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A Course In Phonetics
Peter Nielsen Ladefoged (English: /ˈlædɪfoʊɡɪd/;[1] Danish: [pedɐ nelsn̩ ˈlæːðfowð]; 17 September 1925 – 24 January 2006) was a British linguist and phonetician who travelled the world to document the distinct sounds of endangered languages and pioneered ways to collect and study data.[2] He was active at the universities of Edinburgh, Scotland
Scotland
and Ibadan, Nigeria
Nigeria
1953–61.[3] At Edinburgh he studied phonetics with David Abercrombie, who himself had studied with Daniel Jones and was thus connected to Henry Sweet.[4] At the time of his death, he was Professor of Phonetics Emeritus at University of California, Los Angeles
University of California, Los Angeles
(UCLA), where he taught from 1962 to 1991
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Robert Longacre
Robert E. Longacre
Robert E. Longacre
(August 13, 1922–April 20, 2014) was an American linguist and missionary who worked on the Triqui language and a text-based theory and method of discourse analysis.[1] He is well known for his seminal studies of discourse structure (text linguistics), but he also made significant contributions in other linguistic areas, especially the historical linguistics of Mixtec, Trique, and other related languages. His PhD was at the University of Pennsylvania under Zellig Harris
Zellig Harris
and Henry Hoenigswald. His 1955 dissertation on Proto-Mixtecan was the first extensive linguistic reconstruction in Mesoamerican languages. This was one of several SIL studies which helped to establish the Oto-Manguean
Oto-Manguean
language family as being comparable in time depth to Proto-Indo-European
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Economic Development
Economic development
Economic development
is the process by which a nation improves the economic, political, and social well-being of its people. The term has been used frequently by economists, politicians, and others in the 20th and 21st centuries. The concept, however, has been in existence in the West for centuries. "Modernization, "westernization", and especially "industrialization" are other terms often used while discussing economic development. Economic development
Economic development
has a direct relationship with the environment and environmental issues.[further explanation needed] Whereas economic development is a policy intervention endeavor with aims of improving the economic and social well-being of people, economic growth is a phenomenon of market productivity and rise in GDP
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Cinema Of The United States
The cinema of the United States, often metonymously referred to as Hollywood, has had a profound effect on the film industry in general since the early 20th century. The dominant style of American cinema is classical Hollywood
Hollywood
cinema, which developed from 1917 to 1960 and characterizes most films made there to this day. While Frenchmen Auguste and Louis Lumière
Auguste and Louis Lumière
are generally credited with the birth of modern cinema,[7] American cinema quickly came to be the most dominant force in the industry as it emerged
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My Fair Lady (film)
My Fair Lady
My Fair Lady
is a 1964 American musical film adapted from the Lerner and Loewe eponymous stage musical based on the 1913 stage play Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw. With a screenplay by Alan Jay Lerner and directed by George Cukor, the film depicts a poor Cockney
Cockney
flower seller named Eliza Doolittle
Eliza Doolittle
who overhears an arrogant phonetics professor, Henry Higgins, as he casually wagers that he could teach her to speak "proper" English, thereby making her presentable in the high society of Edwardian London. The film stars Audrey Hepburn
Audrey Hepburn
and Rex Harrison
Rex Harrison
as Eliza Doolittle
Eliza Doolittle
and Henry Higgins respectively, with Stanley Holloway, Gladys Cooper
Gladys Cooper
and Wilfrid Hyde-White
Wilfrid Hyde-White
in supporting roles
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George Cukor
George Dewey
George Dewey
Cukor (/ˈkjuːkər/; July 7, 1899 – January 24, 1983) was an American film director.[1] He mainly concentrated on comedies and literary adaptations. His career flourished at RKO
RKO
when David O. Selznick, the studio's Head of Production, assigned Cukor to direct several of RKO's major films, including What Price Hollywood? (1932), A Bill of Divorcement (1932), Our Betters
Our Betters
(1933), and Little Women (1933)
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Rex Harrison
Sir
Sir
Reginald Carey "Rex" Harrison (5 March 1908 – 2 June 1990) was an English actor of stage and screen. Harrison began his career on the stage in 1924. He served in the Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
during World War II, reaching the rank of flight lieutenant. He won his first Tony Award for his performance as Henry VIII
Henry VIII
in the play Anne of the Thousand Days in 1949. He won his second Tony for the role of Professor Henry Higgins in the stage production of My Fair Lady
My Fair Lady
in 1957
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Academy Awards
MoonlightBest Picture The Shape of WaterThe Academy Awards, also known as the Oscars,[1] are a set of 24 awards for artistic and technical merit in the American film industry, given annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), to recognize excellence in cinematic achievements as assessed by the Academy's voting membership. The various category winners are awarded a copy of a golden statuette, officially called the "Academy Award of Merit", which has become commonly known by its nickname "Oscar". The sculpture was created by George Stanley.[2] The awards, first presented in 1929 at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, are overseen by AMPAS.[3][4] The awards ceremony was first broadcast on radio in 1930 and televised for the first time in 1953. It is now seen live in more than 200 countries and can be streamed live online.[5] The Academy Awards ceremony is the oldest worldwide entertainment awards ceremony
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Consonant
In articulatory phonetics, a consonant is a speech sound that is articulated with complete or partial closure of the vocal tract. Examples are [p], pronounced with the lips; [t], pronounced with the front of the tongue; [k], pronounced with the back of the tongue; [h], pronounced in the throat; [f] and [s], pronounced by forcing air through a narrow channel (fricatives); and [m] and [n], which have air flowing through the nose (nasals)
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Vowel
Paired vowels are: unrounded • roundedManners of articulationObstruent    Stop     Affricate     Fricative        Strident            SibilantSonorant    Nasal     Approximant        Semivowel    Vowel     Vibrant        Flap/Tap         TrillLiquid    Rhotic     LateralOcclusive ContinuantAirstreamsEgressive Ingressive Ejective Implosive Nonexplosive Lingual (clicks) Linguo-pulmonic Linguo-ejective PercussiveSee alsoArticulatory phonetics Aspirated consonant No au
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Language Death
In linguistics, language death (also language extinction (the language is no longer spoken) or linguicide[1] (death of a language from natural or political causes), and rarely also glottophagy[2] (absorption or replacement of minor language with major language)) occurs when a language loses its last native speaker. Language
Language
death is a process that affects speech communities where the level of linguistic competence that speakers possess of a given language variety is decreased, eventually resulting in no native or fluent speakers of the variety. Language
Language
death may affect any language idiom, including dialects
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Nationalism
Nationalism
Nationalism
is a political, social, and economic system characterized by promoting the interests of a particular nation particularly with the aim of gaining and maintaining self-governance, or full sovereignty, over the group's homeland. The political ideology therefore holds that a nation should govern itself, free from unwanted outside interference, and is linked to the concept of self-determination. Nationalism
Nationalism
is further oriented towards developing and maintaining a national identity based on shared characteristics such as culture, language, race, religion, political goals or a belief in a common ancestry.[1][2] Nationalism
Nationalism
therefore seeks to preserve the nation's culture. It often also involves a sense of pride in the nation's achievements, and is closely linked to the concept of patriotism
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Tribalism
Tribalism is the state of being organized in or an advocate for a tribe or tribes. In terms of conformity, tribalism may also refer in popular cultural terms to a way of thinking or behaving in which people are loyal to their social group.[1] Tribalism has been defined[by whom?] as a "way of being" based upon variable combinations of kinship-based organization, reciprocal exchange, manual production, oral communication and analogical enquiry.[2] Ontologically, tribalism is oriented around the valences of analogy, genealogy and mythology
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International Phonetic Association
The International Phonetic Association
International Phonetic Association
(IPA; in French, Association phonétique internationale, API) is an organization that promotes the scientific study of phonetics and the various practical applications of that science. The IPA’s major contribution to phonetics is the International Phonetic Alphabet—a notational standard for the phonetic representation of all languages. The acronym IPA is used to refer to both the association and the alphabet. It was incorporated as a UK private company limited by guarantee on 30 June 2015.[1][2] The IPA also publishes the Journal of the International Phonetic Association
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University College London
£1.304 billion (university); £1.327 billion (consolidated) (2016-17)[2]Chancellor The Princess Royal (as Chancellor of the University of London)Provost Michael ArthurChair of the Council Dame DeAnne Julius[3]Academic staff7,070 (2014/15)[4]Administrative staff4,910 (2014/15)[4]Students 37,905 (2016/17)[5]Undergraduates 18,610 (2016/17)[5]Postgraduates 19,225 (2016/17)[5]Location London, United KingdomVisitor Terence Etherton (as Master of the Rolls ex officio)[6]Colours                     AffiliationsListAlan Turing Institute ACU ENTER European University Association
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International Phonetic Alphabet
The International
International
Phonetic Alphabet
Alphabet
(IPA) is an alphabetic system of phonetic notation based primarily on the Latin alphabet
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