people come to believe in something, others also "hop on the bandwagon" regardless of the underlying evidence. The tendency to follow the actions or beliefs of others can occur because individuals directly prefer to conform, or because individuals derive information from others. Both explanations have been used for evidence of conformity in psychological experiments
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Embezzlement
Embezzlement
Embezzlement
is the act of withholding assets for the purpose of conversion (theft) of such assets, by one or more persons to whom the assets were entrusted, either to be held or to be used for specific purposes.[1] Embezzlement
Embezzlement
is a type of financial fraud
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Woodlawn Cemetery (Bronx, New York)
Woodlawn Cemetery
Cemetery
is one of the largest cemeteries in New York City and is a designated National Historic Landmark. Located in Woodlawn, Bronx, New York City, it has the character of a rural cemetery. Woodlawn Cemetery
Cemetery
opened during the Civil War in 1863,[1] in what was then southern Westchester County, in an area that was annexed to New York City in 1874.[2] It is notable in part as the final resting place of some great figures in the American arts, such as authors Countee Cullen, Nellie Bly, and Herman Melville, and musicians Irving Berlin, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, W. C
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Bronx, New York
The Bronx
The Bronx
(/brɒŋks/) is the northernmost of the five boroughs of New York City within the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New York. It is south of Westchester County; north and east of Manhattan, across the Harlem River; and north of Queens, across the East River. Since 1914, the borough has had the same boundaries as Bronx County, the third-most densely populated county in the United States.[2] The Bronx
The Bronx
has a land area of 42 square miles (109 km2) and a population of 1,471,160 in 2017.[1] Of the five boroughs, it has the fourth-largest area, fourth-highest population, and third-highest population density.[2] It is the only borough predominantly on the U.S. mainland. The Bronx
The Bronx
is divided by the Bronx River
Bronx River
into a hillier section in the west, and a flatter eastern section
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Sinclair Lewis
Harry Sinclair Lewis
Sinclair Lewis
(February 7, 1885 – January 10, 1951) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and playwright. In 1930, he became the first writer from the United States
United States
to receive the Nobel Prize in Literature, which was awarded "for his vigorous and graphic art of description and his ability to create, with wit and humor, new types of characters." His works are known for their insightful and critical views of American capitalism and materialism between the wars.[1] He is also respected for his strong characterizations of modern working women. H. L. Mencken
H. L. Mencken
wrote of him, "[If] there was ever a novelist among us with an authentic call to the trade ... it is this red-haired tornado from the Minnesota wilds."[2] He has been honored by the U.S
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Babbitt (novel)
Babbitt (1922), by Sinclair Lewis, is a satirical novel about American culture and society that critiques the vacuity of middle-class life and the social pressure toward conformity. The controversy provoked by Babbitt was influential in the decision to award the Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
in literature to Lewis in 1930.[1] The word "Babbitt" entered the English language as a "person and especially a business or professional man who conforms unthinkingly to prevailing middle-class standards".[2]Contents1 Themes 2 Zenith 3 Plot 4 Depictions of youth 5 Critical reception 6 Adaptations 7 In popular culture 8 See also 9 References9.1 Notes 9.2 Bibliography10 External linksThemes[edit] After the social instability and sharp economic depression that followed World War I, many Americans in the 1920s saw business and city growth as foundations for stability
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Barge
A barge is a flat-bottomed ship, built mainly for river and canal transport of heavy goods. Some barges are not self-propelled and must be towed or pushed by towboats, canal barges or towed by draft animals on an adjacent towpath. Barges contended with the railway in the early Industrial Revolution, but were outcompeted in the carriage of high-value items due to the higher speed, falling costs and route flexibility of railways.Contents1 Etymology 2 Types 3 Modern use 4 Towed or otherwise unpowered barges in the United States 5 Image gallery 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEtymology[edit] Barge
Barge
carrying recycling material on Deûle channel in Lambersart, France Barge
Barge
is attested from 1300, from Old French
Old French
barge, from Vulgar Latin barga. The word originally could refer to any small boat; the modern meaning arose around 1480
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Square Foot
The square foot (plural square feet; abbreviated sq ft, sf, ft2) is an imperial unit and U.S. customary unit
U.S. customary unit
(non-SI, non-metric) of area, used mainly in the United States and partially in Bangladesh, Canada, Ghana, Hong Kong, India, Malaysia, Nepal, Pakistan, Singapore and the United Kingdom.[citation needed] It is defined as the area of a square with sides of 1 foot. Although the pluralisation is regular in the noun form, when used as an adjective, the singular is preferred. So, a flat measuring 700 square feet could be described as a 700 square-foot flat. This corresponds to common linguistic usage of foot. A symbol for square foot, square feet, and "per square foot" commonly used in architecture, real estate and interior floor plans is a simple square with a vertical line bisecting it—⏍
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West Street (Manhattan)
The West Side Highway
West Side Highway
(officially the Joe DiMaggio
Joe DiMaggio
Highway) is a mostly surface section of New York State Route 9A (NY 9A) that runs from West 72nd Street along the Hudson River
Hudson River
to the southern tip of Manhattan
Manhattan
in New York City.[2] It replaced the West Side Elevated Highway, built between 1929 and 1951, which was shut down in 1973 due to neglect and lack of maintenance, and was dismantled by 1989. The term "West Side Highway" is often mistakenly used to include the roadway north of 72nd Street,[not verified in body] which is properly known as the Henry Hudson Parkway.[2] The current highway was complete by 2001, but required some reconstruction due to damage sustained in the 9/11 attacks. It uses the surface streets that existed before the elevated highway was built: West Street, Eleventh Avenue and Twelfth Avenue
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Lower Manhattan
Lower Manhattan, also known as Downtown
Downtown
Manhattan, is the southernmost part of Manhattan, the central borough for business, culture, and government in the City of New York, which itself originated at the southern tip of Manhattan
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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