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Bengali Language
অবহট্টOld BengaliDialectssee Bengali dialectsWriting system Eastern Nagari script
Eastern Nagari script
(Bengali alphabet) Bengali BrailleSigned formsBengali signed forms[4]Official statusOfficial language in Bangladesh   India
India
(in West Bengal, Tripura
Tripura
& Southern Assam)Regulated by Bangla Academy Paschimbanga Bangla AkademiLanguage codesISO 639-1 bnISO 639-2 benISO 639-3 benGlottolog beng1280[5]Linguasphere 59-AAF-uBengali speaking region of South AsiaBengali speakers around the worldThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.This article contains Bengali text
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Bangala Language
Bangala is a Bantu language
Bantu language
spoken in the northeast corner of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan
South Sudan
and the extreme western part of Uganda. A divergent form of Lingala, it is used as a lingua franca by people with different languages and rarely as a first language. The estimated number of speakers varies between 2 and 3.5 million.[4] It is spoken to the east and northeast of the area where Lingala
Lingala
is spoken.Contents1 History 2 Characteristics 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] As Lingala
Lingala
spread east and north, its vocabulary was replaced more and more by tribal and regional languages, and it became more of an interlanguage (a language that is a mix of two or more languages) and was classified as a separate language – Bangala
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Replacement Character
Specials is a short Unicode
Unicode
block allocated at the very end of the Basic Multilingual Plane, at U+FFF0–FFFF. Of these 16 code points, five are assigned as of Unicode
Unicode
10.0:U+FFF9 INTERLINEAR ANNOTATION ANCHOR, marks start of annotated text U+FFFA INTERLINEAR ANNOTATION SEPARATOR, marks start of annotating character(s) U+FFFB INTERLINEAR ANNOTATION TERMINATOR, marks end of annotation block U+FFFC  OBJECT REPLACEMENT CHARACTER, placeholder in the text for another unspecified object, for example in a compound document. U+FFFD � REPLACEMENT CHARACTER used to replace an unknown, unrecognized or unrepresentable character U+FFFE <noncharacter-FFFE> not a character. U+FFFF <noncharacter-FFFF> not a character.FFFE and FFFF are not unassigned in the usual sense, but guaranteed not to be a Unicode
Unicode
character at all
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List Of Language Regulators
This is a list of bodies that regulate standard languages, often called language academies. Language academies are motivated by, or closely associated with, linguistic purism, and typically publish prescriptive dictionaries,[1] which purport to officiate and prescribe the meaning of words and pronunciations. A language regulator may also be descriptive, however, while maintaining (but not imposing) a standard spelling. Many language academies are private institutions, although some are governmental bodies in different states, or enjoy some form of government-sanctioned status in one or more countries. There may also be multiple language academies attempting to regulate the same language, sometimes based in different countries and sometimes influenced by political factors. Many world languages have one or more language academies
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ISO 639-2
 ISO 639-2:1998, Codes for the representation of names of languages — Part 2: Alpha-3 code, is the second part of the ISO 639 standard, which lists codes for the representation of the names of languages. The three-letter codes given for each language in this part of the standard are referred to as "Alpha-3" codes. There are 464 entries in the list of ISO 639-2 codes. The US Library of Congress
Library of Congress
is the registration authority for ISO 639-2 (referred to as ISO 639-2/RA)
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ISO 639-3
ISO 639-3:2007, Codes for the representation of names of languages – Part 3: Alpha-3 code for comprehensive coverage of languages, is an international standard for language codes in the ISO 639 series. It defines three-letter codes for identifying languages. The standard was published by ISO on 1 February 2007.[1] ISO 639-3 extends the ISO 639-2 alpha-3 codes with an aim to cover all known natural languages
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Glottolog
Glottolog
Glottolog
is a bibliographic database of the world's lesser-known languages, developed and maintained first at the former Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and since 2015 at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany. Glottolog
Glottolog
provides a catalogue of the world's languages and language families, and a bibliography on the world's less-spoken languages
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Linguasphere Observatory
The Linguasphere Observatory (or "Observatoire", based upon its original French and legal title: Observatoire Linguistique) is a transnational linguistic research network.Contents1 History 2 The Lingua sphere Register and Linguascale referential framework2.1 Examples 2.2 Languages of London 2.3 See also3 "Langues de la Liberté/Languages of Liberty" 4 "In the galaxy of languages, each person's voice is a star" 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] It was created in Quebec
Quebec
in 1983 and was subsequently established and registered in Normandy
Normandy
as a non-profit association under the honorary presidency of the late Léopold Sédar Senghor, a French-language poet and the first president of Senegal
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International Phonetic Alphabet
The International
International
Phonetic Alphabet
Alphabet
(IPA) is an alphabetic system of phonetic notation based primarily on the Latin alphabet
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Unicode
Unicode
Unicode
is a computing industry standard for the consistent encoding, representation, and handling of text expressed in most of the world's writing systems. The latest version contains a repertoire of 136,755 characters covering 139 modern and historic scripts, as well as multiple symbol sets
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Tripura
Tripura
Tripura
(/ˈtrɪpuːrɑː/ ( listen)) is a state in Northeast India. The third-smallest state in the country, it covers 10,491 km2 (4,051 sq mi) and is bordered by Bangladesh to the north,[6] south, and west, and the Indian states of Assam
Assam
and Mizoram
Mizoram
to the east. In 2011 the state had 3,671,032 residents, constituting 0.3% of the country's population. The area of modern 'Tripura' was ruled for several centuries by the Tripuri dynasty. It was the independent princely state of the Tripuri Kingdom under the protectorate of the British Empire which was known as Hill Tippera[7] while the area annexed and ruled directly by British India
India
was known as Tippera District (present Comilla District).[8] The independent Tripuri Kingdom (or Hill Tippera) joined the newly independent India
India
in 1949
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Bangladeshi Diaspora
The Bangladeshi diaspora
Bangladeshi diaspora
consists of people of Bangladeshi descent who have immigrated to or were born in another country. First generation migrants may have moved abroad from Bangladesh
Bangladesh
for better living conditions, to escape poverty, to support their financial condition or to send money back to families in Bangladesh. Annual remittances received in Bangladesh
Bangladesh
were 15.4 billion dollars as of 2015[update].[21] There is a large Bangladeshi diaspora
Bangladeshi diaspora
population in Saudi Arabia, where there are almost 1.2 million.[22] There are also significant migrant communities in various Arab states of the Persian Gulf, particularly the United Arab Emirates
United Arab Emirates
and Kuwait, where Bangladeshis are mainly classified as foreign workers
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Bangal
Bangal
Bangal
is a term used to refer to the people of East Bengal
Bengal
(usually from regions around Dhaka
Dhaka
and Barisal), now in Bangladesh
Bangladesh
(as opposed to the Ghotis
Ghotis
of West Bengal). The term is used to describe Bengalis from the east, who are marked by a distinct accent.[citation needed]Some of the people from East Bengal, mainly Hindus, migrated to West Bengal
Bengal
during the Partition of India
Partition of India
in 1947
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Ghoti People
Ghoti, also called Paschimbangiya or Pangiya, are a social group native to West Bengal
Bengal
(Paschimbanga), India. Their dialects, folk traditions (Lokachar) and cuisine are distinct from those of the Purbabangiyas or the natives of erstwhile eastern Bengal. The term came into greater use after many people from Bangladesh
Bangladesh
(then East Bengal
Bengal
and later East Pakistan) migrated to West Bengal
Bengal
during and after the Partition of Bengal
Bengal
in 1947. Initially there was a cultural and sociological clash between the native population and the refugees. Ghotis
Ghotis
are frequently distinguished by their Bangla accent and use of certain local dialects and figures of speech that Bangals in general would not use
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Bengali Hindus
Bengali Hindus
Bengali Hindus
(Bengali: বাঙালি হিন্দু) are ethnic Bengali adherents of Hinduism, and are native to the Bengal region of the Indian subcontinent
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Bengali Buddhists
Bengali Buddhists, (Bengali: বাঙালি বৌদ্ধ, are Buddhists of Bengali ethnic and linguistic identity. Bengali Buddhists constitute 0.4% of the population in Bangladesh. Buddhism
Buddhism
has a rich ancient heritage in the Bengal. The region was a bastion of the ancient Buddhist
Buddhist
Mauryan
Mauryan
and Palan empires, when the Mahayana
Mahayana
and Vajrayana
Vajrayana
schools flourished. South-eastern Bengal
Bengal
was ruled by the medieval Buddhist
Buddhist
Kingdom of Mrauk U
Kingdom of Mrauk U
during the 16th and 17th centuries
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