HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Archbishopric Of Bremen
The Archdiocese of Bremen
Bremen
(also Archdiocese of Hamburg-Bremen, German: Erzbistum Bremen, not to be confused with the modern Archdiocese of Hamburg, founded in 1994) is a historical Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
diocese (787–1566/1648) and formed from 1180 to 1648 an ecclesiastical state (continued under other names until 1823), named Prince-Archbishopric of Bremen
Bremen
(German: Erzstift Bremen) within the Holy Roman Empire. The prince-archbishopric consisted of about a third of the diocesan territory. The city of Bremen
Bremen
was de facto (since 1186) and de jure (since 1646) not part of the prince-archbishopric but belonged to the archdiocese
[...More...]

"Archbishopric Of Bremen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Saxons
The Saxons
Saxons
(Latin: Saxones, Old English: Seaxe, Old Saxon: Sahson, Low German: Sassen) were a group of Germanic tribes first mentioned as living near the North Sea
North Sea
coast of what is now Germany
Germany
(Old Saxony), in the late Roman Empire. They were soon mentioned as raiding and settling in many North Sea
North Sea
areas, as well as pushing south inland towards the Franks
[...More...]

"Saxons" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Verden An Der Aller
Verden can refer to: Verden an der Aller, a town in Lower Saxony, Germany Verden, Oklahoma, a small town in the USA Verden (district), a district in Lower Saxony, Germany Verden (state), a former prince-bishopric (later principality) in the Holy Roman Empire
[...More...]

"Verden An Der Aller" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

German Language
No official regulation ( German orthography
German orthography
regulated by the Council for German Orthography[4]). Language
Language
codesISO 639-1 deISO 639-2 ger
[...More...]

"German Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Catholic Church
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
[...More...]

"Catholic Church" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

De Facto
In law and government, de facto (/deɪ ˈfæktoʊ/ or /di ˈfæktoʊ/[1]; Latin: de facto, "in fact"; Latin pronunciation: [deː ˈfaktoː]), describes practices that exist in reality, even if not legally recognised by official laws.[2][3][4] It is commonly used to refer to what happens in practice, in contrast with de jure ("in law"), which refers to things that happen according to law
[...More...]

"De Facto" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

De Jure
In law and government, de jure (/deɪ ˈdʒʊərɪ/ or /dɪ ˈdʒʊərɪ/; Latin: de iure, lit. 'in law' Latin pronunciation: [deː juːre]) describes practices that are legally recognised, whether or not the practices exist in reality.[1] In contrast, de facto ("in fact" or "in practice") describes situations that exist in reality, even if not legally recognised.[2] The terms are often used to contrast different scenarios: for a colloquial example, "I know that, de jure, this is supposed to be a parking lot, but now that the flood has left four feet of water here, it's a de facto swimming pool".[3] Examples[edit] It is possible to have multiple simultaneous conflicting (de jure) legalities, possibly none of which is in force (de facto). After seizing power in 1526, Ahmad ibn Ibrahim al-Ghazi
Ahmad ibn Ibrahim al-Ghazi
made his brother, Umar Din, the lawful (de jure) Sultan
Sultan
of Adal
[...More...]

"De Jure" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Archbishop
In Christianity, an archbishop (/ˌɑːrtʃˈbɪʃəp/, via Latin archiepiscopus, from Greek ἀρχιεπίσκοπος, from ἀρχι-, "chief", and ἐπίσκοπος, "bishop")[1][2][3] is a bishop of higher rank or office. In some cases, like the Lutheran Church of Sweden, it is the denomination leader title. Like popes, patriarchs, metropolitans, cardinal bishops, diocesan bishops, and suffragan bishops, archbishops are in the highest of the three traditional orders of bishops, priests (also called presbyters), and deacons
[...More...]

"Archbishop" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Weser
The Weser
Weser
(German pronunciation: [ˈveːzɐ]) is a river in Northwestern Germany. Formed at Hannoversch Münden by the confluence of the rivers Fulda and Werra, it flows through Lower Saxony, then reaching the Hanseatic city of Bremen
Bremen
(see: Hanseatic League), before emptying 50 km (31 mi) further north at Bremerhaven
Bremerhaven
into the North Sea. On the opposite (west) bank is the town of Nordenham
Nordenham
at the foot of the Butjadingen
Butjadingen
Peninsula; thus, the mouth of the river is in Lower Saxony. The Weser
Weser
has an overall length of 452 km (281 mi)
[...More...]

"Weser" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Elbe
The Elbe
Elbe
(/ˈɛlbə/; Czech:  Labe (help·info) [ˈlabɛ]; German: Elbe
Elbe
[ˈɛlbə]; Low German: Elv) is one of the major rivers of Central Europe. It rises in the Krkonoše Mountains
Krkonoše Mountains
of the northern Czech Republic
Czech Republic
before traversing much of Bohemia
Bohemia
(Czech Republic), then Germany
Germany
and flowing into the North Sea
North Sea
at Cuxhaven, 110 km (68 mi) northwest of Hamburg. Its total length is 1,094 kilometres (680 mi).[1] The Elbe's major tributaries include the rivers Vltava, Saale, Havel, Mulde, Schwarze Elster, and Ohře.[1] The Elbe
Elbe
river basin, comprising the Elbe
Elbe
and its tributaries, has a catchment area of 148,268 square kilometres (57,247 sq mi), the fourth largest in Europe
[...More...]

"Elbe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Imperial Estate
An Imperial State or Imperial Estate
Imperial Estate
(Latin: Status Imperii; German: Reichsstand, plural: Reichsstände) was a part of the Holy Roman Empire
Empire
with representation and the right to vote in the Imperial Diet (Reichstag). Rulers of these Estates were able to exercise significant rights and privileges and were "immediate", meaning that the only authority above them was the Holy Roman Emperor. They were thus able to rule their territories with a considerable degree of autonomy. The system of imperial states replaces the more regular division of Germany into stem duchies in the early medieval period. The old Carolingian stem duchies were retained as the major divisions of Germany under the Salian dynasty, but they became increasingly obsolete during the early high medieval period under the Hohenstaufen, and they were finally abolished in 1180 by Frederick Barbarossa in favour of more numerous territorial divisions
[...More...]

"Imperial Estate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Reichsthaler
The Reichsthaler (German: [ˈʁaɪçsˌtaːlɐ]) was a standard Thaler of the Holy Roman Empire, established in 1566 by the Leipzig convention. It was also the name of a unit of account in northern Germany and of a silver coin issued by Prussia.Contents1 Reichsthaler coin 2 Reichsthaler unit of account 3 Prussian Reichsthaler 4 See also Reichsthaler coin[edit] The Leipzig
Leipzig
convention set the Reichsthaler as a coin containing ​1⁄9 of a Cologne mark of silver. The various German states within the Empire issued Reichsthaler together with smaller coins according to whatever system of subdivisions they chose
[...More...]

"Reichsthaler" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Imperial Diet (Holy Roman Empire)
The Imperial Diet (Latin: Dieta Imperii/Comitium Imperiale; German: Reichstag) was the deliberative and legislative body of the Holy Roman Empire. Its members were the Imperial Estates, divided into three colleges. The diet as a permanent, regularized institution evolved from the Hoftage (court assemblies) of the Middle Ages. From 1663 until the end of the empire in 1806, it was in permanent session at Regensburg. The Imperial Estates had, according to feudal law, no authority above them besides the Holy Roman Emperor
Holy Roman Emperor
(or emperor-elect) himself. The holding of an Imperial Estate
Imperial Estate
entitled one to a vote in the diet. Thus, an individual member might have multiple votes and votes in different colleges. In general, members did not attend the permanent diet at Regensburg, but sent representatives instead
[...More...]

"Imperial Diet (Holy Roman Empire)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Holy Roman Empire
The Holy Roman Empire
Roman Empire
(Latin: Sacrum Romanum Imperium; German: Heiliges Römisches Reich) was a multi-ethnic complex of territories in central Europe that developed during the Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and continued until its dissolution in 1806.[6] The largest territory of the empire after 962 was the Kingdom of Germany, though it also came to include the Kingdom of Bohemia, the Kingdom of Burgundy, the Kingdom of Italy, and numerous other territories.[7][8][9] On 25 December 800, Pope Leo III crowned the Frankish king Charlemagne as Emperor, reviving the title in Western Europe, more than three centuries after the fall of the Western Roman Empire
[...More...]

"Holy Roman Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lower Rhenish–Westphalian Circle
The Lower Rhenish–Westphalian Circle
Lower Rhenish–Westphalian Circle
(German: Niederrheinisch-Westfälischer Reichskreis) was an Imperial Circle
Imperial Circle
of the Holy Roman Empire. It comprised territories of the former Duchy of Lower Lorraine, Frisia
Frisia
and the Westphalian part of the former Duchy of Saxony. The circle was made up of numerous small states, however the Counts De la Marck were able to collect a significant amount of territories, the United Duchies of Jülich-Cleves-Berg
United Duchies of Jülich-Cleves-Berg
from 1521 on
[...More...]

"Lower Rhenish–Westphalian Circle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Personal Union
A personal union is the combination of two or more states that have the same monarch while their boundaries, laws, and interests remain distinct.[1] A real union, by contrast, will involve the constituent states being to some extent interlinked, such as by sharing governmental institutions. In a federation and a unitary state, a central (federal) government spanning all member states exists, with the degree of self-governance distinguishing the two. The ruler in a personal union does not need to be a hereditary monarch.[2] Personal unions can arise for several reasons, ranging from coincidence (a woman who is already married to a king becomes queen regnant, and their child inherits the crown of both countries; the King
King
of one country inherits the crown of another country) to virtual annexation (where a personal union sometimes was seen as a means of preventing uprisings)
[...More...]

"Personal Union" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.